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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Wireless-enabled i.MX6 SBC offers remote IoT management Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2015 - 1:10am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 11:10pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 9:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 9:47pm
Story Evolve OS Is a Superb New OS Built from Scratch, First Beta Is Out – Gallery Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 9:33pm
Story Nouveau In Linux 3.20 Will Have A Lot Of Code Cleaning Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 9:23pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 9:15pm
Story Debian 8.0 "Jessie" Installer RC1 Released Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 9:08pm
Story Firefox 35.0.1 Now Out – My God, It's Full of Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 9:06pm
Story Compiz Support Being Tested for Ubuntu MATE 14.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.10, Install Now Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 9:02pm

An open source flower wilts and dies

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: I knew of a little flower called Open Source. It started out as a seed and was given water, fertiliser and sunlight. This flower started growing and sending out roots, becoming stronger with every leaf. One day the fertiliser was changed.

Choosing the Right Linux Netbook + Why You Should Avoid Windows 7

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Instead of bashing Microsoft for deliberately spreading several great lies about Linux, I'm going to write something useful that I hope will benefit those who are planning to buy a netbook.

openSUSE Goes Offline To Transform

Filed under
SUSE

linuxjournal.com: Having your Linux distribution suddenly disappear from the internet would put a strain on anyone. It does happen from time to time, however, something the team at Fedora can testify to. Announcing in advance that your distro will pull a David Copperfield would prove far less stressful, and that's exactly what the good people at openSUSE have done.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Group test: newsreaders
  • Kubuntu apps repraise
  • Four GNOME Blogging Clients Worth Noting
  • Are you a 100% free user?
  • Netbooks? Oh Yes, They Are Enterprise Grade
  • Software Freedom Day Italy (Perugia)
  • Will KVM KO Xen?
  • Video: Audio Production With Free Software
  • Microsoft makes points to ponder
  • Case Study: Financial firm switches from Unix, Windows to Linux
  • NYSE/Euronext powers ahead with Unix-to-Linux migration
  • DreamWorks uses Red Hat cloud to cut filmmaking costs
  • The Status Of Unigine's Linux-Compatible Game
  • AMD Eyefinity 24 Display Tech Demo On Linux
  • MySQL Connector for OpenOffice.org 1.0 GA
  • Linux on POWER: Distribution migration and binary compatibility considerations
  • White House Director of New Media speaks about Open Source
  • Novell: Novell Open Source Luminaries to Speak at LinuxCon
  • Not always Gentoo's fault
  • OpenMW interview with Nicolay Korslund
  • GoblinX 3.0 GNOME Edition Has Support for Netbooks
  • Fun and FUD in the Fall Flamebait Follies

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Count packages installed by pacman
  • Adding a user on Zenwalk 6.2
  • Working with Bluetooth: Connecting to All Those Cool Devices
  • Changing the from field when sending email
  • OOo: How to tell what data your chart is based on, and update it
  • Add a second drive to your Ubuntu server
  • How to install Java Runtime on Zenwalk 6.2
  • How can I assign a user process to a specific pseudo tty?
  • How to update your custom Ubuntu Jaunty kernel
  • Protect Your Network With an Open-Source Firewall

Linux distribution

Get Decked: A Look at TweetDeck

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: Having trouble keeping up with your social media? The TweetDeck crew released a major update to the “social dashboard” this week that adds support for Facebook and MySpace. Now you can update several major services and bring order to your social media universe.

LifeHacker and Ubuntu: A Response

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonobacon.org: Recently LifeHacker had an article talking about five things they would like to see in Ubuntu. The article is very supportive of Ubuntu, and we appreciate that LifeHacker folks, and I wanted to follow up with a few notes.

Nano notebook design sports Mobile WiMAX

Filed under
Hardware

linuxfordevices.com: Via announced a Linux-compatible notebook reference design that packs a 1.3GHz Nano processor along with optional Mobile WiMAX, GPS, and cellular connectivity.

Karmic makes you go WOW

Filed under
Ubuntu

davmor2.blogspot: I thought I would just say WOW! There are little touches in Karmic that just make me think why wasn't this in before.

KDE 4 Fanboys: seriously, knock it off

Filed under
KDE

linuxcritic.wordpress: When I say “I’m looking for a way to make KDE 3.5.10 work on Slackware 13″ or “I’m looking for applications to replace the ones I’ve gotten used to using in KDE, since I won’t be installing KDE going forward”, what does that mean to you?

Hey, check out my package!

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: There are many, many Linux distributions floating around the internet tubes waiting to be downloaded for your computing pleasure. One thing they all have in common is some form of package management system.

moonOS 3.0 Review, Screenshots, Video

Filed under
Linux

beginlinux.wordpress: moonOS is another fantastic looking distro that has always put a lot of stock in appearance. Based on Ubuntu 9.04 Januty Jackalope and codenamed “Makara”, the moonOS 3.0 release is no exception with plenty of improvements.

Eight Things Windows Needs Before I'll Use it Again

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxphilia.blogspot: Windows 7 is better than Vista. Great. But saying that is like saying you'd rather catch the common cold instead of swine flu. I've demoed the release candidate for Windows 7, and I can safely say that I still don't like it. There are several things I need to see in a Windows operating system before I'll even contemplate switching back.

Guide to porting from Solaris to Linux on POWER

Filed under
Linux

Six steps to accelerate Solaris to Linux on POWER porting tasks

My Arch Linux Experiment (Part 2)

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: Welcome to part two of my Arch Linux experiment, where I am attempting to determine if Arch is a viable replacement for Kubuntu on my machine. Previously, I bombed out big time and here the saga continues.

DesktopBSD 1.7

Filed under
BSD

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Although the official name of this blog is Desktop Linux Reviews, we will occasionally be looking at non-Linux operating systems too. Such is the case with DesktopBSD 1.7 which is a version of the FreeBSD operating system.

Now, Microsoft Indoctrinates Best Buy against Macs

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac

maximumpc.com: A couple of days after an anonymous forum poster exposed Microsoft’s surreptitious anti-Linux training material for Best Buy employees, it has now become apparent that Redmond is providing them with anti-Mac training material as well.

Also:

  • Is Microsoft stalling on its GPL Linux drivers?
  • Microsoft software licensing: A nightmare
  • Cowboys Stadium: Windows did not shut down succesfully
  • Sara Ford – the Microsoft open source leader who gives and gives
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More in Tux Machines

Licensing: Facebook Responds to Licence Complaints, Cloud Native Open Source License Choices Analysed

  • Facebook relicenses several projects
    Facebook has announced that the React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js projects will be moving to the MIT license. This is, of course, a somewhat delayed reaction to the controversy over the "BSD+patent" license previously applied to those projects.
  • Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js
    Next week, we are going to relicense our open source projects React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license. We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons. This decision comes after several weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Although we still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to users of our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community.
  • Cloud Native Open Source License Choices
    One of the most common questions regarding open source licensing today concerns trajectories. Specifically, what are the current directions of travel both for specific licenses as well as license types more broadly. Or put more simply, what licenses are projects using today, and how is that changing? We’ve examined this data several times, most recently in this January look at the state of licensing based on Black Duck’s dataset. That data suggested major growth for permissive licenses, primarily at the expense of reciprocal alternatives. The Apache and MIT licenses, for example, were up 10% and 21% respectively, while the GPL was down 27%. All of this is on a relative share basis, of course: the “drop” doesn’t reflect relicensing of existing projects, but less usage relative to its peers. [...] One such community with enough of a sample size to be relevant is the one currently forming around the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Founded in 2015 with the Kubernetes project as its first asset, the Foundation has added eleven more open source projects, all of which are licensed under the same Apache 2 license. But as a successful Foundation is only a part of the broader ecosystem, the real question is what are the licensing preferences of the Cloud Native projects and products outside of the CNCF itself. [...] Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given the influence of the CNCF itself, Apache strongly outperforms all other licenses, showing far greater relative adoption than it has in more generalized datasets such as the Black Duck survey. Overall in this dataset, approximately 64% of projects are covered by the Apache license. No other project has greater than a 12% share. The only other licenses above 10%, in fact, are the GPL at 12% and MIT at 11%. After that, the other projects are all 5% or less.

today's howtos

Games: Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D., Arcan 0.5.3, Wine Staging 2.17

  • Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. from former Valve worker should hopefully come to Linux
    Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. [Steam] is a mod from former Valve worker Cayle George, it's a short prison escape and it should be coming to Linux. Mr George actually worked on Team Fortress 2 and Portal 2 during his time at Valve, but he's also worked for other notable developers on titles like Horizon Zero Dawn.
  • Game Engine Powered Arcan Display Server With Durden Desktop Updated
    Arcan, the open-source display server powered by a game engine, is out with a new release. Its Durden desktop environment has also been updated. Arcan is a display server built off "the corpse of a game engine" and also integrates a multimedia framework and offers behavior controls via Lua. Arcan has been in development for a half-decade while its original code traces back more than a decade, as explained previously and has continued advancing since.
  • Arcan 0.5.3, Durden 0.3
    It’s just about time for a new release of Arcan, and way past due for a new release of the reference desktop environment, Durden. Going through some of the visible changes on a ‘one-clip or screenshot per feature’ basis:
  • Razer plans to release a mobile gaming and entertainment device soon
    NVIDIA, another big player in the gaming hardware and lifestyle space, released an Android-based portable gaming and entertainment console called the NVIDIA Shield that emphasized in-home streaming, and the Ouya console that Razer acquired (and discontinued) ran Android. But Razer decided to use Windows instead of Android on the Edge.
  • Wine Staging 2.17 is out with more Direct3D11 features fixing issues in The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more
    Wine Staging 2.17 is another exciting release, which includes more Direct3D11 features which fixes issues with The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more. As a reminder, Wine Staging is the testing area for future Wine development released, which will eventually be made into stable Wine releases.

KDE: Plasma 5.11 in Kubuntu 17.10, Krita 3.3, Randa and Evolution of Plasma Mobile

  • KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Will Be Coming to Kubuntu 17.10 Soon After Its Release
    KDE kicked off the development of the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment a few months ago, and they've already published the Beta release, allowing users to get a first glimpse of what's coming in the final release next month. Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop team did a great job bringing the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment to the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and it looks like the Kubuntu team also want to rebase the official flavor on the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment.
  • Krita 3.3 Digital Painting App Promises Better HiDPI Support on Linux & Windows
    Work on the next Krita 3.x point release has started, and a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Krita 3.3 version is now ready for public testing, giving us a glimpse of what's coming in the new release. In the release announcement, Krita devs reveal the fact that they were forced to bump the version number from 3.2.x to 3.3.x because the upcoming Krita 3.3 release will be introducing some important changes for Windows platforms, such as support for the Windows 8 event API, thus supporting the n-trig pen in Surface laptops.
  • Randa-progress post-hoc
    So, back in Randa I was splitting my energies and attentions in many pieces. Some attention went to making pancakes and running the kitchen in the morning — which is stuff I take credit for, but it is really Grace, and Scarlett, and Thomas who did the heavy lifting, and Christian and Mario who make sure the whole thing can happen. And the attendees of the Randa meeting who pitch in for the dishes after lunch and dinner. The Randa meetings are more like a campground than a 5-star hotel, and we work together to make the experience enjoyable. So thanks to everyone who pitched in. Part of a good sprint is keeping the attendees healthy and attentive — otherwise those 16-hour hacking days really get to you, in spite of the fresh Swiss air. [...] You can read more of what the attendees in Randa achieved on planet KDE (e.g. kdenlive, snappy, kmymoney, marble, kube, Plasma mobile, kdepim, and kwin). I’d like to give a special shout out to Manuel, who taught me one gesture in Italian Sign Langauage — which is different from American or Dutch Sign Language, reminding me that there’s localization everywhere.
  • The Evolution of Plasma Mobile
    Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?