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About Tux Machines

Friday, 20 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Digitimes Research: Global tablet shipments to rise in 2Q14 Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 3:26pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.14.2 Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 3:24pm
Story Red Hat to buy storage software maker Inktank for $175 mln Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 3:10pm
Story Presence of Chromebooks in businesses grows with recent deals Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 1:47pm
Blog entry Is Nokia Really Dying? Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 11:16am
Story UBUNTU 14.10 UTOPIC UNICORN RELEASE SCHEDULE Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 10:57am
Story Ubuntu Tweak 0.8.7 Review – The Best Way to Configure Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 9:39am
Story Updated OpenOffice 'good news for administrations Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 9:32am
Story Canonical's audacious Ubuntu for Android project isn't quite dead, but it is in limbo Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 8:53am
Story Intel Ultrabook Benchmarks On The Linux 3.15 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 30/04/2014 - 8:09am

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • KOffice 2.0 Beta 2 Released

  • Qt Gets Prettied Up
  • First look: Mozilla's mobile Fennec browser
  • Bill Gates founds a new tech company
  • Pidgin 2.5.1 (GNOME)
  • Open Source to the Rescue
  • Support the Free Software Foundation’s high-priority list campaign
  • On Opera patch day, a new zero-day flaw
  • Hands on: Toshiba NB100 netbook review
  • Van Dam Iron Works vacillates between Linux and Windows
  • Memory issues: Firefox 3.0.2 and Mandriva 2008.1
  • Screencast: gnome-do v0.5 for Fedora 10
  • Open Source Gets Into Wall St. Back Office
  • SilverStone Sugo SG04 (pc case)
  • Open shop on GNOME 3.0 planning
  • Straightening Out Some Silly Stuff Being Written About Apple v. Psystar

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Hands-on Hadoop for cluster computing

  • How to Convert .FLAC to .MP3 In Ubuntu
  • Awesome-menu in Awesome Window Manager
  • Multiple keyboard layouts in XFCE... and outside it
  • Performance tuning with System Control (sysctl) in Ubuntu
  • Adjust the fan speed on you NVida graphics card
  • Using bootchart to capture your boot process openSUSE 11
  • HOWTO : Penguinzilla (DRBL) on Ubuntu 8.04.1
  • Kubuntu Intrepid Dual Monitor Blinking
  • Changing Default OS On Dual-Boot System (Ubuntu)

Microsoft's global anti-user day

Filed under
Microsoft

fsf.org/blogs: Software companies like Microsoft often refer to copying they don't approve of as "piracy." They suggest that such copying is ethically equivalent to murder and robbery. Even these far-fetched analogies are not enough for Microsoft, who in their press release yesterday updated the comparison to draw a connection between such copying and organized crime.

The compelling economics of Linux: What it means for the future of computing

Filed under
Linux

Jim Zemlin: Today the Linux Foundation issued a report looking at the value of the Linux platform in terms of code. Although it wasn’t specifically covered in this paper it is also worth applying the economics of Linux to one of the fastest growing segments of technology; mobile devices, consumer electronics and low cost netbooks. This is the future of Linux.

Intrepid Gets Ready with Two More System Tools

Filed under
Ubuntu

quicktweaks.com: Canonical, the distributor of Ubuntu OS, is often blamed for not listening the community such as ignoring the request for changing/improving default appearance. But not this time. Ever since they launched brainstorm.ubuntu.com, they have been very responsive about what the Ubuntu fans want. As a result of this Intrepid Ibex, which is due to release on 30th of this month, will be packed with two very useful system tools.

7 Linux Tools For A Better Google Experience

Filed under
Software

hehe2.net: Google has changed our lives permanently, no one can deny it. The amount of innovation it brings to the table is almost dizzying. Here you will find some great apps and tools that will generally improve your experience on your preferred Linux desktop.

Linux.conf.au hits domain disaster

Filed under
Linux
Web

zdnet.com.au: The website of Australia's annual Linux conference has become temporarily inaccessible scant months before the event because of policy confusion over whether or not it is allowed to use its long-standing domain name.

Netbook runs Debian on China-made CPU

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: A Chinese vendor of microprocessors and computer systems will reportedly soon ship a low-cost "netbook" with an 8.9-inch display, Debian Linux-based software, and a Chinese-made processor.

Enhance Your Clipboard with a Clipboard Manager

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: The clipboard system in Linux (X11 to be more specific) recives complaints from users who expect it to work differently when applications are closed. The problem is that when content is copied from an application and the application is closed, the clipboard item will be cleared. I ran into this problem recently.

Intrepid Lands On My Workstation

Filed under
Ubuntu

thelinuxlink.net: Yeah, I know it is still a few days off from official release, but true to form, I grabbed it for my workstation at work before the rush. I simply changed my /etc/apt/source.list to point from hardy to intrepid, sudo aptitude update, sudo aptitude dist-upgrade and about an hour later I was rebooting.

Think Firefox 3 is fast? Try Firefox Minefield

Filed under
Moz/FF

news.cnet: A colleague today showed me a cool, new browser that he's been using to browse the web at blisteringly fast speeds. The browser? Minefield. The author of the code? Mozilla.

Simply Mepis 8 Keeps Getting Better

Filed under
Linux

preacherpen.wordpress: Linux powers both of my computers, and Simply Mepis is the distribution of choice for many reasons. I have been using Simply Mepis several years, and and have no desire to even test other distros; there were some brief stints with Linux Mint and PCLOS, but Mepis is my OS.

Definitive Ubuntu 8.10 artwork

Filed under
Ubuntu

celettu.wordpress: I decided to beat the rush and install the Beta of Ubuntu 8.10 this evening. At first I was greeted with the Beta artwork, which I found slightly disappointing, as have others before me.

Open source - it's all about choice

Filed under
OSS

stuff.co.nz: There have always been people in society who help others just because they can - the cub scout leader, the charity volunteer, the community clean up group, they all contribute to making the world a better place.

Using Gmusicbrowser takes a lot of getting used to

Filed under
Software

newlinuxuser.com: Rhythmbox is the default on Ubuntu and these days I find VLC’s user interface too limited when it comes to playing music files. I’d rather stick with Rhythmbox.

9 tips for Ubuntu notebook users

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntukungfu.org/blog: Here are some tips for Ubuntu users who use notebook computers, including how to sync files effortlessly between a laptop and desktop, how to switch CPU speeds on the fly from the desktop, how to power-save your hard disk, and more.

STUX 2.0 exhibits major improvements

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: STUX 2.0, released last month, is a remarkable improvement from the 0.9.2 release I reviewed a couple years ago. While the look and feel of the Slackware-based distribution have stayed pretty much the same, STUX lacks the glaring technical problems that made it unusable on the previous occasion.

Linux Creator Linus Torvalds, Others Honored In Silicon Valley

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: The Computer History Museum Tuesday night honored three legends in the industry, including Linux-creator Linus Torvalds whose operating system became the catalyst for the open-source software movement that challenged traditional concepts of intellectual property.

Debian Lenny Slogan Contest

Filed under
Linux

ducea.com: The Debian Art team is seeking a slogan for the next stable release, Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 “Lenny”.

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 3 Now Available

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The openSUSE Project is proud to announce the availability of beta 3 of the 11.1 release. It’s a few days late, but much better for the delay. Beta 3 is now available for immediate download and testing.

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More in Tux Machines

Docker 1.13, Containers, and DevOps

  • Introducing Docker 1.13
    Today we’re releasing Docker 1.13 with lots of new features, improvements and fixes to help Docker users with New Year’s resolutions to build more and better container apps. Docker 1.13 builds on and improves Docker swarm mode introduced in Docker 1.12 and has lots of other fixes. Read on for Docker 1.13 highlights.
  • Docker 1.13 Officially Released, Docker for AWS and Azure Ready for Production
    Docker announced today the general availability of Docker 1.13, the third major update of the open-source application container engine for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems. Docker 1.13 has been in development for the past couple of months, during which it received no less than seven RC (Release Candidate) versions that implemented numerous improvements for the new Swarm Mode introduced in Docker 1.12, a few security features, as well as a new Remote API (version 1.25) and Client.
  • Distributed Fabric: A New Architecture for Container-Based Applications
    There’s a palpable sense of excitement in the application development world around container technology. Containers bring a new level of agility and speed to app development, giving developers the ability to break large monolithic apps into small, manageable microservices that can talk to one another, be more easily tested and deployed, and operate more efficiently as a full application. However, containers also demand a new architecture for the application services managing these microservices and apps, particularly in regards to service discovery — locating and consuming the services of those microservices.
  • DevOps trends emerging for 2017 and beyond
    Finally, one of the biggest trends for 2017 will not be just a focus on engaging and implementing some of these DevOps best practices into your enterprise, but a sweeping adoption of the DevOps/agile culture. This is because one of the most important – if not the absolute most key –tenets to a successful DevOps organization is culture. The enterprises that most espouse the shared responsibility, the empowered autonomous teams, the can-do attitudes, and the continuous learning environment in which DevOps thrives will see the biggest benefits.

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Optimizing Linux for Slow Computers
    It’s interesting, to consider what constitutes a power user of an operating system. For most people in the wider world a power user is someone who knows their way around Windows and Microsoft Office a lot, and can help them get their print jobs to come out right. For those of us in our community, and in particular Linux users though it’s a more difficult thing to nail down. If you’re a LibreOffice power user like your Windows counterpart, you’ve only really scratched the surface. Even if you’ve made your Raspberry Pi do all sorts of tricks in Python from the command line, or spent a career shepherding websites onto virtual Linux machines loaded with Apache and MySQL, are you then a power user compared to the person who knows their way around the system at the lower level and has an understanding of the kernel? Probably not. It’s like climbing a mountain with false summits, there are so many layers to power usership. So while some of you readers will be au fait with your OS at its very lowest level, most of us will be somewhere intermediate. We’ll know our way around our OS in terms of the things we do with it, and while those things might be quite advanced we’ll rely on our distribution packager to take care of the vast majority of the hard work.
  • Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years
    In this presentation, kernel hacker Jan Lübbe will explain why apparently reasonable approaches to long-term maintenance fail and how to establish a sustainable workflow instead.
  • Linux 4.9 Is the Next Long-Term Supported Kernel Branch, Says Greg Kroah-Hartman
    Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman confirmed today, January 19, 2017, in a short message, on his Google+ page, that the Linux 4.9 branch is now marked as "longterm," or as some of you know as LTS (Long-Term Support). The story behind Linux kernel 4.9 becoming the next long-term supported series dates from way before it's launch last month, on December 11, when Linus Torvalds officially announced the new branch. It all started back on August 12, 2016, when Greg Kroah-Hartman dropped a quick Google+ post to say "4.9 == next LTS kernel."
  • Maintainers Don't Scale
    First let’s look at how the kernel community works, and how a change gets merged into Linus Torvalds’ repository. Changes are submitted as patches to mailing list, then get some review and eventually get applied by a maintainer to that maintainer’s git tree. Each maintainer then sends pull request, often directly to Linus. With a few big subsystems (networking, graphics and ARM-SoC are the major ones) there’s a second or third level of sub-maintainers in. 80% of the patches get merged this way, only 20% are committed by a maintainer directly. Most maintainers are just that, a single person, and often responsible for a bunch of different areas in the kernel with corresponding different git branches and repositories. To my knowledge there are only three subsystems that have embraced group maintainership models of different kinds: TIP (x86 and core kernel), ARM-SoC and the graphics subsystem (DRM).

Graphics in Linux

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Has Geometry Shader Support For Testing
    David Airlie has published a set of 31 patches for testing that provide initial support for geometry shaders within the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver. While RadeonSI has long supported geometry shaders, it's been a bigger work item bringing it to this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver within Mesa. The patches are enough for Vulkan geometry shaders to get working on RADV, but Airlie explains that the support isn't gold: "This is a first pass at geometry shader support on radv, all the code should be here in reviewable pieces, it seems to mostly pass CTS tests but triggers some llvm 3.9 bugs around kill, and there might still be a GPU hang in here, but this should still be a good place to start reviewing."
  • libinput 1.6.0
    This release fixes the slow touchpad acceleration on touchpads with less than 1000dpi, a missing call to normalized the deltas was the source of the issue.
  • Libinput 1.6 Released With New Touchpad Acceleration
    Libinput 1.6.0 was announced a short time ago on wayland-devel.
  • Mesa 17 Gets a First Release Candidate, Final Planned for Early February 2017
    Collabora's Emil Velikov announced today, January 19, 2017, the availability of the first of many Release Candidate (RC) development versions of the upcoming and highly anticipated Mesa 17.0.0 3D Graphics Library. Mesa 17 is shaping up to be a huge milestone that should dramatically improve the performance of the bundled open-source graphics drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, Nvidia graphics cards on a Linux-based operating system. Just the other day it enabled OpenGL 4.5 support for Intel Haswell GPUs, which is already a big achievement.

Android Leftovers

  • Donald Trump has surrendered his Android phone
    Donald Trump has given up his beloved Android phone ahead of today’s inauguration, the Associated Press reports, though it is unclear what type of device he will use in the White House. According to The New York Times, Trump is now using a more secure, encrypted handset that was approved by the Secret Service. He also has a different phone number, the Times reports, citing people close to the president-elect. Trump doesn’t use email, but he does use his Android phone to tweet. He’s also been very accessible throughout the presidential campaign and transition, taking calls from reporters, politicians, and world leaders. Malcolm Turnbull, the prime minister of Australia, called Trump to congratulate him on his electoral victory after getting his cellphone number from professional golfer Greg Norman.
  • Best affordable Android smartphones you can buy [January 2017]
    There are new smartphones hitting the market constantly, but which is the best to pick up when you’re trying to save a buck or two? We’ve seen some great launches this summer and we’re only expecting more over the coming months, but for now, let’s go over the best affordable Android smartphones you can go pick up today…
  • A list of every Samsung phone getting Android 7.0 Nougat this year
  • WatchMaker to support Gear S2 & Gear S3, 1000s of watchfaces incoming
    WatchMaker, a popular Android and Android Wear watchface platform, has some good news for our readers. They are currently in the process of expanding their supported platforms and will be targeting Tizen and its latest wearable smartwatches, the Samsung Gear S2 and Gear S3.