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Tuesday, 16 Sep 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story First Android netbooks surface srlinuxx 1 22/04/2009 - 9:44am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 22/04/2009 - 3:29am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 22/04/2009 - 3:03am
Story Ex-Red-Hat brains decide to ride cloud srlinuxx 22/04/2009 - 12:53am
Story Firefox 3.0.9 security release now available srlinuxx 22/04/2009 - 12:48am
Story Red Hat and Fedora are Poles Apart srlinuxx 21/04/2009 - 10:10pm
Story “We’re Linux” Videos: Placing Freedom Before Practicality? srlinuxx 21/04/2009 - 10:04pm
Story Why I Use Linux srlinuxx 21/04/2009 - 8:15pm
Story Open source VS proprietary support srlinuxx 21/04/2009 - 8:09pm
Story The offensive Microsoft anti-Linux netbook offensive srlinuxx 21/04/2009 - 8:06pm

Opera Software wins Chinese nod

Filed under
Software

Oslo-based Opera Software said Tuesday that its browser has been selected for advanced Linux-based smartphones being developed by China's ZTE Corp. The market potential is huge.

Ruling won't slow file swapping, experts say

Filed under
Legal

The Supreme Court may have dealt file-swapping companies a blow on Monday, but its decision is unlikely to put a damper on the illegal sharing of music and other media online anytime soon, industry experts say.

Bloggers fighting government regulations

Filed under
Web

Bloggers who built their Internet followings with anti-establishment prose are now lobbying the establishment to protect their livelihoods from federal regulations.

AMD Hauls Intel Back to Court

Filed under
Legal

Its latest suit alleges that the giant engages in anticompetitive practices aimed at crippling the smaller chipmaker.

Oversimplified gameplay haunts 'Batman Begins'

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

The recent trend of movie-based video games resumes as the Dark Knight returns to consoles everywhere in Batman Begins. Unfortunately, the stealth-based adventure is hampered by overly basic gameplay.

Analysis: What the ruling against Grokster really means

Filed under
Legal

As this morning's 55-page US Supreme Court decision in MGM v. Grokster has now had time to be fully disseminated and analyzed, consensus is taking shape that even peer-to-peer services not named in the lawsuit may find themselves in legal hot water very soon.

China's Internet Users Top 100 Million

Filed under
Web

China's population of Internet users has surpassed 100 million, the government said Tuesday, coming in second behind the United States, which has 135 million.

Lawsuit seeks disclosure in credit card heist

Filed under
Legal

A lawsuit was filed Monday intended to help consumers and merchants left in the dark after a digital break-in that put millions of credit card accounts at risk of fraud.

Space station gets HAL-like computer

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A voice-operated computer assistant is set to be used in space for the first time on Monday – its operators hope it proves more reliable than "HAL", the treacherous speaking computer in the movie 2001.

UK Phishers Caught, Packed Away

Filed under
Security

Authorities in the UK have sentenced two men to prison for their role in a phishing scam, according to a statement from the UK's National Hi-Tech Crime Unit.

Quake Mobile next month

Filed under
Gaming

Quake, the famous 3D Shooter from id Software that was originally released in 1996 for the PC, is being ported for 3D-enabled mobile phones this July.

Oh noooooo! Tigger AND Piglet pass away

Filed under
Obits

'Twas a sad weekend in Hundred Acre Wood.

Paul Winchell, the early TV pioneer best remembered for creating a string of cartoon voices, most famously Winnie the Pooh's pal Tigger, died Friday. A day later, John Fiedler, the veteran stage and screen actor who voiced Piglet, passed away.

Somewhere Eeyore is even more glum than usual.

Interview: Ryan Quinn, Symphony OS

Filed under
Linux

In place of their "Distro of the Week", DistroWatch has published an interview with Ryan Quinn, project manager of the revolutionary SymphonyOS.

Bluefish... It's A Keeper

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Bluefish is a handy, text-based HTML editor for anybody that needs to crank out a lot of Web content, without a lot of fluff. It is a mature application that does its job quickly and efficiently.

PS3 To Have More Power

Filed under
Gaming

Reports have surfaced saying that the version of Sony's new console shown at the E3 was using only 75 percent of the machines final capabilities.

File-Sharing Services May Be Sued

Filed under
Legal

Internet file-sharing services will be held responsible if they intend for their customers to use software primarily to swap songs and movies illegally, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.

CLI Magic: locate, slocate, and rlocate

Filed under
Linux

Sometimes you need to find a file right now, and you don't want to search for it one directory after another. That's the time to visit the CLI and locate the missing file. Or slocate it, depending on your distribution. There is just one problem with using locate or slocate, and that's staying up to date. Here's how they work and how to use them.

Lawmakers Aim to Protect Public Broadband

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Fourteen U.S. states have passed laws limiting municipal broadband services, with large Internet providers lobbying against city-offered services. Two U.S. senators have jumped into a growing debate about whether cities should be allowed to create tax-funded broadband services, with the two introducing a bill that would prevent states from outlawing municipal broadband projects.

Reinventing the Internet

Filed under
Web

Originally developed by the Defense Department, the Internet is now a global electronic-communications network made up of hundreds of millions of computers. Because no one entity owns it, the network depends on goodwill to function smoothly. The Internet has become so huge — and so misused — that some worry that its power to improve society has been undermined. Now a movement to upgrade the network — to create an Internet 2.0 — is gathering steam.

Security holes haunt RealPlayer

Filed under
Security

Real Networks has fixed four serious security vulnerabilities in its Real, Rhapsody and Helix media players. The flaw affects most RealPlayer software for Windows as well as Rhapsody, which is used for Real's subscription music service. A similar attack method can be used to exploit another flaw in RealPlayer for OS X, Windows and Linux as well as the Helix Player for Linux.

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