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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story QEMU 2.1.0-rc3 Has More Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 23/07/2014 - 5:41am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 10:44pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 10:43pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 10:42pm
Story Best Linux Browsers Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 9:19pm
Story 23-inch Android display shows HD digital art Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 8:18pm
Story Looking at the Zooniverse code Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 7:38pm
Story U.K. Cabinet Office Adopts ODF as Exclusive Standard for Sharable Documents Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 7:22pm
Story Nine Reasons Linux Rules the Supercomputing Space Rianne Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 7:14pm
Story Zorin OS 9 - a step forward for Windows migrants Roy Schestowitz 22/07/2014 - 4:56pm

Synchronizing UNIX files with optimized security

Filed under
Security

This article covers cp, tar, and rsync, that can aid with the security of the synchronization of UNIX files

Free Ubuntu book tops 150,000 downloads

Filed under
Ubuntu

desktoplinux.com: Keir Thomas informs us that his new Ubuntu book has been downloaded 150,000 times. Freely downloadable in PDF format MacFreda Publishing's 164-page Ubuntu Pocket Guide and Reference offers a beginner's overview of the popular distro.

Is open source becoming like Microsoft?

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: Talking with Microsoft last week, I was surprised to hear a key reason for Microsoft getting involved with things like optimizing Windows for PHP: it was the only way to ensure products like PHP work with Microsoft technology at all.

Full Circle #21 out now

Filed under
Ubuntu

fullcirclemagazine.org: That’s right folks, FCM#21 is finally here. In this issue: Command and Conquer - Formatting Output, Game Review - Tribal Trouble 2, and Top 5 - Torrent Tools.

Recovering from a Hard Drive Failure

linuxjournal.com: Have you ever woken up in the morning and said to yourself, “today is the day that I'm finally going to backup my workstation!” only to find out that you're a day late and about 320Gb short? Well, that's about what happened to me recently, but don't worry, the story has a happy ending.

Important LAMP systems tunning considerations

Filed under
Linux

This series of three articles on tunning LAMP systems discusses many of the server configuration items that can make or break an application's performance.

Novell may make more acquisitions to fill product line

Filed under
SUSE

computerworld.com: Novell continues to look at acquisitions to fill its product line, Ron Hovsepian, the company's president and CEO, told reporters in Bangalore Monday.

Linus Torvalds – Interview at linux.conf.au 2009

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

abclinuxu.cz: 1) Have you given any more thought to changing the version numbering model of the kernel?
I'd actually like to change the version numbering because right now the 2.6 doesn't mean anything at all.

Netbook Linux at a Crossroads

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Much has been written about how Linux is an optimal OS for a lightweight netbook. And netbooks themselves are on a tear. But some buyers of Linux netbooks are running into trouble. That brings up a good question: just how realistic is Linux on a netbook for mainstream computer buyers?

Take a hard look at the command line

toolbox.com/blogs: When I started up my first computer I was very excited. I unpacked it from its box. Set it up on a table and turned it on. As the screen flickered into life my excitement mounted. Then there was a beep and a black screen with a flashing green block. Welcome to the command line!

The case for Ubuntu on the server

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcauthority.com.au: Does Ubuntu have a future on servers, or is super-stable Debian the classier OS? Leigh Dyer weighs up the pros and cons.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 288

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interview: Linus Torvalds, Linux kernel

  • News: KDE 4.2 goes Fedora-wide, Debian "Lenny" release imminent, OpenSolaris usability focus, Ubuntu guide for free, Easy Peasy and Moblin for netbooks, interview with Fedora Project leader, end of Kurumin Linux
  • Released last week: KNOPPIX 6.0, Pardus Linux 2008.2
  • Upcoming releases: Slamd64 12.2, Fedora 11 Alpha
  • Donations: Openbox receives US$250
  • New additions: Easy Peasy, Moblin
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Ubuntu vs Mandriva : Clash of the titans

Filed under
MDV
Ubuntu

techenclave.com: I have used both of them for quite a long time and I think I can do a better and unbiased comparison...

Carphone Warehouse, netbooks and GNU/Linux: an inquest

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I was browsing around my local Carphone Warehouse shop last week. Unlike the last time I crossed their threshold (November) I noticed that their Ubuntu netbook display had vanished. What when wrong? I decided to investigate.

MEPIS 8: So close you can almost taste it

Filed under
Linux

practical-tech.com: One of my favorite Linux distributions, MEPIS is almost ready with its latest release: 8.0. "I apologize to anyone who was expecting 8.0 to be final by now. It’s taking longer than I had hoped."

Also: Debian 5.0 to be released on Valentine's?

Linux Gazette February 2009 (#159)

Filed under
Linux

The February 2009 issue of Linux Gazette is now available. In this issue: rI18N or The Real Internationalization Project, Installing VMWare Server 2 on Ubuntu Server 8.10, Using The Red Hat Rescue Environment, and more.

NixOS: A Distro Focused on Next-Generation Package Management

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: NixOS is not about to challenge Ubuntu or Fedora as a desktop distribution any time soon. But, then, user-friendliness is not its point. NixOS is designed as a test of Nix, a new package manager designed to overcome key problems with existing package managers.

Microsoft's IE loses more share, slides to new low

Filed under
Microsoft

computerworld.com: Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer (IE) again lost market share last month, although at a slower rate than the previous two-month stretch, but still ended at a new low of 67.6%.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)