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About Tux Machines

Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NVIDIA Optimus Linux Power Battery Tests Rianne Schestowitz 23/12/2013 - 7:22am
Story Linux Mint 16 “Petra” KDE released! Rianne Schestowitz 23/12/2013 - 5:15am
Story New SteamOS Build Updates the Intel Graphics Stack Rianne Schestowitz 22/12/2013 - 9:28pm
Story Epiphany 3.11.2 Web Browser Brings Lots of Goodies for Christmas Rianne Schestowitz 22/12/2013 - 6:25pm
Story Today's Howtos and Software Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2013 - 6:08pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 2013--An Old Friend Revisited gfranken 6 22/12/2013 - 4:16pm
Story Reiser4 Is Now Available For The Linux 3.12 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 22/12/2013 - 3:59pm
Story Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS Alpha 1 (Trusty Tahr) Officially Released – Screenshot Tour Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2013 - 12:28pm
Story Opinion: Steam and DRM Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2013 - 12:21pm
Story Jolicloud 2 offers a one-stop shop to your social and Cloud storage accounts Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2013 - 12:19pm

The Man Behind Ubuntu: Talking with Mark Shuttleworth

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Ubuntu Linux Magazine spends some time with the man who made Ubuntu, arguably the most popular desktop Linux distribution, possible. Kristin Shoemaker finds out what makes Mark tick, and what’s going on with the Shuttleworth Foundation.

A visit to the linux shop

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linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: I saw yet another article posted by someone who apparently has nothing better to do than beat dead horses. The view espoused by so many bloggers and other 'writers' who cannot come to terms with the number and volume of distros available, that somehow there are 'too many', is akin to that of a child who complains in a candy store that because he or she cannot make up their mind.

few howtos:

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  • Postfix Configuration for Ubuntu, CentOS and OpenSuse

  • Create and Delete windows shares from Linux
  • Variable MultiLine Spacing With Sed On Linux Or Unix

Am I the Only One Who Thinks Xandros Buying Linspire was a Good Move?

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Linux I hear the former CEO of Linspire said it’s going to ruin the company, because the shares will become worthless. But for us users, what we’re going to see, is a new direction for the not-so-popular Click ‘n’ Run and maybe even a new, merged distribution?

Software Firm Is Open for Innovation

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Interviews MYSQL chief Marten Mickos isn't afraid his rivals in the database-software industry will ever overtake him. "Let them try," he says. "Our secret is in the way we operate our culture, and I'm convinced others cannot imitate that."

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 260

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Commentary: Linux in the first half or 2008

  • Debian GNU/Linux - the new "Number One" distribution
  • News: Gentoo Linux 2008.0, Ubuntu in Assemblée nationale, Xandros acquires Linspire, alpha PC-BSD 7 with KDE 4.1, OpenBSD 4.4 beta tagged, Ikki Boot live CD
  • Released last week: Gentoo Linux 2008.0, Sabayon Linux 3.5
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.1 roadmap
  • Donations: MythDora receives US$500.00
  • New distributions: CentralPointe Server, DAVIX, wattOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Who Will Win As Linux Market Consolidates?

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Linux Two small Linux companies are merging. What does it mean to Linux market leaders like Red Hat, Novell and Ubuntu — and Linux customers? Here are some clues from The VAR Guy.

Linux conference calls for papers

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Linux The fact that organising Australia's national Linux conference is fully a year's work has been brought home with the announcement by the organisers of LCA 2009, or as it is better known, that ideas for papers can be submitted.

AltSearch for OOo Writer functionality trumps first impressions

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OOo Alternative Find and Replace for Writer (AltSearch) has the ambitious goal of replacing and enhancing one of the most basic pieces of functionality. It's undermined by a chaotic interface, but if you have the patience to continue past first impressions, you will find AltSearch comes far closer to fulfilling its promise than you might initially imagine

Linux for housewives. XP for geeks.

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blogs.zdnet: Retailers and contract manufacturers in Taiwan say that novice PC users there, like students and housewives, tend to buy the Linux version of the Eee PC701, while geeks go for Windows XP. Does that sound backwards?

Why Aren’t All Linux Live CDs Customizable?

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Linux I don’t use Linux as my operating system, but I do have several Linux live CDs. The problem that I always have with live CDs for Linux is that when they’re built, they include things I would never include. Or, they don’t put in things that I feel I should have. At Custom NimbleX, you can easily create your own customized version of Linux.

Move Your Business from Windows to Linux

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Linux Making the switch from Windows to Linux will incur some costs as employees and support staff adjust to the new system's configuration settings, utilities, and applications. Even so, the savings in future hardware and software upgrades could be huge.

A Journey to Ubuntu

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Ubuntu My first Linux installation took place circa 1992, I pulled my hair out for a month or so while I was trying to figure out how to install this very interesting and FREE operating system. Wow, Linux has gone a long way since my first install.

The Swiss Army Distro - Might Someone Finally Be Getting It?

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Linux One of the things that's bothered me to no end for quite a while is the ridiculously huge number of Linux distributions out there. 350+ active or semi-active and nearly 200 dead distros is rather pathetic in my opinion. It would not be hard at all to merge all of those distributions into one "jack of all trades" distribution.

Fedora 9: Was it worth the wait?

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Linux As many of you know, a while back I was converted to Ubuntu. Currently running (happily I might add) Ubuntu 7.10, I have had no need to return to my Red Hat roots. Of course being a writer in this industry, it behoves me to make sure I am up to date on the latest, greatest software. So I decided it was necessary that I install Fedora 9.

few more howtos:

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  • Rename Files in Bulk from the Command Line

  • Nautilus search
  • Adding a service in Fedora

Gentoo Linux 2008.0

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Gentoo In recent times the Gentoo Linux and its foundation has been plagued with a multitude of problems and times have certainly been challenging for this once popular distribution. It's already July and we are now finally seeing Gentoo's first official release of the year.

KDE 3 vs KDE 4: It’s Finally Over

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jonreagan.wordpress: Recently there has been quite a karfuffle surrounding several people’s disagreement over the direction of KDE 4. As many of you know, KDE 4 is not yet complete, and is far different from it’s ancestor, KDE 3. The arguments have seemingly quieted down, and finally there has been some closure on the debate.

Buddi - Simple Personal Budgeting

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Software Many financial applications, such as KMyMoney, can be very useful, however there is often quite a learning curve associated with them. Buddi is an open source personal budgeting application for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X that is designed to keep things very simple.

The Linux Saga: Preface

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Linux This story begins – as usual – long long time ago, far far away, behind the Ocean, in United States of America, in Bell Laboratories building. In that firm a computer stood. Nothing special about it, but in 1969, when those events started, computer wasn’t commonplace at all. There were no Personal Computers, no Microsoft, IBM or Apple.

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Security News

  • How your DVR was hijacked to help epic cyberattack
    Technology experts warned for years that the millions of Internet-connected "smart" devices we use every day are weak, easily hijacked and could be turned against us. The massive siege on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors and routes Internet traffic, shows those ominous predictions are now a reality. An unknown attacker intermittently knocked many popular websites offline for hours Friday, from Amazon to Twitter and Netflix to Etsy. How the breach occurred is a cautionary tale of the how the rush to make humdrum devices “smart” while sometimes leaving out crucial security can have major consequences.
  • Find Out If One of Your Devices Helped Break the Internet
    Security experts have been warning for years that the growing number of unsecured Internet of Things devices would bring a wave of unprecedented and catastrophic cyber attacks. Just last month, a hacker publicly released malware code used in a record-breaking attack that hijacked 1.5 million internet-connected security cameras, refrigerators, and other so-called “smart” devices that were using default usernames and passwords. On Friday, the shit finally hit the fan.
  • Once more, with passion: Fingerprints suck as passwords
    Fingerprints aren’t authentication. Fingerprints are identity. They are usernames. Fingerprints are something public, which is why it should really bother nobody with a sense of security that the FBI used them to unlock seized phones. You’re literally leaving your fingerprints on every object you touch. That makes for an abysmally awful authentication token.
  • Strengthen cyber-security with Linux
    Using open source software is a viable and proven method of combatting cyber-crime It’s encouraging to read that the government understands the seriousness of the loss of $81 million dollars via the hacking of Bangladesh Bank, and that a cyber-security agency is going to be formed to prevent further disasters. Currently, information security in each government department is up to the internal IT staff of that department.
  • Canonical announces live kernel patching for Ubuntu
    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has announced that it will provide a live kernel patching services for version 16.04 which was released in April.
  • Everything you know about security is wrong
    If I asked everyone to tell me what security is, what do you do about it, and why you do it. I wouldn't get two answers that were the same. I probably wouldn't even get two that are similar. Why is this? After recording Episode 9 of the Open Source Security Podcast I co-host, I started thinking about measuring a lot. It came up in the podcast in the context of bug bounties, which get exactly what they measure. But do they measure the right things? I don't know the answer, nor does it really matter. It's just important to keep this in mind as in any system, you will get exactly what you measure. [...] If you have 2000 employees, 200 systems, 4 million lines of code, and 2 security people, that's clearly a disaster waiting to happen. If you have 20, there may be hope. I have no idea what the proper ratios should be, if you're willing to share ratios with me I'd love to start collecting data. As I said, I don't have scientific proof behind this, it's just something I suspect is true.
  • Home Automation: Coping with Insecurity in the IoT
    Reading Matthew Garret’s exposés of home automation IoT devices makes most engineers think “hell no!” or “over my dead body!”. However, there’s also the siren lure that the ability to program your home, or update its settings from anywhere in the world is phenomenally useful: for instance, the outside lights in my house used to depend on two timers (located about 50m from each other). They were old, loud (to the point the neighbours used to wonder what the buzzing was when they visited) and almost always wrongly set for turning the lights on at sunset. The final precipitating factor for me was the need to replace our thermostat, whose thermistor got so eccentric it started cooling in winter; so away went all the timers and their loud noises and in came a z-wave based home automation system, and the guilty pleasure of having an IoT based home automation system. Now the lights precisely and quietly turn on at sunset and off at 23:00 (adjusting themselves for daylight savings); the thermostat is accessible from my phone, meaning I can adjust it from wherever I happen to be (including Hong Kong airport when I realised I’d forgotten to set it to energy saving mode before we went on holiday). Finally, there’s waking up at 3am to realise your wife has fallen asleep over her book again and being able to turn off her reading light from your alarm clock without having to get out of bed … Automation bliss!

Microsoft Corruption, Rejections, and Struggles

  • Microsoft licensing corruption scandal in Romania has ended on October 3rd
    This scandal covers buying Microsoft licensees for Romanian administration from 2004 to 2012 for total 228 millions USD. During the investigation was found that more than 100 people, former ministers, mayor of Bucuresti and businessman are involved in this corruption scandal and more than 20 millions euro are paid as bribes.
  • 49ers Colin Kaepernick, Chip Kelly review Microsoft Surface tablets, which Bill Belichick is ‘done’ using
    Ranting about Microsoft’s unreliable, sideline tablets is not a top priority for 49ers coach Chip Kelly and quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not with a five-game losing streak in tow for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. But both Kelly and Kaepernick confirmed this week that they’ve experienced problems with the Microsoft Surface tablets. They’re just not as fed up with them as New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, who’s lambasted the imperfect technology for years and finally declared this week: “I’m done with the tablets.”
  • Windows: When no growth is an improvement
    Research firms like IDC and Gartner have continued to forecast contraction, not expansion, in the PC business. Only when enterprise migrations to Windows 10 kick into gear do analysts see a reversal of the industry’s historic slump. That isn’t expected to happen until next year.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" & 8.15 "Nev" Receive Latest Debian Security Updates

After releasing the first Test build of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system a couple of days ago, today, October 23, 2016, the Parsix GNU/Linux development team announced the availability of new security updates for all supported Parsix GNU/Linux releases. Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" is the current stable release of the Debian-based operating system, and it relies on the Debian Stable (Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie") software repositories. On the other hand Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" is the next major version, which right now is in development, but receives the same updates as the former. Read more