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About Tux Machines

Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 10:40am
Story Material Design, Google Now Support and Timezone Autoupdate Will Come to Chrome OS Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 10:22am
Story More OpenELEC Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 10:00am
Story Top 5 Open Source Email Clients For Linux Mohd Sohail 30/03/2015 - 9:58am
Story Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) Now Based on Linux Kernel 3.19.2 Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:44am
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:42am
Story South-Tyrol finances open source eInvoicing tool Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:38am
Story Linux Mint Developers Launched a New Project Called mint-dev-tools Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:29am
Story HTC One E9 Specs News, Rumors: New 'Cheaper' Android Flagship Appears In Live Images Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:28am
Story Why Android 5.1 Is A Step Up From Android 5.0 Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:20am

Dell Ubuntu Recovery Tool Enhancements

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Configuring BT Mobile Broadband on Ubuntu 9.10…
  • Mythbuntu 9.10 (MythTV 0.22) installation
  • Dell Ubuntu Recovery Tool Enhancements
  • How to lock package versions from Synaptic package manager
  • Ubuntu Server Edition 9.10: No hardware required

Statement of Oracle Corporation

  • Statement of Oracle Corporation
  • EU issues objections to Oracle's Sun acquisition

Bright Computing Signs Agreement With Novell

Filed under
SUSE
  • Bright Computing Signs With Novell to Offer SLED With its Cluster
  • Microsoft, Novell say alliance still bearing fruit
  • Shiny new desktop: openSUSE 11.2 dual-headed goodness
  • Promoting Open Source Through Social Media

Firefox at 5: What We Love and Hate About You

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
  • Firefox at 5: What We Love and Hate About You
  • Five essential addons for new Firefox users (Happy fifth birthday, Firefox!)
  • Firefox at 5: the Google Cold War
  • Google shifts software value to operations, away from IP
  • Finish this sentence: "I ________ Google"

OpenOffice distances itself from OpenOfficeMouse, joins everyone else

Filed under
Hardware
OOo

engadget.com: Well, the OpenOfficeMouse rightly caused a bit of skepticism when it was officially announced earlier this week, and it turns out it is something of a fraud after all -- just not the way you might think.

Mandriva : First on Distrowatch for the last 7 days

Filed under
MDV

linux-wizard.net: I couldn't resist once I learn it on Facebook after a wall post by Blino: Mandriva is ranked at first position on Distrowatch for the last 7 days. This is awesome!

tnote: Simple is good

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: Simple is good. For a console note-taker, tnote is extremely simple.

Haleron’s Ocean OS for netbooks to support Android, Linux, Windows apps

Filed under
Linux

liliputing.com: Most companies that want to put out a netbook take a safe and well traveled route, but putting out a machine with extraordinarily ordinary specs: 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 CPU, 1GB of RAM, 160GB to 250GB hard drive, and Windows XP, Windows 7, or maybe a Linux distribution like Ubuntu or Linpus Linux Lite. Haleron isn’t most companies.

Free online multimedia conversion tools

Filed under
Software
Web

dedoimedo.com: Have a lot of multimedia files in all sorts of formats? Would you like some of the less known ones converted into friendly, popular formats that everyone can play? Do not really know where to start?

Banshee Gets "Digital Library" integration

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: If you use the Banshee Daily PPA you may have recently noticed* a new entry in the left hand menu panel: Internet Archive.

Where is the Linux desktop going?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: While I like the Linux desktop a lot, I don't pretend that it's that popular. Which, is why, I found it fascinating that, despite everything Microsoft has been able to throw at it, desktop Linux still managed to claim 32% of the netbook market.

Nepal sets example with school laptops

Filed under
OLPC

PCLinuxOS 2009.2 Installation Review

Filed under
PCLOS

alternativenayk.wordpress: In the days when Ubuntu 9.10, Mandriva 2010 and openSUSE 11.2 are having their releases, installing PCLinuxOS 2009.2 seems like taking a step backwards. But how could I refuse to try what I had considered to be my favourite Linux distro?

Advice Against Upgrading Ubuntu 9.04 to 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Advice Against Upgrading Ubuntu 9.04 to 9.10
  • The Linux-OEM complaint- Learn from Ubuntu
  • From Fedora 11 to Ubuntu 9.10

Riddle me this license, riddle me that.

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: The biggest difference between open source software and proprietary software, apart from being able to see the code, are the licenses governing their usage.

Open Source CMS market share report 2009

Filed under
Software
Drupal

buytaert.net: The 2009 Open Source CMS market share report was released a couple of weeks ago. The report concludes that WordPress, Joomla! and Drupal maintain a large lead on the rest of the pack.

Linux Helps Me Live a Stress-Free Life

Filed under
Linux

stephencuyos.com: Most of my day is spent in front of the computer. Thus a perfectly functioning machine is of vital importance to me. I do not want to worry about viruses and spyware. I do not want to have to defrag my harddisk every now and then or reboot everytime I install a new application. I do not want to worry about some malicious software.

How To Secure Your D-Link Wireless Router

Filed under
Hardware
HowTos

makeuseof.com: Security is probably the most important aspect of any computing experience and probably one of the most neglected. Let’s lock your door by securing your D-Link Wireless Router. Ok, off-topic, but by me, so go read it.

November 2009 Issue of The PCLinuxOS Mag Released

Filed under
PCLOS

The *NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine* staff is pleased to announce the release of the November 2009 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. Highlights include Command Line Interface Intro: Part 2, Dual Boot Windows 7 & PCLinuxOS, and Favorite Wallpaper Sites.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."

Review: Fedora 27 Workstation

On the whole there are several things to like about Fedora 27. The operating system was stable during my trial and I like that there are several session options, depending on whether we want to use Wayland or the X display server or even a more traditional-looking version of GNOME. I am happy to see Wayland is coming along to the point where it is close to on par with the X session. There are some corner cases to address, but GNOME on Wayland has improved a lot in the past year. I like the new LibreOffice feature which lets us sign and verify documents and I like GNOME's new settings panel. These are all small, but notable steps forward for GNOME, LibreOffice and Fedora. Most of the complaints I had this week had more to do with GNOME specifically than Fedora as an operating system. GNOME on Fedora is sluggish on my systems, both on the desktop computer and in VirtualBox, especially the Wayland session. This surprised me as when I ran GNOME's Wayland session on Ubuntu last month, the desktop performed quite a bit better. Ubuntu's GNOME on Wayland session was smooth and responsive, but Fedora's was too slow for me to use comfortably and I switched over to using the X session for most of my trial. Two other big differences I felt keenly between Ubuntu and Fedora were with regards to how these two leading projects set up GNOME. On Ubuntu we have a dock that acts as a task switcher, making it a suitable environment for multitasking. Fedora's GNOME has no equivalent. This means Fedora's GNOME is okay for running one or two programs at a time, but I tend to run eight or nine applications at any given moment. This becomes very awkward when using Fedora's default GNOME configuration as it is hard to switch between open windows quickly, at least without installing an extension. In a similar vein, Ubuntu's GNOME has window control buttons and Fedora's version does not, which again adds a few steps to what are usually very simple, quick actions. What it comes down to is I feel like Ubuntu takes GNOME and turns it into a full featured desktop environment, while Fedora provides us with just plain GNOME which feels more like a framework for a desktop we can then shape with extensions rather than a complete desktop environment. In fact, I think that describes Fedora's approach in general - the distribution feels more like a collection of open source utilities rather than an integrated whole. Earlier I mentioned LibreOffice can work with signed documents, but Fedora has no key manager, meaning we need to find and download one. Fedora ships with Totem, which is a fine video player, but it doesn't work with Wayland, making it an odd default choice. These little gaps or missed connections show up occasionally and it sets the distribution apart from other projects like openSUSE or Linux Mint where there is a stronger sense the pieces of the operating system working together with a unified vision. The big puzzle for me this week was with software updates. Linux effectively solved updating software and being able to keep running without a pause, reboot or lock-up decades ago. Other mainstream distributions have fast updates - some even have atomic, on-line updates. openSUSE has software snapshots through the file system, Ubuntu has live kernel updates that do away with rebooting entirely and NixOS has atomic, versioned updates via the package manager, to name just three examples. But Fedora has taken a big step backward in making updates require an immediate reboot, and taking an unusually long time to complete the update process, neither of which benefits the user. Fedora has some interesting features and I like that it showcases new technologies. It's a good place to see what new items are going to be landing in other projects next year. However, Fedora feels more and more like a testing ground for developers and less like a polished experience for people to use as their day-to-day operating system. Read more

6 Reasons Why Linux is Better than Windows For Servers

A server is a computer software or a machine that offers services to other programs or devices, referred to as “clients“. There are different types of servers: web servers, database servers, application servers, cloud computing servers, file servers, mail servers, DNS servers and much more. The usage share for Unix-like operating systems has over the years greatly improved, predominantly on servers, with Linux distributions at the forefront. Today a bigger percentage of servers on the Internet and data centers around the world are running a Linux-based operating system. Read more Also: All the supercomputers in the world moved to Linux operating systems

Android Leftovers