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Thursday, 21 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 9:04pm
Story Several Sites Publish Their Thoughts On Steam Machines & The Steam Controller Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 7:51pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 7:27pm
Story Tizen Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 7:25pm
Story Android 6.0 Marshmallow review Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 7:16pm
Story GNOME's Mutter 3.18.1 Brings Better HiDPI On Wayland Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 6:05pm
Story Syncloud: personal services device Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 5:59pm
Story PHP 7.0 RC5 Released, PHP 7.0 In Under One Month Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 5:52pm
Story Is open source killing end-to-end products? Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 5:44pm
Story Processor utilization difference between IBM AIX and Linux on Power – apple to apple comparison Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2015 - 5:37pm

Damn Vulnerable Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxaria.com: I’ve used it in a virtual machine on VirtualBox and I’ve been very happy with the system, when it starts you have the opportunity to start KDE or Fluxbox, I chose Fluxbox. Once started, you will have the opportunity to start various “services” that will be used in exercises, such as a webserver and mysql.

Lucene Search Coming to openSUSE Wiki

Filed under
Web
SUSE

matthewehle.info: Most openSUSE users are aware that a new version of the English wiki was released back in July, with the other wikis soon to follow. Among many other changes, the new wiki came with a laundry list of new features. However, users have noticed that one important feature was still missing in the new wiki… a decent search engine.

Why the Linux Myths Continue

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: What will it take for Linux to lose the stigma that surrounds it in the eyes of IT administrators? If those particular myths could be undone, Linux adoption in businesses might benefit enormously. So what makes the myths continue?

Book review - Learn OpenOffice.org Spreadsheet Macros

Filed under
OOo

pcworld.com: My name is John Dukovich. I've been working with Microsoft Office applications, basically since they came out, and I'm a heavy user of Excel macros. I shied away from OpenOffice Calc for quite a while because initially I heard the macro feature wasn't as good as Excel's. However, when I got my hands on this book, OpenOffice.org Spreadsheet Macro Programming, I was curious and hoped to find I was wrong.

Project Canvas Will be *Linux* Based

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

opendotdotdot.blogspot: I've been pretty sceptical - and critical - of the BBC's TV over IP efforts, including Project Canvas:

Also: Tanner EDA Tools Now on Linux

Microdata: HTML5’s Best-Kept Secret

Filed under
Software

webmonkey.com: Given the amount of industry noise about native video and scripted animations, you’d be forgiven if you had never heard of the new microdata specification included in HTML5.

Comings and goings in the Linux gaming world

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: Today, I'm going to discuss the interesting phenomena, rise and fall of companies, games, technologies, and other cool stuff, all related to Linux gaming. So, this is not exactly a review, but we will definitely talk about the hot cakes in the gaming oven.

Chakra Linux - Distro Review

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: The Chakra project started off as a derivative of Arch Linux. It was a modular KDE Live CD with some extra tool sets to make setting up and using Arch Linux less of a hassle.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 1) - Graphics

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Various changes improve the performance and functionality of drivers for graphics chips in the latest Intel mobile processors. Nouveau now supports the Fermi chips used on recent GeForce graphics cards.

The HP Mini 110 Netbook: Almost One Year Later

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

ever-increasing-entropy.blogspot: Last October, after my third Sylvania netbook failed, I took the refund I had received and bought an HP Mini 110 netbook as a replacement.

OpenIndiana - Another OpenSolaris Fork - Coming Next Week

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: There is already the Illumos Project, which is a fork of OpenSolaris with a fully open-source code-base, that is now being used within the Nexenta and SchilliX operating systems, among others. We have just been tipped off as well that next week another new OpenSolaris derivative is being announced and it's to be called OpenIndiana.

5 Things I Miss From Linux When Using OSX

Filed under
Linux

everydaylht.com: I have been a Linux user for over 10 years… until now. Recently I purchased a MacBook Pro. In the course of using it, I’ve come across a number of features of Linux and the KDE desktop that I greatly miss.

Linux Mint “Debian” Screenshots

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Mint “Debian” Screenshots
  • Mint 10 Preview: Menu Search Engines
  • Distro Hoppin`: Linux Mint Debian Edition

3 Visually-Pleasing Linux Distributions That Use Enlightenment

Filed under
Linux
Software

makeuseof.com: Continuing the recent trend of highlighting lesser-known operating systems, this week we bring you three that should at least look good. As opposed to the usual GNOME or KDE window managers found on most Linux distributions, these have all chosen in favour of Enlightenment.

The first english Issue of PET (our Python Magazine) is out!

Filed under
Software

netmanagers.com.ar: Hell yeah! It has been a lot of work but it's out at http://revista.python.org.ar

Open Source Community Types

Filed under
OSS
  • Simon Says: Open Source Community Types
  • The Cost of Open Source Licensing Compliance
  • Meet the New Kingmakers: Same as the Old Kingmakers
  • Behind the open source turnaround at Broadcom
  • Open Source Licensing made easy for Italian Public Admins
  • Contribute to the OSS Watch National Survey 2010

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Can Debian achieve world domination without Facebook?
  • How the command line made my life a little easier
  • Magic Trackpad drivers land in Ubuntu
  • New Oracle Solaris Is Here
  • Are we done with LDFLAGS?
  • Kubuntu 10.10 Beta Screenshots Gallery
  • APLcomp Joins The Linux Foundation
  • Which Mandriva is in trouble?
  • Celestia: Travel Our Universe in 3-D
  • More Eyecandy On Its Way For Ubuntu 10.10 Installer Slideshow
  • Recipe for Open Standards
  • Ubuntu Insurance?
  • Paradigm Shift
  • Mark Bohannon joins Red Hat as vice president
  • Opensourcers get personal over Ellison's Google fight
  • FLOSS Weekly 134: SugarLabs
  • NetApp and Oracle lift ZFS patent cloud
  • the art of blurring the shadow
  • Adopting Open-Source Applications

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create directory trees in one command
  • Learn To Use The Ubuntu Command Line With CLIcompanion
  • commands for OpenOffice applications
  • REE, Passenger and Rails on Ubuntu
  • Rescuing Difficult Panoramas on Linux, Hugin part 2
  • Access Google Docs in Ubuntu desktop via Nautilus File browser
  • Limit Download Speed For Apt Command Using Terminal
  • What is user slaying?
  • vifm: Fast, lightweight, old school file manager
  • Backup Linux? 15 rsync Command Examples
  • Creating Custom Man Pages
  • [SOLVED] NO_PUBKEY 61E091672E206FF0
  • Using Exim4 to send Messages through GMail
  • Debugging shared library problems: a real-world example
  • How-To: Quotes to Live By
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 145: Pictures at an Exhibition

Review: Amnesia - The Dark Descent

Filed under
Gaming

keysakimbo.blogspot: No no no no no, stay away, don't look! Light, light, I need light, where's the light? No, darkness! Hide! Oh god he's going to see me nooooooo... oh, thank god he's gone. Now, what's in this room?" *Sound of door creaking slowly open* Oh... oh god, no.

Linux backlight control

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

mjg59.livejournal.com: Backlight control is one of those things that you'd think would be simple, but ha ha this is computing so of course it's an utter disaster and everything is a huge mess.

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More in Tux Machines

Funding for Open 'Core' Companies

'Proper' GNU/Linux on Google OSes

  • Google’s Fuchsia OS will support Linux apps
    Google’s non-Linux-based Fuchsia OS has added an emulator for running Debian Linux apps. Like its upcoming Linux emulator for Chrome OS, Fuchsia’s “Guest” app will offer tighter integration than typical emulators. Google has added a Guest app to its emergent and currently open source Fuchsia OS to enable Linux apps to run within Fuchsia as a virtual machine (VM). The Guest app makes use of a library called Machina that permits closer integration with the OS than is available with typical emulators, according to a recent 9to5Google story.
  • Here are the latest Chrome OS devices that will support Linux apps
    The ability to run Linux apps in virtual machines in Chrome is expanding beyond Google's flagship Pixelbook line of Chromebooks. The feature, for which plans were first discovered in late February, was formally announced by Google at I/O 2018. Unlike the existing solution, Crouton, support for Linux apps does not require enabling developer mode on Chrome OS, allowing users to install Linux apps without needing to sacrifice security protections. In addition to the Pixelbook, support for the new Crostini virtual machine feature has also come to the original Samsung Chromebook Plus, the detachable HP Chromebook X2, and the ASUS Chromebook Flip C101. Likewise, according to a report from xda-developers, the feature is coming to the Acer Chromebook Spin 13 and Chromebook 13, as well as 2018-era Chromeboxes, which all share the same board ID "fizz." Of these, the Acer Chromebox CX13 series and ASUS Chromebox 3 series both have multiple SKUs, maxing out with an Intel Core i7-8550U paired with 16GB RAM and 64GB storage for $750.
  • Linux App Support Is Coming To Acer Chromebook Flip C101
    Acer’s Chromebook Flip C101 is now officially the latest Chrome OS device expected to be in-line for virtualized Linux app support, following a new commit pushed to the Chromium Gerrit on June 15. That places the Flip C101 in a very select club alongside Google’s Pixelbook, the HP Chromebook x2, and the first generation Samsung Chromebook Plus. Of course, there’s no official date with regard to when Linux App support will arrive for the Chromebook Flip C101. If previous trends are followed, then it shouldn’t take too long at all for its official arrival in the Canary Channel of the OS. That comes following a commit indicating that support for the new feature has been moved from the Samsung Chromebook Plus to the devices’ shared parent board. Since only the Chromebook Plus and Chromebook Flip C101 share that board, dubbed “Gru,” that suggests that both devices will support Linux apps in a virtual environment.

Linux Foundation: New Study, Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), and Hyperledger Fabric

Graphics: AMDGPU, Nvidia, Apple's Harm to Science

  • AMDGPU DRM Driver To Finally Expose GPU Load Via Sysfs
    The AMDGPU DRM driver appears to finally be crossing the milestone of exposing the current GPU load (as a percentage) in a manner that can be easily queried via sysfs. For years I've been frustrated via the lack of standardization of sysfs/debugfs files among the DRM drivers and some seemingly basic information not being exposed in such a manner that easily benefits various desktop plug-ins, those wanting to script basic monitors/checks/etc around such outputs, and use-cases like with the Phoronix Test Suite for easily querying this information too for its sensor recording. One of the frustrations with the Radeon Linux stack has been that there wasn't a trivial way to read the GPU load usage as a percentage... There's been ways if installing third-party utilities like RadeonTool, but no universal solution nor one that doesn't require root and would be widely available.
  • Radeon Software 18.20 Stable Released With Official Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Support
    The Radeon Software "AMDGPU-PRO" 18.20 hybrid driver stack is now available with official support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 17.20. Two months after the debut of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" release, the Q2'2018 Radeon Sotware for Linux driver update has arrived with support for this latest long-term support release. Radeon Software 18.20 was officially released last week but seemingly went under everyone's radar until now.
  • Nvidia Releases a Batch of Open Source Tools for AI
    Graphics processors increasingly used as hardware accelerators for deep learning applications are also being deployed with the Kubernetes cluster orchestrator as another way to accelerate the scaling of training and inference for deep learning models. The two-front approach includes Nvidia’s (NASDAQ: NVDA) release to developers this week of a Kubernetes on GPU capability aimed at enterprises training models on multi-cloud GPU clusters. Previously, Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) launched a beta version of GPUs on its Kubernetes Engine aimed at accelerating machine learning and image processing workloads.
  • AI caramba! Nvidia devs get a host of new kit to build smart systems
    Nvidia has released a bunch of new tools for savvy AI developers in time for the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference in Salt Lake City on Tuesday.
  • Chemists criticise mooted shutdown of 3D visualisation tools
    End of support for Apple’s OpenGL programming interface could pull the plug on molecular modelling software Researchers are voicing concerns over a move that may affect many 3D visualisation programs that are commonly used in computational research. Apple’s Macintosh operating systems (macOS) is set to end support for OpenGL, the programming interface frequently used to display 3D graphics in medical and scientific visualisation software, which has existed since 1992. Nearly all open source and commercial chemistry visualisation programs that are used to display atoms, molecules, bonds and protein ribbons – such as Mercury, VMD and PyMOL – use the system.