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Tuesday, 26 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Airdroid - Transfer Files Between Android Phones/Tablets and Linux (Any Distribution) Mohd Sohail 29/01/2015 - 9:10am
Story 7 reasons why I prefer elementary OS Freya over Ubuntu 14.10 "Utopic Unicorn" Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 7:53am
Story Don't Use Ubuntu, Use Mint - or elementary Rianne Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 7:50am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 1:14am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 1:13am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 1:12am
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 1:11am
Story New To Linux? Don’t Use Ubuntu, You’ll Probably Like Linux Mint Better Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 12:03am
Story IceCat 31.4.0 release Rianne Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 12:02am
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 11:51pm

Exploring Drupal V6 open source Website solution

Filed under
Linux

Exploring the benifits of building secure websites with Drupal V6.

De-Programming Windows Refugees

linuxtoday.com/blog: Way back in the last millennium, in the very olden days of Linux, most Linux users were grizzled old Unix graybeards. They saw Linux as a cute little toy Unix, but it was Free and free and fun. Now Linux is the easiest of all operating systems to use, and yet anguish abounds in the land. Too hard! Too hard! Make it easier! What the heck happened?

Ubuntu Linux - 5 things to stem the tide of Windows 7

Filed under
Ubuntu

sinaisix.blogspot: Come this October, Windows 7 will go on sale, and this release, I strongly believe will be one of the greatest challenges Linux will ever face. Ubuntu Linux will also make a release within that same time and given the generally positive reviews that Windows 7 has received, it is going to be a very difficult time for Canonical to market Ubuntu.

Game Review: Simon Tatham's Portable Puzzle Collection

Filed under
Gaming

penguinpetes.com: Casual puzzle games are the unsung champions of the modern game scene. The blockbuster titles get all the attention, and yet it's the simple solitaires and brain-teasers that are in every PC's menu, on every mobile phone, and bookmarked in every web browser.

GNOME Foundation releases first quarterly report

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: The GNOME Foundation, which coordinates development of the GNOME platform, has announced the release of its first quarterly report.

Firestarter: Simple to use, powerful desktop firewall

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: Every PC needs protection. Now with the Linux operating system you have a lot of choices for protection. But one of the easiest to use is Firestarter. Firestarter is one of the easiest-to-use firewalls I have used.

Pidgin vs. Empathy: Feature Comparison

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: The decision to replace Pidgin with Empathy in Ubuntu 9.10 has not been without controversy, or second thoughts on the part of Ubuntu developers. Much of the discontent centers around concerns that Empathy does not yet offer the features to compete with Pidgin.

Can Microsoft Ever Be Accepted by the Linux Community?

Filed under
Microsoft

earthweb.com: Once, the CEO of the company for which I worked had a bright idea. He would sponsor a young open source software coder for the summer, and, in return, the coder would assign the copyright of his application to the company.

Of Making Many Distros (or Remixes) There Is No End

Filed under
Linux

igneousquill.net: A Linux distro is essentially a collection of software applications built into a complete operating system on top of the Linux kernel. Some distros, like Ubuntu, openSUSE, Fedora, and Mandriva have companies that back them, while others, like Debian, do not.

FreeBSD Local Root Escalation Vulnerability

Filed under
Security
BSD

darknet.org.uk: It’s been a long time since we’ve heard about a problem with FreeBSD, partially because the mass of people using it isn’t that large and secondly because BSD tends to be pretty secure as operating systems go.

Virtual Hosting With PureFTPd And MySQL On Fedora 11

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a PureFTPd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine.

How To Install A Dual-Panel Nautilus For Gnome

Filed under
Linux

Not so long ago we discovered a simplified version of Nautilus which seems to miss Ubuntu Karmic after all so the only way to get it is through it's PPA. But still, one of the most requested features in Nautilus must be the dual-panel view, which gives you the ability to work in two directories at one. Sure, you can use tabs, but a dual panel Nautilus would be really useful.

15 "Really" Awesome Conky Configurations

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: After showing you how to install and configure conky, and then gave you the idea that you can display Twitter statuses on it, it's time for me to share to you some of the most highly-customized, unique, and awe-inspiring conky configurations.

Microsoft says "We are working on our Linux drivers"

Filed under
Microsoft

h-online.com: Microsoft has denied that it has stopped work on the Hyper-V drivers for Linux that it released in July. Greg Kroah-Hartman had noted in a recent status report on the state of Linux drivers that Microsoft had not responded to the over 200 patches that had been created to clean up Microsoft's code.

Will FSF's summit on women in FOSS achieve anything?

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: What a movement achieves depends greatly on the motivations behind it; when one is pushed to do something, then much less is achieved than if the movement arises spontaneously.

ARM Joins The Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org: The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced that ARM has become a member.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The CodePlex Foundation: First Impressions (and Recommendations)
  • LinuxCon Keynote Series: An Interview with IBM’s Bob Sutor
  • The Bluecurve Theme For GNOME
  • Indie Game Studio Amazed At Linux Sales
  • Break Free with gNewSense 2.3
  • REVIEW: Webconverger 5.5
  • Managing Linux and Mac Fileshares in Windows
  • Home smart grid system runs Linux
  • Linux botnet discovery points to lazy administrators
  • The Linux botweb story that wasn't ...
  • SpiceBird 0.7 – Strong bird to your fleet
  • Extra Extra: An Interview with Matthew Helmke
  • Gecko Edubook Running wattOS
  • The Internet at 40: What's next?
  • Google File System II stalked by open-source elephant
  • Good News, id Tech 5 Is Likely Coming To Linux
  • Karmic Gets New IM Session Status Icons (!)
  • Laurus Technologies Expands Reach with Red Hat Partnership
  • JAVAAAAAAARGH.
  • Flash Wins! Hoo-freaking-ray! Adobe are so awesome!
  • Apple opens Grand Central; challenges impede Linux adoption
  • Changing the World
  • Open-PC users choose KDE
  • Fixing libtool

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To: Configure Dual Display with ATI Radeon (fglrx)
  • Gentoo: Recovering from installing a bad kernel
  • Replace Network-Manager with WICD Ubuntu 9.04
  • Get ClearType like Smooth Fonts in Ubuntu Linux
  • How to remove,install and reconfigure xorg without reinstalling ubuntu
  • Setting up Differential Backups for Websites
  • Commandline Dependencies with gdebi
  • Access More Samba shares in KDE
  • Fine-grained cookie management in Firefox
  • Switch to OpenOffice.org
  • How to Use Digikam to Export Photos to Flickr, PicasaWeb, and Facebook
  • Restore a Lost or Discarded Firefox Session in Three Quick Steps
  • Change Skype’s 2.1.0.47 Default Sound Device in PulseAudio
  • Bash to Basics: The While Do Loop
  • Random xkcd comic
  • Rlogin the father of SSH
  • Integrate google calendar into your gnome calendar

Best of both worlds: twin

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I have mentioned a lot of console applications over the past few weeks, but usually either in conjunction with screen-vs, or with something running under X, like Musca. There is a middle ground, so to speak.

OpenGoo Review - DIY Web Office

Filed under
Software

eweekeurope.co.uk: Available in DIY or "with tech support" versions OpenGoo lacks some functionality, it has limited file formats, but, frees users from being tied to a web app provider.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: The Spicy Meatball Saves The Day, Uebergame, DwarfCorp

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.