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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android L update for Google Nexus 4, 5, 7 and 10 to release in late October Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 7:10am
Story KDE Releases in the Future Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 7:05am
Story Preview Of AMD Radeon R9 290 Hawaii Open-Source Performance Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:58am
Story Why I don't distro-hop: Because work. And pain. Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:49am
Story Meet Sascha Meinrath - Akademy Keynote Speaker Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:41am
Story Is Open Source Becoming the De Facto Standard in the Data Center? Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:30am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:23am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:22am
Story Video: Which Super Hero Would the Linux Community Be? Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:09am
Story Cheapo Firefox OS mobes to debut in India – definitely not one for selfie-conscious users Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:03am

World of Goo

Filed under
Gaming

tuxradar.com: Two whizz-kid programmers exit EA, decide to create a game to enter the Independent Games Festival, snatch awards for design innovation and technical excellence, and Linux gets a cracking new game as a result.

EXT4 is improving the Linux experience

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: It’s a universal truth that all PCs are slow. All of them, no matter the hardware, no matter the OS, they’re slow. The faster it goes, the faster we want it to go. It’s never enough.

Handy binary packages

Filed under
OSS

polishlinux.org: On distribution of Linux programs. In response to the painful article, I’d like to touch the topic of a handy and easy way to install programs under Linux.

Free/Open Source Workout/Fitness Software for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Since I have a healthy goal for 2009, I’ve been looking for a program that can help me accomplish my objective. I found several workout/fitness desktop applications for my Linux box, but very few have satisfied my needs.

If you blog, Shutter will rock your socks

Filed under
Software

stefanoforenza.com: Yesterday night, I’ve been contacted on IRC by Vadim. Turned out he was in the development team of Shutter and told me to take a look to the new release (0.7).

Putting Open Source to the Mom Test

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-magazine.com: I stumbled across Amber's blog by accident today – she's writing a series of posts that document her experience installing and using Linux distros and a variety of open source applications.

So you want to run windows programs on Linux?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: It seems to be a big sticking point for windows users that they can't run their windows programs on Linux. They say they would use Linux if only they could run such and such windows program. Sounds to me like they wish to have their cake and eat it too.

Testing Fedora 11 Alpha on the HP tx2000z Tablet PC..

Filed under
Linux

securemind.org: In my anxious haste I’ve decided to try out Fedora 11 Alpha on my Tablet PC… I don’t expect many things work correctly but I figured it was worth trying out. To start with my tablet has a AMD Turion x2 64 so I downloaded this live cd torrent. My overall experience was as follows:

Mandriva 2009.0: Much improved since last year

Filed under
MDV

izanbardprince.wordpress: After having gone over 2009.0, both Free (on my desktop) and One (on my laptop), I feel that Mandriva 2009 is much improved, I’ll go over some talking points here.

Taking Ubuntu 9.04 Out For A Spin

Filed under
Ubuntu

itnewstoday.com: Earlier this week, I previewed Kubuntu 9.04, so I thought it would be a logical next step to preview Ubuntu 9.04 as well.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • RISC CPUs get Linux development service

  • Fedora trademark guidelines
  • Microsoft's secret plan behind the TomTom suit?
  • Mandriva 2009.0 KDE 4.2.1 packages available - With Qt 4.5.0 final
  • More Unix And Linux Wallpapers. Why, Work? Whyyyyyyy?
  • Red Hat's Plymouth Sees New Work
  • Trying out Songbird
  • Miro 2: A Mini-Review
  • NY Bill Proposes Tax Credit for Open Source Developers
  • Are consoles destined to be dead come the era of super Linux desktops?
  • Linux Gets Faster with Splashtop
  • Distribution of the week: BackTrack — Network Security Suite
  • Xen vs. Citrix Xenserver?
  • Open Source -- Is it Free?
  • Can we build a world with open source?
  • Cuba Gets an (Open) Hand from Brazil
  • Tiny x86-compatible CPU module runs Debian
  • Suicide Linux
  • EU lightens up on Microsoft

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Monitor CPU Speed with Gkfreq Plugin for Gkrellm

  • Using Gmail to Bypass “Email Already In Use” Errors
  • Using ssh as a generic stdin consumer and stdout producer
  • Remove trash in Ubuntu
  • How To Download Almost Any Web-Based Email Via POP
  • How To Find What Package Provided a File?
  • Bash tips: if -e wildcard file check => [: too many arguments
  • AOL on PCLinuxOS
  • Adjust sudo timeout
  • Qt-4.5.0 on Gentoo portage tree
  • Upgrading to PostgreSQL 8.3 on Gentoo

MSWord To OpenOffice And Back Again

Filed under
OOo

oneclicklinux.com: I've been working on a letter and needed a little bit of input. I called my brother Dave and he said he'd take a look at what I had composed so far.

The Flock Flap

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com: Dealing with rumors and gossip is like nailing jelly to the wall. The right (wrong?) ones take on a patina of truth they don't deserve, just because they sound right or we feel they should be right.

MythTV made easy

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: MythTV is an incredibly ambitious suite of applications designed to sit at the heart of your home entertainment centre. It records, pauses and rewinds television, plays music and videos, catalogues your photo and DVD collections, browses the internet, makes phone calls, delivers the news and the weather and plays games - and it does all this thanks to the power of Linux.

Dinner with Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

fsf.org: When you visit Microsoft's web site for New England Research & Development Center you don't get a sense that it is a part of a 30 year old multinational proprietary corporation with a bad track record when it comes to user freedom and community support. But, we aren't fooled.

Should Opera abandon the desktop?

Filed under
Software

kyleabaker.com: According to Nate Lanxon at CNET UK, yep. I’m not going to quote the whole “article,” but here are my thoughts.

Mozilla rethinks the behavior of new browser tabs

Filed under
Moz/FF

downloadsquad.com: A few months ago Mozilla embarked on a quest to determine a way to make new browser tabs more useful. Today Mozilla's Aza Raskin shared some of the team's conclusions, based on user feedback.

The Reality of Using Linux Every Day

Filed under
Linux

laptoplogic.com: "It's full of bugs. Nothing ever works. I can't get it to do what I want. It's too hard."

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming