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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

GCC 4.5 Is Still Not Ready For Release

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: GCC 4.4.0 was released nearly a year ago, but it looks like its one-year anniversary may pass without a new major release of the GNU Compiler Collection.

A Brief History of Brown: Ubuntu Feature Timeline

Filed under
Ubuntu

maketecheasier.com: Love it or hate it, Ubuntu has changed the way Linux is perceived by many. A lot has changed since Warty Warthog, the first release, so we here at MakeTechEasier thought it was time to take a look at how Ubuntu has evolved over time with screenshots.

Five Improvements for KDE 4.5 (Part 2)

Filed under
KDE

itnewstoday.com: Welcome to part 2! Last time I talked about all the cool features I wished for in KDE that have already became reality. This time I’m going to detail the things I hope to see in future KDE releases.

Build Your Own Video Community With Lighttpd And FlowPlayer (Ubuntu 9.10)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This article shows how you can build your own video community using lighttpd with its mod_flv_streaming module (for streaming .flv videos, the format used by most major video communities such as YouTube) and its mod_secdownload module (for preventing hotlinking of the videos) on Ubuntu 9.10. I will use FlowPlayer as the video player, a free Flash video player with support for lighttpd's mod_flv_streaming module. I will also show how you can encode videos (.mp4 .mov .mpg .3gp .mpeg .wmv .avi) to the FLV format supported by Adobe Flash.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Amarok 2.3.0 "Clear Light" Released
  • Unleash your inner sysadmin with AjaXplorer
  • Linux-based tool simplifies Cell processor programming
  • Gnome Gmail Tightly Integrates Gmail into Linux Desktops
  • Fluendo Launches the Ultimate Media Center for Linux
  • Celebrity death match: HTML5 Vs Flash
  • Supercomputers run open source software
  • the_source Episode 11 "Open Source Around The House" Released
  • Alpha version of Fedora on a usb stick
  • Does Quebec Hate Free Software?
  • EFF accuses Apple of going the full evil
  • XO Laptops Have Transformed Ntugi Mixed Day School
  • Linus Torvalds- The future of Linux
  • More ATI Radeon KMS Power Management Fun
  • Actor Peter Graves of 'Mission Impossible' dies at age 83
  • Linux in the developing world - Can the community help spread it?
  • Red Hat CEO Whitehurst to Keynote 2010 OSBC

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Disable the usage of history using HISTSIZE
  • Syntax Highlighting in Typepad
  • Expand The GNOME File Manager With Nautilus Actions
  • Execution Sequence of .bash_* files
  • Broadcom BCM4322 Wireless On Ubuntu Karmic
  • Fixing “connection refused” error in fetchmail on Ubuntu
  • How to Debug C Program using gdb in 5 Simple Steps
  • Install GIMP 2.7.1 on Lucid Lynx using PPA
  • Turbocharge OpenOffice.org Writer with AuthorSupportTool
  • Increase Firefox Address Bar Font Size
  • How To Enable Mouse Gestures In Linux With Easystroke
  • How to Install And Setup Ubuntu One In Kubuntu
  • enable NSRP dynamic route synchronisation

Dynamic Ubuntu Theme

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Dynamic Ubuntu Theme that changes depending on the time
  • Ubuntu forgets to add new system sounds for Lucid
  • Adventures with Ubuntu Karmic Koala

Got Security? You're in Denial

Filed under
Security
  • Got Security? You're in Denial
  • Collection of security checks for Linux
  • Worst. Security Product. EVER!
  • Multi-user Security in Linux

Running Alpha Lucid on the Dell T7500

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

redmonk.com/sogrady: Dell shipped me a loaner top of the line workstation to test, the Dell Precision T7500. I’ll have more on what, specifically, the machine is for later. For now, a quick rundown on the specs, setup and software choices.

openSUSE 11.3 Milestone 3 is out

Filed under
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: The third of seven scheduled milestone releases for 11.3 was completed and released on schedule. Milestone 3 focuses on using GCC 4.5 as the default compiler, leaving a great deal of the work in the hands of the openSUSE Build Service after a few issues (such as kernel panics) were resolved.

Why Metacity Window Buttons on Left in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

The default position of the window controls will remain the left, throughout beta1. We're interested in data which could influence the ultimate decision. There are good reasons both for the change, and against them, and ultimately the position will be decided based on what we want to achieve over time.

Rest here

An adventure with an HP printer/scanner and Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

tenshu.net: For a while now I’ve been thinking about some ideas for a project that will require a scanner. No problem you think, scanners of various kinds have been supported in Linux for a long time.

Banish boring terminal windows with Bashish

Filed under
Software

sourceforge.net/blog: Swedish student Thomas Eriksson says a lot of advanced computer usage is still best done from the terminal. Given that, he’s developed Bashish to provide a more useful and beautiful terminal environment.

Four Things Firefox Could Learn from IE

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux-mag.com: It’s popular to hate on IE8, and easy to do! But the truth is, Firefox could take a few cues from stodgy old Internet Explorer.

10 Great Linux Apps You Might Not Have Discovered Yet

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Have you just started to experiment with Linux? Are you looking for more than the basic applications? Here we'll quickly review 10 Linux apps you might want in addition to those preinstalled with Ubuntu or other Linux distribution (distro). Now lets get started!

Open source enables innovation without lawyers or fees

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

theaustralian.com.au: OPEN source software is seen by some as akin to religion. However, Ingres chief executive Roger Burkhardt insists he is not on a crusade to convert the Microsoft and Oracle faithful.

First Glance at SimplyMEPIS 8.5

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

osnews.com: Warren Woodford has his own vision and he's made it accessible to the world via MEPIS. This week he was willing to take a few minutes to talk about his creation.

QA with Matt Asay: How Linux is Beating Apple and Much More

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

linux.com: Matt took some time recently to share his perspective with me on why Canonical can take Linux places Red Hat can't, how Linux beats Apple, and how the Ubuntu community's passion and focus on design will change the way people see Linux for a long time.

Nokia's N900: Desktop Linux without the desk.

Filed under
Linux

In a previous post I wrote about how easy it was to use Nokia’s N900 out of the box. Today I’ll give you just a taste of what’s possible when you unlock the its full potential as handheld Linux computer.

More here.

PCLinuxOS 2010 Beta 1: A First Look

Filed under
PCLOS

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: NOT wishing to pass full judgement on a distro until it has reached its final release stage - it is not fair on the developers - I nevertheless thought it might be useful to offer some early, 'First Look' observations about PCLinuxOS 2010.

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More in Tux Machines

today's lefftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Running for the board of the Open Source Initiative – a few words
    Today I would like to explain my reasons for my candidacy at the board of the Open Source Initiative. I can think of two kinds of reason for my decision: one is personal, and the other one is directly related to current state of Open Source and software freedom. Let’s start with the first one: I’m currently helping the Open Information Security Foundation and the Suricata project in my capacity at ANSSI, while contributing in a minor way to the LibreOffice project and the Document Foundation.
  • Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People
    Since then, I have heard of another email provider that you may be interested in. It’s a little different, but it touts some of the same features ProtonMail does: privacy, security, open-source code, etc. It’s called Tutanota, and like ProtonMail, I am a very big fan.
  • Open FinTech Forum – Event preview, October 10-11, New York City.
  • The tracker will always get through
    A big objection to tracking protection is the idea that the tracker will always get through. Some people suggest that as browsers give users more ability to control how their personal information gets leaked across sites, things won't get better for users, because third-party tracking will just keep up. On this view, today's easy-to-block third-party cookies will be replaced by techniques such as passive fingerprinting where it's hard to tell if the browser is succeeding at protecting the user or not, and users will be stuck in the same place they are now, or worse. I doubt this is the case because we're playing a more complex game than just trackers vs. users. The game has at least five sides, and some of the fastest-moving players with the best understanding of the game are the adfraud hackers. Right now adfraud is losing in some areas where they had been winning, and the resulting shift in adfraud is likely to shift the risks and rewards of tracking techniques.
  • MozMEAO SRE Status Report - February 16, 2018
    Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from January 23 - February 16.
  • The major milestones of the Government Digital Service (GDS)
  • PyTorch Should Be Copyleft
    Most people have heard of Google’s Tensorflow which was released at the end of 2015, but there’s an active codebase called PyTorch which is easier to understand, less of a black box, and more dynamic. Tensorflow does have solutions for some of those limitations (such as Tensorflow-fold, and Tensorflow-Eager) but these new capabilities remove the need for other features and complexity of Tensorflow. Google built a great system for doing static computation graphs before realizing that most people want dynamic graphs. Doh! [...] I wish PyTorch used the AGPL license. Most neural networks are run on servers today, it is hardly used on the Linux desktop. Data is central to AI and that can stay owned by FB and the users of course. The ImageNet dataset created a revolution in computer vision, so let’s never forget that open data sets can be useful.
  • Linux on Nintendo Switch, a new Kubernetes ML platform, and more news
    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the Mozilla's IoT gateway, a new machine learning platform, Code.mil's revamp, and more.

Security: France, Munich, 'Smart' Meters, MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime

  • Highlights of the French cybersecurity strategy

    First, the document describes that in France cyberdefence and cyberoffence are separated. This is directly opposed to the models employed in Anglo-Saxon countries. But it’s shown as an asset. Key argument: it respects freedoms and civil liberties.

    The document then lists the six general objectives of cyberdefence, namely: prevention, anticipation, protection, detection, attribution, reaction (remediation). The strategy itself is complete, it focuses on civil, military, domestic, external, and international levels. Let’s say it’s a rarity in the business in strategic cybersecurity documents.

    [...]

    The strategy then mentions that one of the solutions could be to release source code and documentation after an end of support date.

  • The Munich Security Conference 2018

    Over the past five decades, the Munich Security Conference (MSC) has become the major global forum for the discussion of security policy. Each February, it brings together more than 450 senior decision-makers from around the world, including heads-of-state, ministers, leading personalities of international and non-governmental organizations, as well as high ranking representatives of industry, media, academia, and civil society, to engage in an intensive debate on current and future security challenges.

  • Smart meters could leave British homes vulnerable to cyber attacks, experts have warned
    New smart energy meters that the Government wants to be installed in millions of homes will leave householders vulnerable to cyber attacks, ministers have been warned.
  • MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime: Researchers nail exploits
    "The flaws—dubbed Meltdown and Spectre—are in chips made by Intel and other major suppliers. They can allow hackers to steal data from the memory of running apps, including password managers, browsers and emails." The authors of the paper on arXiv, Caroline Trippel, Daniel Lustig, and Margaret Martonosi, discuss a tool they developed for "automatically synthesizing microarchitecture-specific programs capable of producing any user-specified hardware execution pattern of interest." They said they show "how this tool can be used for generating small microarchitecture-specific programs which represent exploits in their most abstracted form—security litmus tests."

How Linux became my job

I've been using open source since what seems like prehistoric times. Back then, there was nothing called social media. There was no Firefox, no Google Chrome (not even a Google), no Amazon, barely an internet. In fact, the hot topic of the day was the new Linux 2.0 kernel. The big technical challenges in those days? Well, the ELF format was replacing the old a.out format in binary Linux distributions, and the upgrade could be tricky on some installs of Linux. Read more