Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 27 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Pinguy OS Gives Good GNOME, Is Unity Bad, and Lotsa Coming Games Rianne Schestowitz 14/06/2014 - 6:37am
Story xdg-shell: Wayland Rianne Schestowitz 14/06/2014 - 6:32am
Story Open Linux stack for Nvidia Jetson SBC taps new Linux 3.15 Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 10:35pm
Story Is Ubuntu's Unity Really All That Bad Nowadays? Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 10:28pm
Story REVAMPING GNOME’S DEFAULT AVATARS Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:48pm
Story Wine 1.7.20 Finally Released, Brings X11 Drag & Drop Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:30pm
Story Google Chrome 37 Dev Brings Multiple Fixes and a KDE-Only Feature Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:22pm
Story MATE 1.8 Arrives in Debian Repositories Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:10pm
Story Why the release of RHEL 7 is important to Fedora Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 6:57pm
Story Tizen based Samsung NX1, 28MP sensor camera to launch in September? Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 6:23pm

Perl 5.8.9 released

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: Perl 5.8.9 has been released as the latest and probably last significant release of the Perl 5.8 series. Future releases of the Perl 5.8 series are expected to only deal with security and platform build issues.

The HeHe2-ness Holiday Linux Gift Guide 2008

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: Doing some shopping for your technical friends this year? Or just following the Golden Rule of Giving? That is, Give Something That You Yourself Would Like In Case They Don’t Get Around To Using It. Either way, we’ve shifted through a wide range of gifts to come up with suggestions and ideas in hopes that we can help you expand your range of gift giving.

Open source isn't free software

Filed under
OSS

blogs.computerworld: There's a long standing argument over the differences between "open-source" software and "free software. But, a more common error outside of software ideology circles is that you can use open-source software anyway you please. Nope. Wrong.

A Readers Digest History of Linux

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxblog.com: Linux as we know it was developed in 1991 by Linux Torvalds based upon the GNU code written by, or at least announced by, Richard Stallman in 1983. Just knowing that dispels the myth that Linux is based upon Unix as GNU stands for “Gnu is Not Unix.” This often leads to the use of the term GNU/LINUX.

The OpenSuse FAQ touched me in a bad place

Filed under
SUSE

meandubuntu.wordpress: Today, I was reading Slashdot coverage on the new release of OpenSUSE. Surfing from there led me from one place to another, eventually ending up on the OpenSUSE FAQ:Novell-MS. There was a particular statement that bothered me enough to make this blog entry.

Going Loco Over the Ubuntu Logo

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: Ubuntu is undoubtedly the most popular Linux distribution at the moment. It has millions of passionate users and tons of dynamic community members that can prove it. Let the following images that I’m going to show to you illustrate this phenomenon.

Amarok2.0 Part Two: Continued failure

Filed under
Software

the-gay-bar.com: First thing I saw is that Amarok couldn't playback files but didn't give me any error message. After some thinking I remembered that Ubuntu doesn't install codecs by default but Amarok just silently failed.

Open-source Software Security Vendor Praises 25 Projects

Filed under
OSS

pcworld.com (IDG): Palamida, a vendor that sells software and services around open-source software security and legal compliance, has named 25 open-source projects companies should not hesitate to use.

What’s new in Linux Mint 6 Felicia?

Filed under
Linux

ubuntulook.com: Based on Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex, Linux 2.6.27, Gnome 2.24 and Xorg 7.4, Linux Mint 6 “Felicia” comes with a brand new “Software Manager”, FTP support in mintUpload, proxy support and history of updates in mintUpdate, mint4win (a Linux Mint installer for Microsoft Windows), tabbed browsing in Nautilus and a lot of other improvements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Metro 1.2 Released

  • tor2web brings anonymous Tor sites to the "regular" web
  • My Netbook Took Me Back To Windows
  • ASUS Eee PC 1000HA Netbook
  • The LTSP adds thin-client support to a Linux server
  • Semantic Sense for the Desktop
  • Bringing WINE Into Ubuntu Main
  • 7 Free Open Source Video Editors For Linux
  • Switching to KDE
  • Giving KDE a second chance
  • Intel 2.6 RC1 X.Org Driver Brings DRI2, XvMC
  • Back to Windows
  • Can Wine make Ubuntu better for Ed Tech?
  • Ubuntu EEE's New Name
  • OpenSUSE Linux 11.1 Fans are Jumping the Gun
  • One Linux to Rule Them All?
  • Linux Outlaws 68 - The Episode of the Beast

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Five Firefox Shortcuts You Need to Learn Right Now

  • Managing startup services
  • Monitor your server with Monitorix
  • Converting JPG Files to PDF
  • Condensing with Open Text Summarizer
  • Video Tutorial - Sync Sunbird with Google Calendar
  • Basic features of GIMP
  • Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part II: repeat.vim
  • How to create and extract zip, tar, tar.gz and tar.bz2 files in Linux

Care for some WINE?

Ah the taste of victory. It is sweet. Smile Especially if it is an immense victory over Microsoft.

Market Share of Operating Systems

Filed under
Linux

ultimalinux.com: This chart displays the approximate market share of Windows, Mac, and each of the 312 active Linux distributions as of December 15, 2008. Market share for each of the three major operating systems (Windows, Mac, and Linux) was taken from HitsLink, and is based on data from November 2008.

Novell gets a new/old Linux chief

Filed under
SUSE

cnet.com: Markus Rex, formerly the CTO of SUSE and currently on leave from Novell, is back in the saddle as acting general manager and senior vice president of Novell's Open Platform Solutions business unit.

IBM Sees Linux on Netbooks Making Inroads Vs. Windows in 2009

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: Linux and open source will start to chip away at Microsoft Windows desktop software thanks to their popularity on netbooks, those ultralight, low-cost laptops. IBM Lotus strategy director predicts this as a major trend in 2009.

From Linux to Windows: Is This 2009 Downgrade Really Necessary?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: While speaking recently with one of my bosses, I was told I will receive a new business laptop in 2009. Now, for the problem: It will be running Windows Vista or Windows XP. Hooray for new gear. Boo for Luddite attitudes.

It is alright to be just a Linux user

Filed under
Linux

nuxified.org: Being a GNU/Linux user is a peculiar thing in that you stand a great chance of being pulled into such hard to define brackets such as "Linux community", "Free Software community" or "Open Source community".

Debian women may leave due to 'sexist' post

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: At least two Debian women developers are reconsidering their participation in the GNU/Linux project following the posting of what they deem to be a sexist message to one of the mailing lists meant for developers.

The Range of Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: A comment from Tezzer to my recent blog post about Two New Linux Beta Distributions got me thinking. Tezzer mentions using Debian, but looking at PCLinuxOS and others for systems that have "issues" with some Linux distributions.

The lizard roars: openSUSE 11.1 coming this week

Filed under
SUSE

arstechnica.com: openSUSE 11.1, the next major version of the company's community-driven Linux distribution, is scheduled for release on December 17. The new version will include updated software and some important new features that enhance the quality of the distribution.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

  • MAME 0.183 Open-Source Arcade Machine Emulator Supports Incredibly Rare Systems
    The developers of the open-source and multi-platform MAME (Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator) computer emulator application announced the availability of MAME 0.183. MAME 0.183 is a maintenance and feature release of the software project that promises to add numerous functionality improvements, a bunch of bug fixes, and some new additions, such as support for some incredible rare systems, including Omega, Dodge Man, Flash Boy, Sega Sonic Cosmo Fighter, Galaxy Games StarPak 3, and Puzznic.
  • Some thoughts on Realpolitiks, a real-time grand strategy game now on Linux
    Realpolitiks [Steam, Official Site] is a new real-time (with pausing) grand strategy game from Jujubee S.A. and I was sent a key by the developer to be able to take a look. It does have a demo available on Steam, so it will be worth taking a look to see if it's your thing. A couple of things to note first of all: The game seems to be locked to 60FPS and you cannot adjust the scrolling speed or the interface at all. I actually found the text a bit too small, which didn't help my enjoyment of it.
  • Narita Boy, an absolutely incredible looking 2D scroller with RPG elements is on Kickstarter
  • Trying The SteamVR Beta On Linux Feels More Like An Early Alpha
    This past week Valve brought SteamVR on Linux into public beta. With watching the constant hype around VR on Windows, I was quite excited to finally give VR a try with having lined up an HTC Vive for testing and currently Oculus or others not offering current Linux support. I was thinking that I would have some large GPU/driver comparisons and such completed this weekend, but once actually setting up the hardware and software, I realized that wasn't going to be feasible in such short time. So for those interested in the Linux VR space, here are some of my first impressions and why I would consider the current SteamVR more like an alpha release than beta, just yet another struggle Linux gamers face, and another obstacle to overcome if Linux is to be a more serious competitor to Windows in the gaming space.

The Great Debian Iceweasel/Icedove Saga Comes to an End

The hatchet is finally completely buried. Iceweasel was laid to rest a year ago with the return of Firefox to Debian. Now, Icedove gets to go gently into that good night as well, as the Thunderbird email client returns to Debian. Read more

Releases: Linux From Scratch 8.0, LEDE 17.01, 4MRescueKit 21.0

  • Linux From Scratch 8.0 and Beyond LFS 8.0 Land with GCC 6.2, GNU Binutils 2.27
    Bruce Dubbs from the LFS (Linux From Scratch) and BLFS (Beyond Linux From Scratch) projects that allow experienced users to build their own Linux-based operating systems from scratch announced the release of Linux From Scratch 8.0 and Beyond LFS 8.0. Both Linux From Scratch 8.0 and Beyond Linux From Scratch 8.0 major versions are available with and without the systemd init system, and they offer support for some of the latest GNU/Linux and Open Source components, including GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6.2.0, GNU Binutils 2.27, and Glibc (GNU C Library) 2.24.
  • OpenWRT-Forked LEDE Releases 17.01, Presents At The Embedded Linux Conf
    This week marks the 17.01.0 final release of the Linux Embedded Development Environment (LEDE). They also presented at this week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference about their project that's a fork of OpenWRT and aims for router/embedded use-cases. LEDE 17.01.0 final was released on Wednesday and modernizes many parts of its OpenWRT stack, switches to the Linux 4.4 kernel (from Linux 3.18), updates many pieces of key software, adds additional security features, improves networking support, and has a wide variety of other improvements.
  • 4MRescueKit 21.0 Has Antivirus Live CD 21.0-0.99.2, 4MRecover and 4MParted 21.0

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux Kernels 4.9.13 and 4.4.52 LTS Bring Updated USB Drivers, Networking Fixes
  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Gets Its First Point Release, It's Now Ready for Deployment
    Well, that didn't take long, and it looks like the recently released Linux 4.10 kernel series just got its first point release today, Linux kernel 4.10.1, marking the branch as stable and ready for deployment in stable OSes. Linux kernel 4.10.1 comes only one week after the release of Linux 4.10, which is now considered the most stable and advanced kernel available for any GNU/Linux distribution that wants to adopt it for their users, so you can imagine that the changes are quite small in number. According to the appended shortlog, a total of 21 files were changed in this first point release, with 259 insertions and 52 deletions.
  • GNU Linux-libre 4.10-gnu is now available
  • GNU Linux-Libre 4.10: GPU Drivers Remain The Most Frequent Offenders
    The GNU Linux-libre 4.10 kernel was released last weekend just after the official Linux 4.10 kernel release while I hadn't noticed the de-blobbed kernel release until today. The Linux-libre folks continue to criticize the open-source GPU DRM drivers as being offenders for using binary blob firmware/microcode. GNU Linux-libre for those that don't know is the FSFLA effort to de-blob the mainline Linux kernel by removing support for loading binary-only modules as well as stripping out drivers or portions of driver code that rely upon closed-source/binary-only firmware/microcode images, which is quite common among newer hardware.
  • AMD's Ryzen Will Really Like A Newer Linux Kernel