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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 22 for ARM Promises to Be a Game Changer Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 5:51pm
Story Jonathan Riddell gets full support from the Kubuntu community Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 12:22pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 12:10pm
Story Ubuntu for Desktop Spotted Running on NVIDIA Shield Tablet Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 10:10am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 9:59am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 9:55am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 9:53am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 9:51am
Story More Mandriva Eulogies Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 9:44am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2015 - 9:41am

KTorrent: KDE’s BitTorrent client

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: In order to download the files associated with torrents, you need a BitTorrent client. KTorrent, a KDE project, is a feature-rich client that is completely self-contained from the moment you start searching for torrents until the last chunk finishes downloading.

KDE.org Relaunched for Software Compilation 4.4

Filed under
KDE
Web

kdenews.org: The KDE web team is pleased to announce a major redesign of the KDE.org frontpage and buzz.kde.org, just in time for the pending release of our updated Workspace, Application and Development Platform compilation.

Oracle Cuts Affect GNOME Accessibility Work

Filed under
Software
  • Oracle Cuts Affect GNOME Accessibility Work
  • MySQL handler Jacobs walks out on Oracle
  • Ellison puts Screven over mySQL
  • Has the Irresistible Rise of OpenOffice.org Begun?

Dell Ubuntu Order Experience

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Dell Ubuntu Order Experience
  • 168-hour days at Dell
  • Memo to Dell: Sort Out Your Ubuntu Strategy

The Linux Desktop Experience For 2010

Filed under
Linux

my.secondpad.com: I’ve been looking at the vast range of Linux desktop flavours around and I thought it might be interesting to give my opinion on what I believe to be right up there as the best from my experience of trying them.

10 Reasons Why the Linux Community Could Influence iPhone Sales

eweek.com: Let's take a look at why Torvalds and the Linux community could affect iPhone sales, while helping Google's Android platform.

Dealing with bugs in Linux

Filed under
Linux

ghacks.net: One of the things I’ve always liked about using Linux is the feeling that my input is actually important. Either by way of giving input to the developers directly or (more importantly) reporting bugs that inevitably appear on a system. It’s the latter of the two that help Linux. But to the new user, these bugs are nothing more than a nuisance, getting in the way of things “just working”.

How To Set Up MySQL Database Replication With SSL Encryption On Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to set up database replication in MySQL using an SSL connection for encryption (to make it impossible for hackers to sniff out passwords and data transferred between the master and slave). MySQL replication allows you to have an exact copy of a database from a master server on another server (slave), and all updates to the database on the master server are immediately replicated to the database on the slave server so that both databases are in sync. This is not a backup policy because an accidentally issued DELETE command will also be carried out on the slave; but replication can help protect against hardware failures.

ABC allowing Linux to view streaming television shows

Filed under
Linux

Linux users for a long time have been kept out of ABC Television's streaming media. Today I checked, and this artificial limitation is no more!

http://gnuski.blogspot.com/2010/02/abc-tv-now-allows-linux-users-to-watch.html

15 fantastic firsts on the Internet

Filed under
Web

royal.pingdom.com: Trailblazers, creatives and innovators have taken the Internet to where it is today and made it an essential part of our everyday lives. We have selected a number of interesting “firsts” from the history of the Internet (and the Web) for your reading pleasure.

Ubuntu 9.10 and GNOME 2.28: Advancing Past Meh

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxplanet.com: Many eons ago, GNOME 1.4 still lived, and it was good. It was extremely configurable and hackable. You could use either Enlightenment or Sawfish as the window manager, and could customize it to your heart's content. And then tragedy struck: GNOME 2.0 was born.

When Linux Nerds Choose Mates from the Windows Herd

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linuxlock.blogspot: Look...let's face this together. Dating can suck. Throw your use/obsession of Linux into the mix and what do you get?

Why Windows Could be Worse Than Teen Dating

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

itworld.com: Though most of the machines at home are currently Linux driven, there are a couple of Windows machines in the house that are used by my children for Software they Cannot Live Without. Being a tolerant Dad you have to know when to pick your battles.

Kolibri: 1.44Mb of cute

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: This might not be of interest to you, but to me, it’s a miracle of modern science.

5 Best Websites To Learn The GIMP Photo Editor

Filed under
Web
GIMP

makeuseof.com: Are you into photo editing and image manipulation? If that’s a ‘yes’ then I’m sure you’ve heard of the GNU Image Manipulation Program, codename GIMP. So you want to learn the GIMP photo editor? Luckily there are websites.

Jolicloud - Jolly good Linux (psst, don't tell anyone)

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Linux has been making some pretty decent progress toward becoming a people's operating system, spearheaded by Ubuntu, it is still a domain of computer freaks, savvy ego-centric hackers and advanced users with a knack for software. But what does Jolicloud tell them?

Android replaced, banned, forked, and shunned

Filed under
OS
  • Angstrom Linux available for Archos 5 Internet Tablet
  • ARCHOS publishes Linux distro for 5 and 7 series Internet Media Tablets
  • Archos posts 'full' Linux distro for Android tablet
  • App Store craziness: banning the word 'Android'
  • The New Era of Big Company Forks
  • Torvalds' Nexus One endorsement may be regretted

Ubuntu Marketing Focus

Filed under
Ubuntu

doctormo.wordpress: There is a discussion going on in the Ubuntu Marketing team’s mailing list about creating Ubuntu videos in order to advertise Ubuntu to normal users.

OU announces Linux course

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The Open University has announced 'Linux - an introduction' a ten week course on the open source operating system aimed at absolute beginners.

The application is the new the operating system

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: In this post-PC, post-OS world, can open source play a leading role? I think so, as does Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin. But it's going to require a very different kind of open source than we've hitherto experienced.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.