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About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story X.Org Server 1.16 Planned For A July Debut Rianne Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 9:57pm
Story First Samsung Tizen phone hits the FCC? Rianne Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 7:14pm
Story The Big Iron Crunch Rianne Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 6:54pm
Story ASUS Zenbook Prime Linux Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 6:37pm
Story GNOME Software 3.11.3 Adds More Featured Apps Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 4:13pm
Story Introducing Ubuntu Unity for Arch Linux Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 4:09pm
Story Linux Mint 16 Xfce Desktop Review Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 4:04pm
Story New Geeksphone to run Android and Firefox OS on x86 Rianne Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 3:06pm
Story GNU Octave 3.8 Has A GUI, Uses OpenGL Rianne Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 2:53pm
Story Linux: Then and Now Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2013 - 1:56pm

Linux conference calls for papers

Filed under
Linux The fact that organising Australia's national Linux conference is fully a year's work has been brought home with the announcement by the organisers of LCA 2009, or as it is better known, that ideas for papers can be submitted.

AltSearch for OOo Writer functionality trumps first impressions

Filed under
OOo Alternative Find and Replace for Writer (AltSearch) has the ambitious goal of replacing and enhancing one of the most basic pieces of functionality. It's undermined by a chaotic interface, but if you have the patience to continue past first impressions, you will find AltSearch comes far closer to fulfilling its promise than you might initially imagine

Linux for housewives. XP for geeks.

Filed under

blogs.zdnet: Retailers and contract manufacturers in Taiwan say that novice PC users there, like students and housewives, tend to buy the Linux version of the Eee PC701, while geeks go for Windows XP. Does that sound backwards?

Why Aren’t All Linux Live CDs Customizable?

Filed under
Linux I don’t use Linux as my operating system, but I do have several Linux live CDs. The problem that I always have with live CDs for Linux is that when they’re built, they include things I would never include. Or, they don’t put in things that I feel I should have. At Custom NimbleX, you can easily create your own customized version of Linux.

Move Your Business from Windows to Linux

Filed under
Linux Making the switch from Windows to Linux will incur some costs as employees and support staff adjust to the new system's configuration settings, utilities, and applications. Even so, the savings in future hardware and software upgrades could be huge.

A Journey to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu My first Linux installation took place circa 1992, I pulled my hair out for a month or so while I was trying to figure out how to install this very interesting and FREE operating system. Wow, Linux has gone a long way since my first install.

The Swiss Army Distro - Might Someone Finally Be Getting It?

Filed under
Linux One of the things that's bothered me to no end for quite a while is the ridiculously huge number of Linux distributions out there. 350+ active or semi-active and nearly 200 dead distros is rather pathetic in my opinion. It would not be hard at all to merge all of those distributions into one "jack of all trades" distribution.

Fedora 9: Was it worth the wait?

Filed under
Linux As many of you know, a while back I was converted to Ubuntu. Currently running (happily I might add) Ubuntu 7.10, I have had no need to return to my Red Hat roots. Of course being a writer in this industry, it behoves me to make sure I am up to date on the latest, greatest software. So I decided it was necessary that I install Fedora 9.

few more howtos:

Filed under
  • Rename Files in Bulk from the Command Line

  • Nautilus search
  • Adding a service in Fedora

Gentoo Linux 2008.0

Filed under
Gentoo In recent times the Gentoo Linux and its foundation has been plagued with a multitude of problems and times have certainly been challenging for this once popular distribution. It's already July and we are now finally seeing Gentoo's first official release of the year.

KDE 3 vs KDE 4: It’s Finally Over

Filed under

jonreagan.wordpress: Recently there has been quite a karfuffle surrounding several people’s disagreement over the direction of KDE 4. As many of you know, KDE 4 is not yet complete, and is far different from it’s ancestor, KDE 3. The arguments have seemingly quieted down, and finally there has been some closure on the debate.

Buddi - Simple Personal Budgeting

Filed under
Software Many financial applications, such as KMyMoney, can be very useful, however there is often quite a learning curve associated with them. Buddi is an open source personal budgeting application for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X that is designed to keep things very simple.

The Linux Saga: Preface

Filed under
Linux This story begins – as usual – long long time ago, far far away, behind the Ocean, in United States of America, in Bell Laboratories building. In that firm a computer stood. Nothing special about it, but in 1969, when those events started, computer wasn’t commonplace at all. There were no Personal Computers, no Microsoft, IBM or Apple.

Mark Shuttleworth on Ubuntu and the Linux Desktop

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Ubuntu He is, without a doubt, the only open source software leader who might be called “dashing.” Young (34), fabulously rich (north of $500 million as of 1999) Mark Shuttleworth buzzes around on his own private jet, the Canonical One. He is also, without a doubt, the open source leader who is most actively shaping the future of the Linux desktop.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #98

Filed under
Ubuntu The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 98 for the weeks June 29nd - July 5th, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Ubuntu 8.04.1 released, Intrepid Alpha 2 due out Thursday, Kubuntu Intrepid news, and much more.

Securing your Ubuntu box, don’t worry it’s easy!

Filed under

izanbardprince.wordpress: Linux is generally regarded as secure: But as preachy as Ubuntu gets about not using a root terminal, you’d think that they must ship this really secure operating system, right? Well….yes and no.

odds & ends

  • Install the 1.15.2 “no CD” Patch for StarCraft on Ubuntu 8.04

  • Install StarCraft and the BroodWar expansion on Ubuntu 8.04 in Wine
  • Nouveau NV50 KMS Work Continues
  • Top Ten Linux Distributions 2008
  • 13 Command Line Tools for Audio on Linux

Please Vote in My Favorite Desktop Poll

If you haven't voted in Tuxmachines' Favorite Desktop Poll, would you please consider doing so now? I want to use that data in an article and I need as large of a sample as possible. As you know, the larger the sample the more valid the survey. Thanks!

>> Vote HERE <<

Developing for Linux netbooks Most all readers will be well aware of the ASUS Eee Linux PC. Other vendors now seek to achieve similar success, the latest being Acer’s Linpus device. Yet, a common complaint is that traditional software doesn’t necessarily translate well to the smaller screens. Here’s my tips for developing software for the emerging and widely popular netbook market.

Kubuntu 8.04 - two months later

Filed under

razvanp.wordpress: Two months later after my first blog about Ubuntu, I am still using it. In two months I found lot of issues, some I managed to solve, some I can live with.

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.