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Friday, 17 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Google announces Drive for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 9:56am
Story First distro tests on Lenovo G50 - Ubuntu and Netrunner Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 9:41am
Story Debian 8.0 Release Date & New Gentoo Website Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 9:37am
Story Google's Chromebit Turns Any TV Into a Chrome PC for Under $100 Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 9:35am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 8:37am
Story Ubuntu Security Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 8:36am
Story Open Source Router Aims to Transform Data Center Networks Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 7:34am
Story Initial Intel Braxton Support Might Come To Linux 4.1 Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 6:41am
Story 7 Unikernel Projects to Take On Docker in 2015 Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 6:39am
Story GNOME 3.16 SDK Runtime Now Available Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2015 - 6:37am

What's new in Fedora 12

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The twelfth version of Fedora is equipped with a current and comprehensive selection of software packages that offer a whole range of technological advancements. Several of the new features, which include extended hardware support for kernel-based mode setting (KMS), 3D support for recent Radeon graphics cards, and the emerging KSM (Kernel Samepage Merging), are also likely to turn up in other Linux distributions in the near future.

State of Mozilla and 2008 Financial Statements

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.lizardwrangler.com: Today we are posting our audited financial statements and tax form for 2008. We have also posted our FAQ. As in past years, I’ll use this event as an opportunity to review both our financial status and our overall effectiveness in moving the mission forward.

Linux Kernel Recompilation: Is it Worth the Pain?

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: With Linux Kernel 2.6.32 around the corners I see some guru's suggesting users to recompile their own kernels for a dozen of reasons: performance, fast booting, support of some esoteric drivers, bla... bla...

What Applications Should be in the Standard Installation?

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.ibeentoubuntu: You may have heard that GIMP and F-Spot aren't safe for inclusion in 10.04. 700MB isn't much space to work with Why not question all the applications in Ubuntu, then? What should be in the default installation?

Timed downloads

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu
HowTos

For quite some time I've been looking for a tool to download a list of files (stored in a text file) at a certain time and, if possible, shutdown after completion. Unfortunately there is no know Linux-application that can perform these tasks. Then I got the idea to combine the use of Wget with that of a scheduler.

Google Chrome First Official Screenshots

Filed under
OS
Google

  • Google Chrome First Official Screenshots
  • OMG! ChromeOS Live Blog
  • Official Chromium OS Site
  • Releasing the Chromium OS open source project
  • Chrome OS: Some Early Preview Videos
  • Google Chrome OS Event (and Live webcast)

Improved websites to download OpenOffice.org builds

Filed under
Web
OOo

blogs.sun.com: The current setup of websites for downloading OpenOffice.org installation sets provides builds for several languages and operating systems. But nowadays a lot more are built. Unfortunately they are not that easy to find as they are on mirror servers.

NSA helps Apple, Sun and Red Hat harden their systems

Filed under
Linux
Software
Security

h-online.com: That the American National Security Agency has previously helped Microsoft harden various Windows versions is old hat, but what is news is that the NSA now also assists Apple, Sun and Red Hat with increasing the security of their operating systems.

Fedora 12: A little *too* convenient.

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Fedora, and Redhat before it, has held a special place in my heart for years, being that Redhat Desktop was the very first Linux distribution I ever used, and the one I kept coming back to during my programming classes in college.

Also: Fedora 12 rolls out impressive features

The Ten Most Influential Internet Moments of the Decade

Filed under
Web

itwire.com: Earlier today, the organisers of the Webby Awards announced their selection of the most influential moments on the Internet in the past decade.

Gnome Music Player Client (GMPC) + MPD - Just WOW

Filed under
Linux

GMPC, or Gnome Music Player Client is a lightweight client for MPD, extendable through plug-ins: alarm, album view, AWN applet, dynamic playlist, fullscreen info, jamendo, last.fm, libnotify, lirc, lyrdb, lyricsplugin, lyricwiki, magnatune, wikipedia info, taglib (for editing tags) and so on (in the latest version).

Intel Divulges Information on TRIM for Linux

Filed under
Hardware

Intel made a couple of points that cleared up a lot, starting off with the fact that TRIM is indeed alive and well in Linux, and it comes down to having the right software installed to take advantage of it. I was pointed to a PDF that explains how the command can be executed (section 7.10.3.2), and that's all that's needed for a software engineer to implement the feature, whether it be someone in charge of a distro, a piece of software, or a file system.

My life with Linux: Day 2 - ups and downs of switching

Filed under
Linux

pcauthority.com.au: Stuart Turton spends the second day of his one week odyssey with Linux, battling Fedora and DVD playback troubles, while trying valiantly not to go back to the relative 'safety' of Vista, as frustrations start to boil over.

7 Google Chrome Extensions You Must Have

Filed under
Software

clickonf5.org: Google Chrome Extensions are here and really doing great. There are loads of extensions released by different parties but here we are going to take 7 extensions which you should install on your google chrome to make your life much easier.

10 Years of SourceForge.net

Filed under
Web

ostatic.com: It's often difficult to notice when you're in the midst of making history. In the summer and fall of 1999, I spent some time working next door to four noisy, Mountain Dew-swilling misfits working on a renegade project within VA Linux Systems. Little did I know that their efforts would become known as the world's largest open source development site.

The Perfect Desktop - Kubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Kubuntu 9.10 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge. Kubuntu 9.10 is derived from Ubuntu 9.10 and uses the KDE desktop instead of the GNOME desktop.

Fedora 12 - it's a horse, not a camel

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: The Fedora Project has announced the latest version of its popular open source Linux distribution. So what does the Fedora 12 release have to offer? The answer is quite a bit.

openSUSE 11.2

Filed under
SUSE

lwn.net: Right behind Mandriva and Ubuntu, openSUSE 11.2 arrived as scheduled after almost a year of development. This incremental version increase has enough new features to warrant a closer look. Sometimes adding so many new features between minor versions can backfire.

Good karma: an in-depth review of Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica.com: Good karma: an in-depth review of Ubuntu 9.10
Ubuntu 9.10, codenamed Karmic Koala, was officially released last month. In this comprehensive review, Ars takes you under the surface for an in-depth look at the new features and major architectural changes.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 12: Screenshot gallery
  • New Fedora Spins site with Fedora 12
  • 7 Must Have Linux iPhone Applications
  • Scribble Notes with SimpleText
  • Haiku OS Alpha 1 Screenshots
  • SDC goes open source with Red Hat
  • The Second GNOME 2.30 Development Release
  • Interview: Red Hat about Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization
  • Laptops for each student in 13 schools
  • The easiest but hardest experience in Linux
  • How Jolicloud is adding support for GMA 500 graphics
  • [rant] Arch or Gentoo?
  • Tux Paint a Drawing program with nice effects for Children
  • summary of the last weeks in kamoso land
  • Qimo 4 kids – NGO Interview 5
  • Open source key to software re-use of public administrations
  • The Screen Resolution Bug Resurfaces in Fedora
  • What does the openSUSE Board do?
  • The Best Free Linux Music Servers
  • 3 useful plugins for Gimp
  • Animating with open-source
  • The case for the open-source Goliath
  • Linux Outlaws 122 - In a Gnome Shell
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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux Laptops for Developers

  • 5 New & Powerful Dell Linux Machines You Can Buy Right Now
    The land of powerful PCs and workstations isn’t barren anymore when we talk about Linux-powered machines; even all of the world’s top 500 supercomputers now run Linux. Dell has joined hands with Canonical Inc. to give Linux-powered machines a push in the market. They have launched five new Canonical-certified workstations running Ubuntu Linux out-of-the-box as a part of the Dell Precision series. An advantage of buying these canonical-certified machines is that the users won’t have to worry about incompatibility with Linux.
  • How to set up a Pixelbook for programming
    The beauty of Chrome OS is that most of the "state" of your system is in the cloud, attached to your Google Account, but if you have any local documents those will be gone. This is because Developer Mode basically destroys the physically secure design of Chrome OS. Now you're in Linux land, and local security is your job, not Google's. Every time you boot up now, you'll have the option to press Space bar and wipe the system again and return to the safety of vanilla Chrome OS. Press Ctrl-D to continue into the unknown.

today's leftovers

Graphics: Intel, Mesa, Wayland and Bosch

  • Intel's Mesa GLSL Shader Cache Is Speeding Up Game Load Times
    At the start of the month the Intel i965 Mesa driver finally landed its on-disk shader cache, months after the GLSL on-disk shader cache originally landed in core Mesa and wired up for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. While you can't play too many shader-heavy games with current Intel integrated graphics, this GLSL shader cache within Mesa 17.4-dev Git is working well for speeding up load times and does provide some frame-rate benefits in games dynamically loading shaders.
  • Bosch Has Been Developing A 3D Window Manager Using Wayland
    In what appears to be research for potential use within in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems, Bosch in conjunction with other organizations has been developing a 3D window manager that's built atop Wayland/Weston. Wayland is already used within automobiles for IVI purposes, etc, but this is the first we're seeing at least publicly of creating a 3D window manager around it. Harsha Manjula Mallikarjun of Bosch has talked about their work in developing a middleware framework for a 3D window manager that is making use of Wayland's Weston library, libweston. The window manager maps client buffers to 3D shapes like cubes and cylinders.
  • MESA_program_binary_formats Added To The OpenGL Registry
    Intel developers have seen their MESA_program_binary_formats extension added to the official OpenGL registry. The extension is really quite simple and just documents the unique format designator to be used by Mesa for ARB_get_program_binary/OES_get_program_binary extensions. Overnight it was merged into the OpenGL Registry.

Software: Nuclide, QEMU, Mailspring, GNOME Calendar and To Do, LibreOffice

  • Nuclide – An Open IDE for Mobile and Web Development
    It wasn’t too long ago that we wrote about an IDE that was developed by adding support for advanced debugging and development functions to Atom text editor to create Atom-IDE. We’ve got another such application for you today and it goes by the name of Nuclide. Nuclide is a free Electron-based IDE created by combining a collection of Atom’s features to provide IDE-like functions for several programming languages and technologies.
  • “Improving the performance of the qcow2 format” at KVM Forum 2017
    I was in Prague last month for the 2017 edition of the KVM Forum. There I gave a talk about some of the work that I’ve been doing this year to improve the qcow2 file format used by QEMU for storing disk images. The focus of my work is to make qcow2 faster and to reduce its memory requirements.
  • QEMU and function keys (follow-up)
    Since I posted my suggestion for QEMU a few weeks ago, I've learned a few things about QEMU. Thanks so much to the folks who contacted me via email to help me out. A brief review of my issue: I like to run FreeDOS in QEMU, on my Linux laptop. QEMU makes it really easy to boot FreeDOS or to test new installations. During our run up to the FreeDOS 1.2 release, I tested every pre-release version by installing under QEMU.
  • Mailspring Email Client is now available as a Snap app
    The Mailspring email client is now available as a Snap application on Ubuntu and other Linux distros. The part-Electron, part C++ mail app works with most major email providers, lets you add multiple accounts, has fast mail searching, and offers some advanced features, like read receipts and quick reply templates.
  • The Road to 3.28: Calendar and To Do
    It’s been a long time with no news. I guess work and masters are really getting in the way… good news is that I’ll finish masters in 2 months, and will have some free time to devote to this beloved project. “Bad” news is that, after almost 6 years, I’ll finally take some time to have a real vacation. I’ll stay 3 weeks out of the loop in February, a time where I’ll be traveling to the other side of the world, watching the sunset at the beach with my wife. Without a computer. While it’s unfortunate to the community, I think this time is necessary for my mental health – I’ve gone way too many times through the almost-burned-out state recently.
  • LIBREOFFICE MASCOT SURVEY: THE PROGRESS SO FAR
    As you’ve no doubt seen, over the last few months we’ve been looking for a LibreOffice mascot. This is just something fun for our community to use, for instance on T-shirts at events, so it doesn’t have to be ultra slick and professional – it isn’t a replacement for the official branding and logos that we use in the software, website and marketing materials. At the start, we asked for your submissions and received over 300 of them – thank you so much to everyone who contributed! Many of them were excellent, but we had to remove quite a few from the following voting round for various reasons (such as potential copyright issues, conflicts with other FOSS projects, and use of the official LibreOffice document logo). If your submission didn’t make it to the voting round, we still really appreciate your input, and we apologies if we didn’t make it clearer why some didn’t get through!