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Tuesday, 23 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story This Week's Fedora Delay, Sparky Review, and New SteamOS Rianne Schestowitz 12/09/2014 - 6:53am
Story Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps Rianne Schestowitz 12/09/2014 - 1:16am
Story CD-Sized Image Of BSD-Based TrueOS Released For Servers Rianne Schestowitz 12/09/2014 - 1:08am
Story Retrogaming With Linux Rianne Schestowitz 12/09/2014 - 1:02am
Story AXIOM Beta Open-Source Camera Moves Closer To Reality Rianne Schestowitz 12/09/2014 - 12:50am
Story Running The Oibaf PPA On Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 9:11pm
Story Fedora 21 Alpha to slip by one week Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 8:52pm
Story There is no reason at all to use MySQL: Michael Widenius Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 8:45pm
Story Kolab creates a privacy refugee camp in Switzerland Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 8:06pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 7:51pm

The Perfect Server - OpenSUSE 11.1 [ISPConfig 3]

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to prepare an OpenSUSE 11.1 server for the installation of ISPConfig 3, and how to install ISPConfig 3.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • An Early Look At OpenSolaris 2009.06

  • Scribus and Linux and Comic Strips
  • Find the right Firefox add-ons
  • Worst of the week (roundup)
  • Mother and Ubuntu
  • Linux version of TwickerTape now available
  • Some Off-Season Linux Humor
  • Star Wars Vs. Star Trek: Some Off-Topic Humor
  • Q&A: When Mobility and Open Source Collide
  • Awesome Ubuntu
  • FLOSS Weekly 62: eBox
  • Acer Aspire One D150 running Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to write an interactive shell script

  • How to update ALSA to latest version easily
  • Making a Screencast in Linux
  • Get PDF Word Count In Linux
  • TuxCards - Hierarical notebook for TuxFreaks
  • A handful of Firefox tweaks that will double speed
  • Fixing mplayer Sound
  • How to prepare a system for kernel crash dump analysis
  • Kill X session in Jaunty Jackalope
  • Hudzilla Coding Academy: Project Seven

BitDefender Antivirus for Unices

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Just because you use Linux, it doesn't mean your computer doesn't have viruses or worms. Virus is a catch-all phrase, and BitDefender's designed to catch them all - from executable viruses, script viruses, macro viruses, to backdoors, trojans, spyware, adware, diallers, and more.

Beware of so-called Linux proponents

Filed under
Linux

thebeezspeaks.blogspot: Every now and then you stumble across a blog that is run by a so-called Linux enthusiast. But when you start to look a little closer, you will see that they spread the SOFUD.

The Year of the Linux-powered Robots

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: In the very near future, robots will become an indispensable tool that man can’t live without. Just like computers. At the moment, there are already different kinds of robots that run on Linux.

Dreamlinux 3.5 Review - Desktop Emphasis

Filed under
Linux

superphysics.awardspace.com: I have been distro hopping a lot in recent times. I was testing a lot of the less known Linuxes but never came across one that had no big problem. Of course, Dreamlinux is a fairly popular Linux distro.

A Short Review of OpenSolaris 2008.11

Filed under
OS

blog.hydrasystemsllc.com: I decided to finally check out OpenSolaris 2008.11. While this release came out back in November of 2008 (hence the 2008.11 naming convention), it has taken me this long to finally give it a chance. Maybe it is because I am still somewhat skeptical with the whole OpenSolaris Project.

Deciding Which Linux Flavor is Best

Filed under
Linux

linuxdistrochoices.com: Even the smallest amount if research into Linux will have illustrated the sheer range of distributions out there. They are all based on the original Linux kernel built by Linus Torvalds (the father of modern Linux) and can all interoperate to varying degrees.

full circle magazine #23, hot from the digital presses!

Filed under
Ubuntu

We’ve got a whole lot of Full Circle goodness for you in this issue! This month: Command and Conquer - Troubleshooting, How-To : Program in C, and Becoming An Ubuntu User.

New Intel IGP Appears In Linux 2.6.30 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The merge window for the Linux 2.6.30 kernel is now open and Linus has already accepted a horde of new patches for this next quarterly Linux update.

Pains of OpenSource or Price for Going Free

Filed under
Software

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: In the earlier posts it is mentioned in details of how we planned to move to Linux. But there are still a few glitches that turns it down.

Wolvix 2 - Hungry like the wolf

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Wolvix is a friendly Slackware-based distribution, featuring the Xfce desktop and a lovely bunch of applications to suit every soul, while leaning on the traditional stability of the Slackware family for rock-solid support. That was my impression the last time I tried Wolvix, version 1.1 called Hunter.

The World Beyond Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

polishlinux.org: I started looking at the possible courses of action to happen if Microsoft vanished. What would a Microsoft-free world look like ?

Top 10 Free Linux Games in 2009

Filed under
Gaming

blog.taragana.com: I have seen a lot of gamers who feel that there aren't good games to play on Linux. There's an array of free open source games waiting to run on the Linux platform. So I got the top linux games in 2009. And here I come.

Linux is about choice (pt 2)

Filed under
Linux

nthrbldyblg.blogspot: Part two of my rant deals with another situation that is slightly different - "Why then, do applications (or their developers) decide to take away [or keep] that choice?"

Video Interview with Kernel Developer Peter Anvin

Filed under
Linux

linuxpromagazine.com: Bootloader Syslinux developer Peter Anvin, since 1992 kernel developer, gives an insight into his work. In the video, he tells of how Intel let him "get on with his Linux thing" while at the same time seek his advice in Linux matters, which he enjoys.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Comparing boot performance of Ext3, Ext4, and XFS on Ubuntu

  • How To Install Boxee In Ubuntu Linux
  • Using Named Pipes (FIFOs) with Bash
  • Configure a Linux Firewall with Webmin
  • What is Btrfs?
  • Avoid Typing with Autokey
  • Gentoo on the Eee PC
  • Today’s technology WTFLOL, courtesy of Microsoft
  • Using N95 as modem for Ubuntu 8.10
  • Is Using Linux Too Frugal?
  • Linux Basement: Episode 38 - Ramblings and OpenVZ
  • Linux Void 24 - Late Late Late Show
  • Security update for OpenSSL
  • I just had an Epiphany
  • Slideshow: Xandros Presto Beta
  • Yes to new open source business models, no to whinging
  • Writing GNOME Docs, Part III (Let’s write some code!)
  • Beta Testers
  • iGod, the Linux-loving Cyber God
  • Linux Humor: RTFM Man Page

Gnome 2.26 - Small review of interesting features

Filed under
Software

blog.mageprojects: Lets do the same order as the gnome release notes only with my opinion about them and of the items that deserve a little more attention.

Switching to Linux

Filed under
PCLOS

oldfool.org: I started using the PCLinuxOS Linux distribution around 5 years ago. One day in a moment of disgust with Microsoft XP I downloaded a copy of PCLOS .92 and ran it on my PC.

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Android Leftovers

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OSS Leftovers

  • Nextcloud 12 Officially Released, Adds New Architecture for Massive Scalability
    Nextcloud informs Softpedia today about the official availability of the final release of Nextcloud 12, a major milestone of the self-hosting cloud server technology that introduces numerous new features and improvements. The biggest new feature of the Nextcloud 12 release appears to be the introduction of a new architecture for massive scalability, called Global Scale, which is a next-generation open-source technology for syncing and sharing files. Global Scale increases scalability from tens of thousands of users to hundreds of millions on a single instance, while helping universities and other institutions significantly reduce the costs of their existing large installations.
  • ReactOS 0.4.5 Open-Source Windows-Compatible OS Launches with Many Improvements
    ReactOS 0.4.5 is a maintenance update that adds numerous changes and improvements over the previous point release. The kernel has been updated in this version to improve the FreeLoader and UEFI booting, as well as the Plug and Play modules, adding support for more computers to boot ReactOS without issues.
  • Sprint Debuts Open Source NFV/SDN Platform Developed with Intel Labs
    AT&T has been the headliner in the carrier race to software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). But Sprint is putting its own stamp on the space this week with its debut of a new open source SDN/NFV mobile core solution.
  • Google’s New Home for All Things Open Source Runs Deep
    Google is not only one of the biggest contributors to the open source community but also has a strong track record of delivering open source tools and platforms that give birth to robust technology ecosystems. Just witness the momentum that Android and Kubernetes now have. Recently, Google launched a new home for its open source projects, processes, and initiatives. The site runs deep and has several avenues worth investigating. Here is a tour and some highlights worth noting.
  • Making your first open source contribution
  • Simplify expense reports with Smart Receipts
    The app is called Smart Receipts, it's licensed AGPL 3.0, and the source code is available on GitHub for Android and iOS.
  • How the TensorFlow team handles open source support
    Open-sourcing is more than throwing code over the wall and hoping somebody uses it. I knew this in theory, but being part of the TensorFlow team at Google has opened my eyes to how many different elements you need to build a community around a piece of software.
  • IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot
    Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.