Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GCC 4.9.1 Released Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 4:41pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 4:26pm
Story XBMC 13.2 Beta 1 “Gotham” Arrives with a Ton of Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 1:26pm
Story Manjaro 0.8.10 Receives Its Third Update Pack Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 1:14pm
Story Spotify migrate 5000 servers from Debian to Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 11:09am
Story The Next Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) Versions May Be Built Only On The Stable Versions Of Debian Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 9:41am
Story DistroWatch resolves its domain registrar problems Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 9:26am
Story How open source can solve Silicon Valley's engineering crisis Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 9:08am
Story Crowdfunding for open source software Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 9:03am
Story Cloud, open source power TransLink's Web presence Roy Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 9:00am

Linux- Where to Begin?

Filed under
Linux

pctechbytes.net/forums: You are probably reading this with questions about Linux, whether you are a frustrated with Microsoft Operating Systems, just curious about the advantages and disadvantages of Linux, or don't even know how to use a computer!

Is cash king of open source?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: There is an assumption throughout the financial press that since we’re down, cash is king. The extent to which this applies to open source, however, is something which deserves to be questioned.

Open source and the lone developer

Filed under
OSS

sutor.com: It occurred to be this morning when I was stuck in traffic that although a lot has been written about open source development for communities, much less is out there for the lone developer. This is the person who labors along by him- or herself, writing code and letting the world use it. Why might they do this?

Interview With Paul Cooper - GNOME Mobile

Filed under
Interviews

howsoftwareisbuilt.com: In this interview we talk with Paul. In specific, we talk about: Getting started with the GNOME project, Devices targeted by GNOME Mobile, and the Differences between GNOME and GNOME Mobile.

Xfce 4.6 Beta 3 (Tuco-Tuco) released

Filed under
Software

xfce.org: I am pleased to announce the release of Xfce 4.6 BETA-3. Just like with the previous BETA, this release comes with a lot of bugfixes but is not expected to be 100% stable.

Development Release: Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 3

Filed under
Ubuntu

distrowatch.com: Steve Langasek has announced the availability of the third alpha release of Ubuntu 9.04 "Jaunty Jackalope."

7 tech comics that will put a big smile on your face

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom.com: Sometimes you just need to take a short break, relax and have fun. A great way to do so is to check out some funny web comics, and we here at Pingdom are big fans of comics that dive into the slightly more geeky aspects of life.

The love for apt-get

Filed under
Software

the-gay-bar.com: In Linux circles RPM has a really bad reputation, the whole idea of "RPM-hell" (like Windows' DLL-hell) has spread through the years. It's a reputation that was really deserved in the past when getting exactly the right RPM for your distro was a huge pain.

Web browsers compared; Opera comes out on top

Filed under
Software

ajc.com: Many PC buyers assume there is one way to get onto the Internet — Internet Explorer. It’s already on the desktop, it seems to work, so why mess with a good thing? But these days there are many choices when it comes to browsers.

Why I Think Open Source Will “Win” In The End

Filed under
OSS

blog.eracc.com: Have you ever called or e-mailed Microsoft or some other software manufacturer’s technical support about a problem as a user? What was your result? Did the technical support personnel begin with the assumption that you were the problem, not their software?

Windows 7, A Linux User's Perspective

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxjournal.com: It’s no secret that I’m a Linux fan. I love it. I use it. I tell of its goodness far and wide. It’s also true, however, that I administer and use a variety of operating systems throughout any given day. This week, I tried out Windows 7 Beta.

Death of the CD, a new world for Linux?

raiden.net: One of the things that's been coming up over the past couple years is how CD's have effectively died as a music medium. Well, others, despite the rise of Blueray, have begun calling the death knell on the DVD and all disk media for movies.

Novelist hired for 'Doom 4'

Filed under
Gaming

news.zdnet.com: The original Doom didn't have much in the way of story. The bulk of the game consisted of running around shooting all the demons that came through that portal.

Linux vs. Windows: Which is a better Web host?

Filed under
OS

news.cnet.com: It used to be that choosing Windows or Linux to host your Web site made a big difference in the kind of functionality or services offered. On Friday, as this informative article on KnockOutHost.com suggests, the choice between Linux and Windows has become somewhat less stark.

Three SMALL Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: There are a number of different small/mini/tiny/whatever distributions available, and each has its own special strengths. I have been looking at three of them.

Linux Elitism: Fact or Fiction?

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Newcomers to open source software might be intimidated by the insider nature of the communities, but they shouldn't mistake that for elitism, writes LinuxInsider columnist Jeremiah T. Gray. Stick with it, and the benefits will become clear, he advises.

Will GPLv3 Kill GPL?

Filed under
OSS

links.org: I started looking at the LLVM project today, which is a replacement for the widely used gcc compiler for C and C++. I thought perhaps the interest in LLVM and clang (the C/C++ front end) were prompted by a sudden surge of interest in open source static analysis, but asking around, it seems it is not so.

Linux Mint 6.0 Felicia - Minty and sweet

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: I have already reviewed Linux Mint about a year ago - and already loved it back then. With version 6 out for grabs, I decided to see what new changes the latest version of Linux Mint brings.

Russia to create "National OS" Based on GNU/Linux?

Filed under
Linux

opendotdotdot.blogspot: Here's an interesting idea: for Russia to fund the creation of a "national operating system" to replace Windows, based on GNU/Linux:

Browser battle? They're more alike than different

Filed under
Software

news.cnet.com: A panel discussion among browser executives shed a little light on the philosophical differences between four major browsers (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, and Opera), but more than anything showed how these products are moving in the same direction.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.

Security News

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Cisco learned from Wikileaks that the CIA had hacked its systems
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping.
  • Exposed files on Microsoft's document-sharing site
    Confidential documents, passwords and health data have been inadvertently shared by firms using Microsoft's Office 365 service, say researchers. The sensitive information was found via a publicly available search engine that is part of Office 365. Security researchers said many firms mistakenly thought documents would only be shared with colleagues not globally. Microsoft said it would "take steps" to change the service and remove the sensitive data.
  • Russian Hacker Pleads Guilty for Role in Infamous Linux Ebury Malware
    The US Department of Justice announced yesterday that Maxim Senakh, 41, of Velikii Novgorod, Russia, pleaded guilty for his role in the creation of the Ebury malware and for maintaining its infamous botnet. US authorities indicted Senakh in January 2015, and the law enforcement detained the hacker in Finland in August of the same year.
  • Changes coming to TLS: Part One
    Transport layer Security version 1.3 (TLS 1.3) is the latest version of the SSL/TLS protocol which is currently under development by the IETF. It offers several security and performance improvements as compared to the previous versions. While there are several technical resouces which discuss the finer aspects of this new protocol, this two-part article is a quick reference to new features and major changes in the TLS protocol.

Red Hat and Fedora