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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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OSS: Europe vs. The United States

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: Neelie Kroes is IT Chief for Europe and a staunch proponent of Open Source Software. A previous Linux Journal article made mention of her recent comments on OSS vs. proprietary software:

Red Hat Ignores Desktops - Consumer or Enterprise Whatsoever

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: We had been running CentOS 5.2 on dozens of our office-desktops. They were boringly stable though little obsolete. Finally I wanted to upgrade my system to the latest v.5.5 so as to use some of the updated packages including Firefox 3.5 and OpenOffice 3.

Helping your latest Linux release work with media

Filed under
HowTos

ghacks.net: I thought I’d take a bit of a break from the desktops (we’ll come back to a new alternative desktop soon) and help the users out with getting both Ubuntu 10.04 and Fedora 13 working with some of the popular media types.

OpenSolaris governing board threatens dissolution

Filed under
OS

h-online.com: In an act of desperation, the OpenSolaris governing board (OGB) has issued an ultimatum to Oracle. The company must nominate a contact person able to take decisions regarding OpenSolaris by the 16th of August or the board will dissolve and relinquish control of OpenSolaris to Oracle.

How To Make An Ubuntu 10.04 Desktop Resemble A Mac (With Elementary, Docky & Gloobus-Preview)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This article shows how you can change the appearance of your Ubuntu 10.04 desktop so that it resembles a Mac. This can be achieved with the help of Elementary, Docky, and Gloobus-Preview. Elementary is a project that provides a popular icon set and GTK theme; Docky is an interactive dock (like the one you know from a Mac) that provides easy access to some of the files, folders, and applications on your computer, and more; and Gloobus-Preview is an extension for the Gnome Desktop Environment designed to enable a full screen preview of any kind of file or directory.

6 tips for using the XML flavor of HTML5

Filed under
Web

6 recommendations for developers using the next generation of the web's native language

Debian Project News

Filed under
Linux

Linux game console adds GPU, accelerometers

Filed under
Hardware

linuxfordevices.com: GamePark Holdings (GPH) is readying a new version of its GP2X handheld game console running open source Linux games.

Open Source Business Models Become More Attractive

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: The news that Kenneth Bosung had joined OpenGeo as senior VP might have seemed like little more than a glorified press release to some. But there was an interesting twist there - Bosung had spent his entire career thus far with proprietary software companies.

Four reasons you'll want Firefox 4

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.computerworld: Firefox has begun to feel slow and dated. But Firefox 4 may change all that. Here are four reasons you'll want to switch to Firefox 4.

BDSM - The perfect operating system

Filed under
Humor

dedoimedo.com: Making an operating system that works on the principle of sin and punishment sounds like a darn good idea. Today, computer users use and misuse their machines any which way, with no regard to their digital health. There's no accountability, save for really dire things. Most of what we do with and to our computers is whim, accident, monkey-learned habit, and maybe, just maybe, a bit of productivity.

Mandriva and Derivative Release Latest

Filed under
PCLOS
MDV

linuxjournal.com: After a long and anxious month of delays, Mandriva finally released their 2010.1 Spring update with lots of goodies for all. In related news, PCLinuxos, a derivative of Mandriva, released what they've dubbed their Quarterly ISO updates in several flavors.

How An Old Pentium 4 System Runs With Ubuntu 10.04, 10.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Last October I wrote about running Ubuntu 9.10 with older PC hardware, but over this past weekend I restored an even older Phoronix test system to see how it runs with the most recent Ubuntu 10.04 LTS release and the very latest Ubuntu 10.10 development snapshot in relation to the older Ubuntu 8.04.4 LTS.

SMPlayer and GNOME Mplayer - Mplayer Based players

Filed under
Software

echdrivein.com: If you like mplayer, you will love SMPlayer and Gnome-Mplayer. Both SMplayer and Gnome-Mplayer are really good MPlayer front-ends and they do work great. SMplayer has long been my favorite multimedia player in Ubuntu and we have even featured SMplayer among the most wanted multimedia apps for Ubuntu.

Is Chrome OS a Threat to Ubuntu or Windows?

earthweb.com: Since late 2009, talk of how Google's Chrome OS is being positioned to "take on" Microsoft Windows has been promoted by individuals who I believe have no idea what they're talking about.

Parted Magic 5.0 released

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Just one week after the first release candidate arrived, the Parted Magic developers have released version 5.0 of their open source, multi-platform partitioning tool. Parted Magic can be used to create, move, delete and resize drive partitions and will run on a machine with as little as 64MB of RAM.

SystemRescueCd 1.5.6

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: SystemRescueCD is a free, Linux-based CDROM image for system recovery that boots into a minimal graphical interface and provides a host of useful tools culled from many sources.

Five tips to make your bash life easier

blogs.techrepublic.com: A number of tricks and shortcuts can save you time and keystrokes when you’re using bash to knock out various chores. Here are five handy tips to get you started.

Even as SCO dies, the company lies

blogs.computerworld.com: This would be funny if only there weren't people out there who are fool enough to believe in any anti-Linus lie. I mean, how dead does SCO have to be before its anti-Linux FUD finally disappears into the history books?

LinuxUser kernel column #89

Filed under
Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: Last month saw the opening and subsequent closing of the 2.6.35 kernel’s merge window, the period of time during which all of the exciting new features that have been waiting in the wings (and in linux-next nightly kernels provided by Stephen Rothwell) are considered for merging into the official ‘mainline’ kernel source tree by Linus Torvalds. Recent releases have often added

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More on Tesla's Compliance

10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more