Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 18 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Firefox 4.0 Beta 5 Arrives

Filed under
Moz/FF

ghacks.net: As of this minute, the Mozilla servers are being filled with new Firefox 4.0 Beta 5 releases. The distribution has not been completed yet, and it is likely that it will take at least a few hours before the official announcement is being made over at the Mozilla website.

This is Why You Do It: Open Source Software Saves Charity

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: We love feel-good stories about how open source software helps improve living conditions in third-world countries or comes to the rescue in times of crisis, but this one really takes the cake.

Assessing the Tux Strength

Filed under
Linux
  • Assessing the Tux Strength: Part 1 - Userspace Memory Protection
  • Assessing the Tux Strength: Part 2 - Into the Kernel

Android/Linux kernel fight continues

Filed under
Linux
OSS

blogs.computerworld: You could argue that Google's Android, so popular on smartphones now, is the most popular Linux of all right now. There's only one little problem with that: Android has continued to be apart from the Linux mainstream.

Old Generals Never Die - They just Wear a Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: The Red Hat board of directors announced a new chairman Monday, August 30, to replace outgoing Matthew Szulik. Henry Hugh Shelton, retired Special Forces general, has been serving on the board since 2003 after leaving the elite Army division.

Schillix 0.7.1i released with Illumos underneath

Filed under
OS

h-online.com: The OpenSolaris distribution Schillix has released a version of its operating system which is based on the OpenSolaris fork Illumos.

Intel's Sandybridge Graphics On Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Back in February we reported on the first signs of open-source support for Intel's Sandybridge, a.k.a. their sixth-generation Intel graphics processor integrated on their upcoming CPUs.

How To Set Up Apache2 With mod_fcgid And PHP5 On OpenSUSE 11.3

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

This tutorial describes how you can install Apache2 with mod_fcgid and PHP5 on OpenSUSE 11.3. mod_fcgid is a compatible alternative to the older mod_fastcgi. It lets you execute PHP scripts with the permissions of their owners instead of the Apache user.

Mark Bohannon to Lead Red Hat Governmental Affairs and Public Policy

Filed under
Linux

marketwatch.com: Red Hat, Inc. today announced that Mark Bohannon will join the company as Vice President of Corporate Affairs and Global Public Policy on Oct. 1, 2010.

Migrating a Small Business To Linux

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: In a tight economy, it's more important than ever to make sure every dollar spent is providing maximum return. And for a growing number of small businesses, this means reexamining plans for upgrading existing servers and workstations.

Choices Choices Choices

Filed under
OS
Linux
  • Choices Choices Choices
  • Does Linux Come in Too Many Flavors?

How To Set Up Apache2 With mod_fcgid And PHP5 On Ubuntu 10.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial describes how you can install Apache2 with mod_fcgid and PHP5 on Ubuntu 10.04. mod_fcgid is a compatible alternative to the older mod_fastcgi. It lets you execute PHP scripts with the permissions of their owners instead of the Apache user.

Interview with GNOME co-founder Federico Mena

Filed under
Software
Interviews

omgubuntu.co.uk: I’m sure this legend doesn’t need too much introduction – Federico, along with Miguel de Icaza, worked together in the late 90s to start the GNOME project - the desktop environment that Ubuntu and many other distros use.

Even More Linux Distros That Don’t Suck

Filed under
Linux

tech.nocr.at: Following my first two distro lists; Linux Distros That Don’t Suck and More Linux Distros That Don’t Suck, I bring you the long awaited third installment in my distro lists; Even More Linux Distros That Don’t Suck.

Why Do We Love Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: When you're a fan of Linux, any blog post entitled "27 Good Reasons to Love Linux" is going to be impossible to resist. No wonder, then, that a recent post with just that title has created endless fodder for conversation in the Linux blogosphere of late.

Linux Mint Debian (201009) released

Filed under
Linux

linuxmint.com/blog: Today is very important for Linux Mint. It’s one day to remember in the history of our project as we’re about to maintain a new distribution, a rolling one, which promises to be faster, more responsive and on which we’re less reliant on upstream components.

"Saner Defaults" Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • "Saner Defaults" remix of Ubuntu beta released
  • A Quick Look at Ubuntu 10.10
  • Previewing and tweaking Ubuntu 10.10

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
HowTos

# Third beta of KDE PIM Suite uses Akonadi
# Using the HAVP anti-virus proxy to protect from web attacks
# Backports now an official Debian repository
# Install Compiz Anaglyph Plugin-real 3D screen/window in Ubuntu
# Is Microsoft Funding Anti-Google Investigation?
# Screen capture tour of Mandriva 2010 Spring installation
# Installing #Cherokee on #CentOS 5.5
# FOX Desktop and some graphical apps
# Get to know Linux: Using grep
# Wget: Manage network Bandwidth rate and Quota using Wget
# OpenMEEG: opensource software for quasistatic bioelectromagnetics
# Install Compiz Fusion And Extra Effects Ubuntu 10.10
# Fair, Reasonable And Non-Discriminatory...Ain't
# Linux and Breakfast Cereals
# Use SuperOS Repos in Ubuntu
# How to block Messengers using squid
# Open source projects under microscope
# 2 monitor radeon xorg.conf
# Open Innovation Awards 2010: List of Finalists
# Converseen- A mass images converter

10 Awesome Free Games for openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE
Gaming

omgsuse.com: Back in "ye olde days" of Linux, there were no games. If you wanted to entertain yourself, you either played nethack or you tried to compile Gentoo, neither of them terrifically fun. These days gaming on Linux is a completely different story.

Looking At The OpenCL Performance Of ATI & NVIDIA On Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: In this article we are looking more closely at the Open Computing Language performance of this GF104 graphics card as well as other NVIDIA and ATI graphics cards.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0.0 "ASCII"

When I am trying out a desktop distribution, what really tends to divide the field of Linux distributions in my mind is not whether the system uses MATE or Plasma, or whether the underlying package manager uses RPM or Deb files. What tends to leave a lasting impression with me is whether the desktop environment, its applications and controls feel like a cooperative, cohesive experience or like a jumble of individual tools that happen to be part of the same operating system. In my opinion Ubuntu running the Unity desktop and Linux Mint's Cinnamon desktop are good examples of the cohesive approach. The way openSUSE's administration tools work together provides another example. Like them or hate them, I think most people can see there is an overall design, a unifying vision, being explored with those distributions. I believe Devuan falls into the other category, presenting the user with a collection of utilities and features where some assembly is still required. This comes across in little ways. For example, many distributions ship Mozilla's Firefox web browser and the Thunderbird e-mail client together as a set, and they generally complement each other. Devuan ships Firefox, but then its counterpart is the mutt console e-mail program which feels entirely out of place with the rest of the desktop software. The PulseAudio sound mixing utility is included, but its system tray companion is not present by default. Even the system installer, which switches back and forth between graphical windows and a text console, feels more like a collection of uncoordinated prompts rather than a unified program or script. Some people may like the mix-and-match approach, but I tend to prefer distributions where it feels like the parts are fitted together to create a unified experience. What I found was that Devuan provided an experience where I had to stop and think about where items were or how I was going to use them rather than having the pieces seamlessly fit together. However, once I got the system set up in a way that was more to my liking, I appreciated the experience provided. Devuan offers a stable, flexible platform. Once I shaped the operating system a little, I found it to be fast, light and capable. Having a fairly large repository of software available along with Flatpak support provided a solid collection of applications on a conservative operating system foundation. It was a combination I liked. In short, I think Devuan has some rough edges and setting it up was an unusually long and complex experience by Linux standards. I certainly wouldn't recommend Devuan to newcomers. However, a day or two into the experience, Devuan's stability and performance made it a worthwhile journey. I think Devuan may be a good alternative to people who like running Debian or other conservative distributions such as Slackware. I suspect I may soon be running Devuan's Raspberry Pi build on my home server where its lightweight nature will be welcome. Read more Also: deepin 15.6 Released With New Features: Get This Beautiful Linux Distro Here

Android Leftovers

5 open source alternatives to Dropbox

Dropbox is the 800-pound gorilla of filesharing applications. Even it's a massively popular tool, you may choose to use an alternative. Maybe that's because you're dedicated to the open source way for all the good reasons, including security and freedom, or possibly you've been spooked by data breaches. Or perhaps the pricing plan doesn't work out in your favor for the amount of storage you actually need. Fortunately, there are a variety of open source filesharing applications out there that give you more storage, security, and control over your data at a far lower price than Dropbox charges. How much lower? Try free, if you're a bit tech savvy and have a Linux server to use. Read more

Android Leftovers