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Tuesday, 23 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ACPI, kernels and contracts with firmware Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 11:11pm
Story Canonical Partners with AMD for Ubuntu OpenStack Cloud Server Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 9:13pm
Story Docker Raises $40M in Series C Financing to Drive Open Source Adoption Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:44pm
Story Open Source Fix For US Voting System ? Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:40pm
Story Expanding Reach in Asia: Telenor Group Brings Firefox OS Smartphones to Bangladesh Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:36pm
Story Android One phones launch in India Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:30pm
Story Valve Begins Publicly Tracking AMD Catalyst Linux Issues Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:19pm
Story Flowhub Kickstarter delivery Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:14pm
Story Windows vs Linux: Which OS is best for your business? Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:11pm
Story Digia spins off Qt as subsidiary Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 4:57pm

The new faces of Linux - Feeling the Power

Filed under
Linux

linuxlock.blogspot: GNU/Linux is too hard for the regular user... It doesn't give me the applications I need... Linux won't allow me to network with my Windows machines...

Linux Supports More Filesystems With 2.6.30-rc1

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Two weeks have passed since the release of the Linux 2.6.29 kernel that brought Intel kernel mode-setting, the Btrfs file-system, and many other improvements to the Linux kernel. Now though the first release candidate for the forthcoming Linux 2.6.30 kernel is now out in the wild.

Move over Rambo, this Penguin means business

Filed under
Gaming

downloadsquad.com: Clearly fed up with the penguin's generally soft and cuddly image, the lead character in Penguinz is Hell-bent on changing that perception. He's kicking ass and taking names.

10 Special Purpose Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: One of the several advantages of having many Linux distributions is that there is always one distribution that meets specific needs for a group of users with similar interests. Today we will share with you 10 such distributions.

Addressing the State of the Linux Union

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Linux stakeholders gather to celebrate the community's successes -- and to sort out some fundamental disagreements.

The Face of Aptitude

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: On the face of it aptitude, a Debian package manager looks like some RGB monitor and a file manager from Ms-dos.

Netflix loves/hates Linux

Filed under
Linux

dwasifar.com: The online mail-order DVD rental company Netflix launched an additional service a while back, whereby you can watch unlimited movies online. When I logged on to the Netflix site today, it offered a film about Linux. But you can’t watch it if you use Linux.

Linux Desktop Hardware Myths Explored

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

itmanagement.earthweb.com: Perhaps one of the most common myths surrounding desktop Linux is the belief that modern distributions do not provide decent hardware support.

Toshiba notebooks with OpenSolaris

Filed under
OS

h-online.com: Toshiba is now offering Sun's OpenSolaris 2008.11 pre-installed on some of their notebooks, following a deal completed in December.

The best looking Linux is nearly here - and it's not Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ubuntu Linux 9.04, otherwise known as Jaunty Jackalope, will be released later this month. Forget Windows 7, this is going to be the hottest operating software release of 2009. Yet, the muddy brown and orange theme doesn't do it for me which is why this time I'm eyeing off something else from Canonical's stable.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Testing Mandriva Spring

  • NVIDIA's Open-Source Driver Gets Updated
  • Feds release open-source NHIN gateway software
  • The Trouble With Webcams and Ubuntu Linux
  • Novell SUSE Linux, PlateSpin: So Happy Together?
  • Linux Mint 5 (Elyssa)
  • The true cost of migrating to open source
  • View Many Firefox Tabs at Once With Split Browser
  • Tomboy to be ported to C++ for real
  • Comux 001111
  • Mozilla Developers News 4/7
  • Why Don’t Linux-based Netbooks Have the Same H/W as Windows Ones?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Tutorial: An Introduction to Linux CLI

  • Howto: Create launchers using easy bash scripts
  • Install Codecs Flash JRE Without Internet In Ubuntu
  • Linux Determine which Services are Enabled at Boot
  • How to Install Hercules Classic Silver Webcam in Ubuntu
  • Preventing a service from starting on Debian or Ubuntu
  • OpenGL in Mandriva
  • Burning ISOs in CLI using OpenSUSE 11.1
  • File Synchronization with Rsync over SSH
  • Dropbox for Linux
  • lsof Seeks All Open Files

The Beginner's Guide to Linux Part 4: Introduction to the Terminal

Filed under
HowTos

maximumpc.com: Traditionally, most new users have always been reluctant to experiment with the command line interface. Once you understand the terminal, Linux will finally open up to you. The terminal is easily the most powerful part of a Linux system.

A new free antivirus for Unix/Linux platform

Filed under
Software

ubuntugeek.com: Today I’d like to introduce to you all a brand new antivirus for Unix/Linux platform from a famous company, BitDefender.

Linux desktop neglect

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: Why isn't Linux on more desktops? Here's the reason we don't talk about much: the Linux distributors don't encourage the Linux desktop.

Introducing KDE 4: Kontacts: Calendar (KOrganizer)

Filed under
KDE

introducingkde4.blogspot: Welcome to the third issue of the Kontact suit series. Today we'll give a look at the Calendar kpart (KOrganizer):

Wrist-mounted computer runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: Glacier Computer has announced a wearable computer that runs Linux and includes built-in WiFi along with GPS and Bluetooth options. The wrist-mounted "Ridgeline W200" has a 3.5-inch touchscreen display, backlit keys, a hot-swappable battery pack, and an electronic compass.

Mercurial vs Git

Filed under
Software

rg03.wordpress: There are many blog posts and articles all over the Internet providing comparissons between Git and Mercurial. Most of them only briefly describe the main differences and then try to decide which one is better. However, I didn’t find many articles explaining the differences in detail.

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    The app is called Smart Receipts, it's licensed AGPL 3.0, and the source code is available on GitHub for Android and iOS.
  • How the TensorFlow team handles open source support
    Open-sourcing is more than throwing code over the wall and hoping somebody uses it. I knew this in theory, but being part of the TensorFlow team at Google has opened my eyes to how many different elements you need to build a community around a piece of software.
  • IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot
    Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.