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Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why Teach Linux? Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 10:59am
Story Be a Mechanic...with Android and Linux! Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 10:57am
Story GNURoot: Linux on Android, No Root Required Rianne Schestowitz 27/12/2013 - 9:17pm
Story X.Org Server 1.15 Release Has Several New Features Rianne Schestowitz 27/12/2013 - 8:33pm
Story Minty Day in the Linuxsphere Rianne Schestowitz 27/12/2013 - 7:57pm
Story Ubuntu Is Storing Wi-Fi Passwords in Clear Text by Default Rianne Schestowitz 27/12/2013 - 7:00pm
Story Mark Shuttleworth interview: Taking Ubuntu beyond desktops Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2013 - 4:55pm
Story Wayland-Powered Hawaii 0.2 Desktop Released Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2013 - 4:53pm
Story MK802 IV Linux mini PC giveaway Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2013 - 4:49pm
Story Linux distro Ubuntu enables SSD TRIM support by default Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2013 - 4:46pm

Why openSUSE 11 is the Linux for me

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sjvn: Recently, my colleague James Turner reviewed openSUSE 11 and he liked it. It's hard to tell from some of the notes he got back-shame on you people!--but he really did. I, on the other hand, love openSUSE 11.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 30

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SUSE Issue #30 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: openSUSE Build Service 1.0 Released, Announcing openSUSE Day at LinuxWorld Expo, and People of openSUSE: Joe Brockmeier.

UMPCs and Linux: made for each other, and coming soon

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Hardware Who knew that the biggest desktop Linux show of 2008 would turn out to be the June Computex show in Taipei, Taiwan, where the next generation of Linux desktop hardware was put on display? In fact, Linux was at the heart of no fewer than four different ultra mobile PCs (UMPC).

Ubuntu Kung Fu: Over 300 Tips, Tricks, Hints and Hacks

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Ubuntu Ubuntu’s rise to power has been rapid, historic and well-deserved. It’s the best Linux distribution ever, but most people only use a fraction of its power. Award-winning Linux author Keir Thomas gets down and dirty with Ubuntu to provide over 300 concise tips that enhance productivity, avoid annoyances, and simply get the most from Ubuntu. 375 pages, PDF = 22 USD.

some howtos:

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  • For those "oops" moments: ext3undel

  • Script for RAW files into JPEG (or TIFF or PNG…)
  • Tip-redirecting with sudo command
  • Monitoring network performance with GNetWatch
  • How to Install MSN Messenger on Ubuntu Linux?
  • Edit The Applications Menu With Two-Clicks : Ubuntu 8.04
  • Fix Java in Firefox 3
  • Building shared libraries with Libtool

Ubuntu: Top programs for normal users

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danilop.wordpress: I am sitting here in the library studying and I just took a pause. Today I want to describe some programs which I use everyday and which are really good.

Reminder: Physical access = Root access

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useopensource.blogspot: Today I needed to reset a password on an Ubuntu system. While doing this, I was reminded of just how simple it is to get root access on a default install of Ubuntu. I wanted to share these steps on this blog to remind people that if someone has physical access to your Ubuntu system, they can get root access in just a few seconds.

Also: To root or not to root. That is the question.

Trademarks and open source monopoly

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OSS Our own Big Money Matt is en fuego. Today he asks some great questions about the reach of trademark law in protecting open source companies from competition.

Fedora, Slackware, Debian... and Philosophy

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Linux I have been quiet about Linux this week because I have been busy trying several new versions. In the process, I have learned quite a bit more, and started to think about the philosophy behind Linux, operating system choices, and Free / Open Source software in general. These latest three Linux variants are illustrative of what a good job the "easy" distributions are doing.

Intrepid Ubuntu plans out

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Ubuntu With Intrepid Ibex, the next version of Ubuntu Linux, just a few months away the development team has released details of the most pressing issues for the 8.10 release. Among these are better 3G integration, tighter Firefox integration in KDE, and faster boot times.

Firefox is King

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Moz/FF Mozilla Firefox is now the king of all browsers. --At least based on the web traffic data gathered from and from a popular tech blog by known Windows Vista fanboy user Jeff Atwood.

Also: 11 Powerful Firefox 3 Add-ons That Can Replace Standalone Applications

Opinion: Year of the penguin

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Linux It’s taken the confluence of several disparate but connected events to create the perfect breeding ground for desktop versions of Linux to finally flourish.

Be super-productive with Linux

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Linux It might sound a bit weird but the kind of Operating System you’re probably using may affect your productivity at work! Though, a user is a more responsible entity when it comes to productivity, but somewhere down-the-line, we can hold your operating system responsible for the same.

KDE 4 : The Lightest Desktop Yet ?

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KDE People must be thinking that I've has gone mad ? But read and you will get everything .

Best Buy Selling Ubuntu: Now, the Bad News

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Ubuntu The Web is buzzing about Best Buy’s decision to stock Ubuntu Linux on its shelves. But I have to say, I’m not all that impressed by the news. Here’s why.

Also: I’ll have the #3 Value Meal, Super Size, with an order of Linux

The Perfect Server - OpenSUSE 11

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This is a detailed description about how to set up an OpenSUSE 11 server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 32-bit version of OpenSUSE 11, but should apply to the 64-bit version with very little modifications as well.

today's leftovers

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  • Have linux, will travel

  • Post-Gates: Microsoft, Competition and the Semantic Web
  • Why I Am Leaning Toward Debian
  • Bank of America may finally embrace Firefox
  • Can Open Source Drive Sustainable Innovation?
  • Italian lawyers use open source software to move online
  • Cheese : Easy to use WebCam application for Linux
  • Howto Schedule Bittorrents to Automatically Download in Ubuntu
  • FIRST: Water found on Moon
  • Announcing openSUSE Day at LinuxWorld Expo
  • MTN Huawei E220 on ubuntu linux
  • "Piggybacking" and the open-source trademark issue
  • The Open Source Mobile OS Battle Continues

How broken is Firefox 3.0

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Moz/FF I thought it was me, but there are several reports of Firefox/Iceweasel 3.0 bugs, including missing images, right after they were loaded!

Drupal 6.3 and 5.8 released, fixing security issues

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Drupal Drupal 6.3 and Drupal 5.8, maintenance releases fixing problems reported using the bug tracking system, as well as security vulnerabilities, are now available for download. Upgrading your existing Drupal 5 and 6 sites is strongly recommended.

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More in Tux Machines

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more

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