Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story SolydXK Added to Distrowatch Database srlinuxx 30/04/2013 - 4:08am
Story Fuduntu Done Now, All Hail FuSE srlinuxx 2 30/04/2013 - 12:05am
Story Compiling your own custom kernel for fun and profit srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 10:46pm
Story An Adaptive Prompt for Bash or Zsh srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 10:45pm
Story Opera claims former employee gave stolen trade secrets to Mozilla srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 10:43pm
Story Ubuntu Drivers srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 8:51pm
Story Livarp – A lightweight Linux Distribution srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 7:28pm
Story FOSS Fact or Fiction? A Tale of Two Surveys srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 6:38pm
Story Debian Project News - April 29th srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 4:52pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 505 srlinuxx 29/04/2013 - 9:24am

some leftovers

Filed under
News
  • The making of Wine (how to make Windows apps merrier with Linux)

  • Taking a closer look at the Opera browser
  • My not-so-positive ramblings on the Asus EEEPC
  • Open-source anti-virus scanner hit by exploit
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 6th April 2008
  • Upgrading to 8.04
  • Gentoo Safe Flags
  • Kernel space: memory allocation failures
  • 4 months and 10 days without any new Debian developer. Is Debian dying?

Where Novell Can Beat Microsoft

Filed under
SUSE

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy admits it: He left Novell for dead last year. But recent conversations with the company forced him to rethink all of those negative notions. In a few markets, Novell may actually thrive. And in one particular market, Novell could give Microsoft a run for its money.

Also: Novell slashes mainframe Linux pricing

Just 10 Years of Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

openlogic.com/blogs: Abhijit Nadgouda says it's been a decade since the term open source was chosen to represent the concept. This is true, but the concept has been around far longer. Sure, it has forever changed the way software is created and consumed, but why now all of a sudden?

Also: What Hurts Them Helps Us: How Open Source Benefits from the Bad

6 Must-Have Firefox Extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

ostatic.com/blog: In a photo tour I posted a few days ago, I provided some handy Firefox tips that can save you time if you spend a lot of time in almost everyone's favorite open source browser. To get the most out of Firefox, though, I recommend using the best extensions. In this post, I'll round up six of my favorites.

Also: Mozilla Developer News April 15

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Perl Script To Graph Iostat Output on Unix

  • Mandriva repo guide for newbie
  • Real Player 11
  • How-To: Import/Export GPG key pair
  • Bringing chat to the browser with JWChat

Budget Fair Queuing IO Scheduler

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "We are working [on] a new I/O scheduler based on CFQ, aiming at improved predictability and fairness of the service, while maintaining the high throughput it already provides," began Fabio Checconi, announcing the BFQ I/O scheduler.

My kid hates Linux too! (so what?)

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: My kid hates Linux too. He’s 16, loves games, and finally stopped whining for a GameCube when he learned his Windows DVDs could also be played online. But for a kid to say he “hates” Linux is simply mistaken, on the kid’s part. If he uses Google, or thousands of other sites, he loves Linux.

Also: First my kid hates Linux, now I have to buy laptops with Vista

ISO Ill at Ease Over OOXML

computerworlduk.com: The nominal approval of OOXML last month unleashed an unprecedented outpouring of anger, with much of that ire directed at the ISO for failing to uphold basic standards during the process. This has prompted it to respond with a rather interesting FAQ in which it desperately tries to defend itself.

Also: Microsoft's OOXML trophy is conditional

Putting Windows On A Diet ... To Compete With Linux

Filed under
OS

informationweek.com/blog: How scared is Microsoft of Linux? There's a hint or two of its fear in the fact that MS is preparing a special slim-and-trim version of Windows XP, within the next month or two, to run specifically on Asus's Eee PC.

Also: Microsoft looks to avoid losses to Linux in embedded OS market

Linux, Unix more reliable than Windows

Filed under
OS

theinquirer.net: The Yankee Group has been busy again this year, but its latest report seems to offer a very different story to last year’s, with Windows now performing significantly worse than its Linux and Unix rivals.

Also: Windows (in)security and open source

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • More Productive Window Management in GIMP

  • LS_COLORS Explained
  • Use Wireshark to capture and analyse packets
  • yum, can it be faster?
  • Install Nodoka (Fedora theme) on Ubuntu
  • Remove a path from your PATH variable
  • Network Configuration—Tunneling with Free BSD
  • Colored ls Output
  • Customizing Your Bash Prompt

Prosecutor Tells Jurors 'Nina is Dead' and Hans Reiser 'Killed Her'

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: "Nina is dead and the defendant killed her," prosecutor Paul Hora told jurors at the outset of his closing arguments here. Hora conceded to jurors that the case is based largely on circumstantial evidence. But he said the defendant should not be "rewarded" for successfully disposing of her body.

some shorts

  • Ryan Orser Podcast Season 1 Episode 3

  • Fallout From NVIDIA 173.08 Driver
  • Open Source Projects double every 14 months!
  • Kiowa goes KDE!
  • Mandriva 2008 Spring Quick Install
  • Visions of freedom: RMS as seen by TdR

Falling in Love with the XO All Over Again

Filed under
OLPC

blog.olenepal.org: I got involved with OLPC back in June of 2006. It’s hard to believe that was almost two years ago! Over the last two years this enthusiasm waxed and waned. It was only in January of this year that I really got to use the little device. At OLPC offices I disassembled and reassembled two XO’s. What fun!

Spotlight on FOSS: An Interview with Mark Shuttleworth

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

onlamp.com: Jeremy and I were talking one day about how the world was changing so quickly, and we meant literally beneath our feet. To make a long story short, we decided to start an impromptu video podcast called, "Spotlight on FOSS," or Spotlight on Free and Open Source Software. Once we had our concept together we contacted a few connections, and came up an interview with Mark Shuttleworth.

Top 10 Linux FUD Patterns, Part 7

Filed under
Linux

linuxfud.wordpress: I finished compiling my tax return about a week ago…on paper. I do not do it as some form of corporal mortification nor does it have anything to do with the lack of tax software for Linux…ah, and that last point is a great segway into the next item on my Top 10 List, Linux software is always behind the curve.

Slax 6.0 on an Ancient Prestigio 109 Laptop

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: I decided to take a closer look at Slax, by getting the latest “Distribution Release” which is version 6.0.3. This time, I’m using our ancient Prestigio 109 laptop to fully check the features and capabilities of this tiny distro.

AMD Opteron 2356 Quad-Core "Barcelona" Review

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: When looking at the AMD Phenom 9500 under Linux, we had found this processor had posed a number of issues from kernel panics to other troubles. Released a month prior to the first Phenom desktop CPUs were the quad-core Opteron 2300 "Barcelona" processors. We have benchmarked the new Opteron 2356 in both single and dual CPU configurations and have compared the results -- under Linux -- to two of Intel's quad-core Xeon processors.

Linux is Good for the Elderly

Filed under
Linux

ubuntulinuxhelp.com: Some time ago, my father switched to Linux (Ubuntu). I think in some of the contributing factor to his switching was my excitement. I don’t know any other older people who use Linux, so I recently asked my father (he’s in his eighties and has been using Linux for about 6 years now) how he felt about Linux and what were some of his opinions.

Interview: Fedora developers Seth Vidal and Will Woods

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

fedoraproject.org: PreUpgrade is a new feature being developed for Fedora 9. It allows a user to do all the tedious work of a safe Anaconda upgrade in a running system that is still usable. This is the answer to every user who has ever wanted to do a live upgrade with yum, but been worried about the safety of doing this.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

25 things to love about Linux

Today marks 25 years of Linux, the most successful software ever. At LinuxCon this week, Jim Zemlin of the Linux Foundation spoke words of admiration, praise, and excitement from the keynote stage, saying "Linux at 25 is a big thing" and "You can better yourself while bettering others at the same time." To celebrate, we asked our readers what they love about Linux and rounded up 25 of their responses. Dive into the Linux love! Read more

GNU/FSF

Linux and Graphics

  • ContainerCon Vendors Offer Flexible Solutions for Managing All Your New Micro-VMs
    As you might expect, this week's LinuxCon and ContainerCon 2016, held in Toronto, is heavy on the benefits and pitfalls of deploying containers, but several vendors aim to come to the rescue with flexible tools to manage it all. Take Datadog, a New York-based company that offers scalable monitoring of your containerized infrastructure—and just about everything else—from a single interface. This is an off-premise, cloud-based tool that can monitor tens of thousands of your hosts and integrate with stuff you already know, like AWS, Cassandra, Docker, Kubernetes, Postgre and 150 other tools.
  • Happy Birthday Linux
    Linux turns 25 today. That's four years older than Linus was when he invented it. That means Linus has spent more of his life with Linux than he did without it
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.9 To Bring Virtual Display Support, Improved GPU Reset
    The first pull request has been submitted of new Radeon and AMDGPU DRM driver updates to be queued in DRM-Next for landing with the Linux 4.9 kernel. To look forward to Linux 4.9 even though Linux 4.8 is still weeks from being released is PowerPlay support for Iceland GPUs, improved GPU reset, UVD and VCE power-gating for Carrizo and Stoney, support for pre-initialized vRAM buffers, TTM clean-ups, virtual display support, and other low-level changes. Many bug fixes also present. The AMDGPU virtual display support is useful and we have been looking forward to it. GPU reset improvements are also welcome for better recovery when the GPU becomes hung. As is the case lately, most of these changes are focused around the newer AMDGPU DRM driver over the mature Radeon DRM code.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 Comes For Intel Haswell On Mesa
    For those running Intel Haswell processors, hope is not lost in seeing new versions of OpenGL extensions with the Intel Mesa driver.

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • This Android botnet relies on Twitter for its commands
  • Android Security Flaw Exposes 1.4B Devices [Ed: Alternative headline is, "Android is very popular, it has billions of users. And yes, security ain’t perfect." When did the press ever publish a headline like, "Windows flaw leaves 2 billion PCs susceptible for remote takeover?" (happens a lot)]
  • Wildfire ransomware code cracked: Victims can now unlock encrypted files for free
    Victims of the Wildfire ransomware can get their encrypted files back without paying hackers for the privilege, after the No More Ransom initiative released a free decryption tool. No More Ransom runs a web portal that provides keys for unlocking files encrypted by various strains of ransomware, including Shade, Coinvault, Rannoh, Rakhn and, most recently, Wildfire. Aimed at helping ransomware victims retrieve their data, No More Ransom is a collaborative project between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Intel Security, and Kaspersky Lab. Wildfire victims are served with a ransom note demanding payment of 1.5 Bitcoins -- the cryptocurrency favored by cybercriminals -- in exchange for unlocking the encrypted files. However, cybersecurity researchers from McAfee Labs, part of Intel Security, point out that the hackers behind Wildfire are open to negotiation, often accepting 0.5 Bitcoins as a payment. Most victims of the ransomware are located in the Netherlands and Belgium, with the malicious software spread through phishing emails aimed at Dutch speakers. The email claims to be from a transport company and suggests that the target has missed a parcel delivery -- encouraging them to fill in a form to rearrange delivery for another date. It's this form which drops Wildfire ransomware onto the victim's system and locks it down.