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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AN UPDATE ON KWIN_WAYLAND Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 7:10pm
Story RAW Sharpening and Noise Reduction With Raw Therapee on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 7:01pm
Story The New Features Of Mesa 10.3 Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:53pm
Story Linux Turns 23 Years Old Today Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:48pm
Story Don’t Fret Linus, Desktop Linux Will Slowly Gain Traction Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:41pm
Story Spice Fire One now in India: A look at alternate mobile OSes beyond Android, iOS, WP8 Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:22pm
Story Start Talking About the GNU/Linux Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 5:57pm
Story Choose your side on the Linux divide Roy Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 3:45pm
Story Linux Skills Gap: Where to Look for Linux Systems Management? Roy Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 3:42pm
Story Why China’s new domestic desktop operating system could actually stick Roy Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 12:11pm

First Look: PCLinuxOS 2009.1 GNOME

Filed under
PCLOS

news.softpedia.com: I used to be one of PCLinuxOS' fans and I especially enjoyed the GNOME flavor so hearing that the team was ready to finally launch a new version sparkled a lot of interest in me.

OzOS Linux - The Wizard or the Tinman?

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: I like exotic distributions. The promise of the beautiful E17 windows manager on top of the lightweight Xubuntu is what drew me to this little known distribution. Hence, this review.

15 Interesting Facts About the Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Exactly 15 years ago, on March 1994, Linux kernel version 1.0.0 was humbly released for the world to tinker with. To celebrate the historic moment, I have collected some really interesting facts about the Linux kernel.

Intro to V4L2

Filed under
Software

linuxdevices.com: This articles describes the Linux's V4L2 (Video for Linux 2) interface, along with the first steps toward developing a device driver that uses the interface. It is based on Linux 2.6.28, and may not apply to other kernel versions.

The Advantages Of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

seogadget.co.uk: Bob Smiley left a fantastic comment on my blog a few days back. The comment was so rich, detailed and lengthy that it justifies a blog post all on its own. So, Bob Smiley summarises the advantages of Ubuntu.

The Linux Leap of Faith

Filed under
Linux

mr-oss.com: It is easy to sit on the Linux bandwagon and shout about how running Linux could solve all your problems. It's also easy to see that this just isn't really true.

The Application Installation Situation on Linux Distros

Filed under
Linux

blog.ibeentoubuntu: Installing apps under most distributions is rather simple. When it's not simple, though, it becomes a lot more difficult. Easy is dead easy. Everything else is pretty difficult.

Use The Tools

Filed under
Linux

pthree.org: When I taught Linux system administrators, I would go through a series of rules, and rule #1 was always: Whenever you’re editing config files, and a tool exists to make the change, use the tool instead of editing the config by hand.

Life Without Proprietary Software: Is It Possible?

Filed under
OSS

workswithu.com: Someone on the Ubuntu forums started an interesting thread today asking, “Can you manage to use only free software on your pc?“ It got me thinking about my dependency on proprietary software, and whether I’d ever really be able to get it out of my life entirely.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux Gaining Strength In Downturn

  • PCLinuxOS 2009.1 Bounces Back with a Bang
  • Schools to benefit from £30m open source project, first in UK
  • Famous firsts: Wireless
  • 1 In 3 IT Shops Uses Combo Proprietary, Open Source Software
  • Open Sources Episode 8 -- obey your Puppet master
  • Buying a netbook Linux vs. Windows XP
  • VirtualBox 2.1.4
  • Fancy Schmancy or Fine and Functional?
  • Ubuntu OpenOffice.org using gvfs fuse now
  • Rethinking OSS business model classifications
  • PC moment for open source may lack profit
  • FOSS Debates, Part 2: Standard Deviations
  • OOo Compare: Inadequate
  • VDPAU + OpenGL 3.0 On Gallium3D This Summer?
  • Shining Light on Why Microsoft Loves LAMP to Death
  • Finland warms up to Open Source for Public Adminstration
  • Unix and Linux Cartoons For The Weekend
  • Debian Project updates Package Policy
  • iPhone suffers as Android buoys Linux cause
  • Opera Turbo Labs release
  • 10 Extreme Biases You Must Acquire When Switching to Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • FFMPEG-0.5 Compile for Mandriva 2009.0

  • last and history
  • Bash Shell Temporarily Disable an Alias
  • Easy Linux Log Viewing with Log Viewer
  • Really rapid C++ development with KDevelop4
  • Remove columns from text
  • Delete Files from my Linux Trashbin- Solution
  • Jaunty: Apt is broken? Move to another country
  • Linux basics: Learn common commands
  • Enigmail Makes Encrypting Email Easy
  • VMware arrow keys issues
  • Install Android Fonts (ttf-droid) on Arch Linux
  • Quick Fix: Black Desktop Background and Lost Icons

W3C Stats, Linux, Mac, and Windows -- Relevant?

Filed under
OS

blog.ibeentoubuntu: The above graph shows the OS stats for W3C since March, 2003. Side-stepping the debate over whether the stats are an accurate representation of the OS share, I'd like to look at the trends.

Midori: Extremely Fast and Standards-Compliant

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: Midori is a lightweight GTK web browser which uses the popular WebKit rendering engine. I installed it on my Eee PC netbook to see if it could replace Firefox for light browsing.

5 Compiz Effects That Are Actually Useful

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: Compiz has a lot of nice effects that are mostly useless. In my quest to find a work place without distraction compiz effects doesn’t really fit it. Here are five effects that I actually found useful:

Ubuntu For Non-Geeks, 3rd Edition: A Big Thumbs Up

Filed under
Reviews

linuxtoday.com/blog: I prefer a direct approach: show me. Which "Ubuntu For Non-Geeks, 3rd Edition: A Pain-Free, Project-Based, Get-Things-Done Guidebook" does in a most excellent fashion.

Compile source code - and solve problems

Filed under
HowTos

tuxradar.com: Building software from source - that's a bit old-school, isn't it? Who wants to wrestle with the command line, hunting down dependencies and coaxing the GCC compiler into running properly?

Advocacy at the Speed of Light

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org/blog: The latest course on the menu is, of course, the Linux.com site. This one is the fun one, because we've opened it up to the community to lend their ideas. Here's the top 5 thus far:

The beauty of Free Software Development and Free Software Community

Filed under
OSS

anoopjohn.com: When you work in the software industry, either in the services sector, or in the products sector, you never get to see the harmony, the cooperation and the amiability that, you find in the Free Software Community.

Popcorn - Popularity Contest (for RPM)

Filed under
Software

stick.gk2.sk/blog: A few days ago I came across Feature #305877. What is it about? Well, Debian has the Popularity Contest, which tracks installed packages, how often they are used and sends an anonymized report once a week to their server.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Codesmith Students Garner National Praise for Open-Source Contributions
    Reactide is an Integrated Development Environment built for React, which intends to make React development easier for Software Engineers. The project has been widely praised, amassing over 6,000 stars on GitHub.
  • Airbnb’s new open source library lets you design with React and render to Sketch
    Today, Airbnb’s design team open sourced its internal library for writing React components that easily render directly to Sketch. Instead of trying to get Sketch to export to code, the Airbnb team spent its time on the opposite — putting the paintbrush in the hands of the engineer.
  • [Older] Telecoms copying cloud providers make beeline for open source, say analysts
    The supersonic growth of Amazon Web Services and other cloud providers in the past few years owes much to open-source communities that fed them cutting-edge tech free-of-charge. Now telecom is mimicking this strategy through involvement with the Linux Foundation, according to Scott Raynovich (@rayno) (pictured, right), guest host of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s mobile live streaming studio.
  • Get a Preview of Apache IoT Projects at Upcoming ApacheCon
    The countdown until ApacheCon North America has begun. The blockbuster event will be in Miami this year and runs May 16-18. The Apache community is made up of many niche communities and ApacheCon offers something for all of them. Here, Roman Shaposhnik, Director of Open Source, Pivotal Inc., who is heading the Apache IoT track at the ApacheCon conference, gave us a sneak peek of what the Apache Internet of Things community can look forward to at the event.
  • Free Webinar on Starting a Collaborative Open Source Project
  • Oracle draws curtains on OmniOS
    With its openly stated operational remit of ‘aggressive acquisitions’ (albeit positively aggressive), Oracle is (very) arguably a firm known for buying, swallowing, acquiring those companies it decides to consume.
  • Partners Healthcare, Persistent Systems to develop open-source platform
  • Libreboot Applies to Rejoin GNU
    Last week we reported that after reorganization, Libreboot was considering rejoining GNU and was seeking input from its community to determine the amount of support it had for such a move. From reading the comments posted both on our article on FOSS Force and on Libreboot’s website, it comes as no surprise that the project’s core members feel they have the necessary consesus to proceed. Last night, FOSS Force received an email — sent jointly to us and Phoronix — letting us know of the decision. Rather than repeat what’s already been written and said on the subject (for that, follow the first link above), we’re publishing a slightly edited version of the email, which will pretty much bring everyone up to date on the situation.

Security updates and no more patches from grsecurity (without a fee)

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • GrSecurity Kernel Patches Will No Longer Be Free To The Public
    The GrSecurity initiative that hosts various out-of-tree patches to the mainline Linux kernel in order to enhance the security will no longer be available to non-paying users. GrSecurity has been around for the better part of two decades and going back to the 2.4 kernel days. In 2015 the stable GrSecurity patches became available to only commercial customers while the testing patches had still been public. That's now changing with all GrSecurity users needing to be customers.
  • Passing the Baton: FAQ
    This change is effective today, April 26th 2017. Public test patches have been removed from the download area. 4.9 was specifically chosen as the last public release as being the latest upstream LTS kernel will help ease the community transition.
  • grsecurity - Passing the Baton
    Anyone here use grsecurity and have any thoughts about this?

Microsoft-Connected Forrester and Black Duck Continue to Smear FOSS

More Coverage of Kali Linux 2017.1 Release

  • Kali Linux 2017.1 Security OS Brings Wireless Injection Attacks to 802.11 AC
    Offensive Security, the developers of the BackTrack-derived Kali Linux open-source, security-oriented operating system announced the availability of the Kali Linux 2017.1 rolling release. Since Kali Linux become a rolling distro, the importance of such updated images was never the same, but Kali Linux 2017.1 appears to be a major release of the ethical hacking distro, adding a bunch of exciting new features and improvements to the Debian-based operating system.
  • Kali Linux 2017.1 Released With New Features | Download ISO Files And Torrents Here
    Offensive Security has updated the Kali Linux images with new features and changes. Termed Kali Linux 2017.1, this release comes with support for wireless injection attacks to 802.11ac and Nvidia CUDA GPU. You can simply update your existing installation by running few commands if you don’t wish to download the updated images from Kali repos.