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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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development releases

Filed under
Linux
  • Ubuntu 8.04 Beta Released

  • Announcing openSUSE 11.0 Alpha 3
  • Mandriva 2008.1 RC 2 Released

Harald Welte and Groklaw announced as winners of the FSF's annual free software awards

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org: The Free Software Foundation (FSF) announced the recipients of its Award for Projects of Social Benefit and its Award for the Advancement of Free Software. Groklaw received the social benefit award, and Harald Welte received the advancement award. FSF president Richard Stallman handed out the awards at the conclusion of the FSF's annual associate members meeting in Cambridge, MA.

Mod Your PC for Triple Boot: a PC for All Seasons

Filed under
HowTos

popsci.com: Lucky you; you just received a brand new shiny PC. Unfortunately, your new rig almost certainly came preinstalled with Windows Vista. What’s a poor Vista PC to do? Simple: a triple boot super PC.

Reiser Fumbling: 'I Am Not Consistent In My Thinking'

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: The Hans Reiser murder trial resumed here Wednesday with the defendant fumbling on the witness stand. "Are you just making these things up?" Alameda County prosecutor Paul Hora asked at one point.

15 years in the making, Wine 1.0 is in sight

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux.com: For far longer than any of its developers would care to recall, Wine, the best program to use in Linux to run Windows applications, has been in development. Now, at long last, Wine 1.0 is scheduled to be released.

Are Windows, the MacOS, and Desktop Linux Obsolete?

Filed under
OS

Rob Enderle: Major worldwide economic problems often speed up transitions as models that are failing are forced to fail more quickly, and emerging models that have significant economic advantages (they’re cheaper) get a substantial boost. We are entering such a time.

Grokking open source

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: "Grok" is a word that you may not know, but it has been in use since the 1960's. It is commonly taken to mean "understand" but it is so much more than that. Do you grok open source? The word is the key to understanding why talented developers give of their time.

KolourPaint: More than a Microsoft Paint clone

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Just as Microsoft Paint is included with every Windows installation, so KolourPaint has been part of the kdegraphics package since KDE 3.3. This simple raster graphics editor works well not only in KDE, but also in Xfce, GNOME, and Fluxbox.

some howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • References on using the GIMP

  • OpenLDAP installation on Debian
  • burn DVD images with Dvd+rw-tools
  • Bash Scripting : The Importance Of A Sanity Check
  • Guide to Playstation Emulator on Ubuntu
  • Convert hexadecimal to binary in Perl

Review: PcLinuxOS 2008 "MiniMe"

Filed under
PCLOS

raiden.net: It's been nearly ten months since we last reviewed a PcLinuxOS release. This time around we have a brand new flavor to look at. The venerable "MiniMe" 2008 release. What's different about this version over the previous 2007 version? Let's have a look and find out..

Novell chief: We helped Microsoft be more open

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

zdnet.co.uk: Speaking to the Novell boss at his company's annual BrainShare user conference in Salt Lake City, Utah, ZDNet.co.uk asked whether the Microsoft deal could actually be damaging in the long run and what effect a financial downturn could have on Novell's recent recovery.

Ivan Krstić Resigns from OLPC

Filed under
OLPC

Ivan Krstić: "I cannot subscribe to the organization’s new aims or structure in good faith, nor can I reconcile them with my personal ethic. Having exhausted other options, three weeks ago I resigned my post at OLPC."

Radeon vs. RadeonHD Drivers In H1'08

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: For Linux distribution vendors, right now is proving to be an awkward time for them as they decide which ATI driver will ship as the default choice in their spring distribution refresh.

Suse Linux Enterprise 11 – Lean, Mean and Green!

Filed under
SUSE

itwire.com: Novell announces development plans for the next generation of Suse Linux, promising mission-critical abilities in a power-friendly package.

Is the growth of open source sustainable?

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: Fellow OStatic blogger Joe Brockmeier posits that "the open source model allows agile development by disperse groups of people that can build on the already massive foundation of open source libraries and applications." While I agree that open source projects are springing up in record numbers, I hope it also remains a community that can sustain itself and ultimately deliver what it promises.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 14

Filed under
SUSE

Issue 14 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Videos and Slides from FOSDEM 2008, openSUSE to Participate in Google Summer of Code 2008, Novell Free Hugs at CeBit 2008, LimeJeOS - the openSUSE-based JeOS is Born, and openSUSE 11.0 Alpha 3 (today).

Waiting on the HP Linux desktop

Filed under
SUSE

desktoplinux.com: I would have liked to have been able to tell you in great detail exactly what desktops and laptops will soon be coming from Hewlett-Packard equipped with SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10. I'd like to tell you, but HP is still holding its Linux desktop cards close to its chest and not revealing any details. This is very annoying.

Microsoft ‘tax’ on Linux in schools must end says Becta

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

computerworlduk: Dr Stephen Lucey joined Becta in 2000 and is now their Executive Director (Strategic Technologies). Becta is the Government organisation with oversight of all things ICT in UK schools. Becta has consistently maintained an interest and a monitoring brief on the progress of Open Source software in education and this interview explores some of their current thinking.

My Linux Experience

Filed under
Linux

amassedlust.com: Linux is a “your mileage may vary” kind of operating system. Choice is great. I have a great deal of choices in Linux… but sometimes I have so many that it just ruins the experience for me.

Managing Your Tasks with Tux ToDo

Filed under
Software

scottnesbitt.net: Keeping track of all of your tasks can be a chore. It is very easy to forget a deadline or to let a little job slip through the cracks. That is where good task management software comes in handy.

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