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Monday, 25 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Samba Updated for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 8:46pm
Story 'Windows Must Go Open Source': What Happened? Rianne Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 8:30pm
Story It's Windows *10*, Because It's 10 Years Behind Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 8:23pm
Story Google just made it easier to run Linux on your Chromebook Rianne Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 8:19pm
Story Tizen Starts 2015 With a Bang Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 8:09pm
Story Sub-$100 Cortex-A5 dev board accepts Arduino shields Rianne Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 8:05pm
Story The Companies That Support Linux: Planisys Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 8:01pm
Story Review: Two Android Wear Watches That Are (Almost) Worth Buying Rianne Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 7:55pm
Story Linus Torvalds to Patch the Kernel for a Witcher 2 Problem Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 7:54pm
Story Weekend Viewing: Catch up on LCA 2015 Roy Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 7:48pm

more chrome

  • Should Google kill the Chrome OS?
  • Google Chrome: one year on
  • Enable flash and use themes in Google Chrome Linux

Ultimate Download Management guide for Linux

Filed under
Software

penguininside.blogspot: When I got started with Linux, The one thing I couldn’t find was good download managers. but today we have plenty of them, in fact what we have on Linux is simply better than Adware/Shareware download managers on Windows. In this guide, I’m going to tell you the various ways for good and reliable download management on Linux.

The human face of the FSFE

Filed under
OSS

blogs.fsfe.org: The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is an organization that does a lot of behind-the-scenes things, mostly policy and legal, which can be a little hard to see at times. Of course we are always happy to support Free Software projects manage the legal and organizational aspects of, um, projecthood.

More Chrome OS clues - bootable browser?

Filed under
OS

downloadsquad.com: After a second (or is it third?) round of possible Chrome OS images captured by the ever-popular A. Nonymous Tipster on his trusty-but-low-res digital camera, speculation around Google's ethereal OS is bound to keep heating up.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Is there a ChromiumOS to go with ChromeOS?
  • Easily Install Fonts In Ubuntu With FontMatrix
  • Boog, the desktop bugzilla client for Fedora
  • Using GSmartControl In Ubuntu Linux
  • Get Hands on OpenSUSE at LinuxCon
  • Game Over for Sony
  • Google browser gets Sony foothold
  • Skype Dials New Owner… And Open Source
  • Lets work together.
  • Noteworthy PCLinuxOS updates (Aug 23rd – Aug 29th)
  • Ubuntu TechBoard 2009
  • Jaunty, Arch and Alsa
  • about:mozilla 9/2
  • Accelerating X with Gallium
  • SFLC Podcast: Episode 0x15: Steve Holden of Python

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HOWTO: Auto launch programs/scripts on LXDE startup
  • Use the same GTK theme for applications started as root
  • Make Ubuntu remember the applications you had open when you last logged out
  • three ways to install alsa drivers
  • A gentle routing tutorial
  • AcetoneISO: Manage CD/DVD images with ease on Ubuntu
  • Graudit – Code Audit Tool Using Grep
  • Gain more battery life from your Linux-based laptop with powertop
  • Instant Lan File Sharing with Python

5 Great opensource games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

unixmen.com: Here are 5 Nice opensource games for Linux , I installed the games on ubuntu and they did work fine, I liked more Supertux perhaps because is similar to super mario bros one my favorite games, the rest of the games are nice ones also with nice music and good graphics.

The File Menu

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: The File menu has been around since the dawn of user interfaces. But do you know what? It has overstayed its welcome. The File menu has been abused in far too many applications.

Windows And Linux Users Get Another Great VM Option

Filed under
Software

bmighty.com/blog: Parallels, Inc. is a company best known for its Mac-based virtualization software. This week, however, it finally delivered an updated version of its Windows- and Linux-based products.

4 Resources for the Powerful Inkscape Open Source Drawing Tool

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Among advanced open source graphics tools, GIMP has a lot of fans, and there are many free online resources available for it, but if you're looking for a drawing and illustration tool that can compete with Adobe Illustrator and is especially good for logos and splashy still graphics, give Inkscape a try.

Kindle DX Impressions

jonobacon.org: The Kindle. I have been wanting to buy one of these babies for a while, and when I kept reading about people buying my book on them, read Mike’s generally positive blatherings, and wanted something to read for my honeymoon last week, I gave in and bought one.

The 'Linuxification' of Windows has begun

Filed under
Linux
Software

Randall C. Kennedy, InfoWorld: It's like a cancer: a creeping, deadly disease that slowly erodes all that's good and clean, replacing it with a swill of malignancy and decrepitude. I'm speaking, of course, of the recent appearance of Linux UI conventions under Windows.

Fedora from an Ubuntu point of view

Filed under
Linux

blog.lynxworks.eu: In the interests of not becoming blinkered to one distribution, I thought I might give Fedora 11 a whirl. Not having used Fedora since FC4, I was surprised to see the adoption of a live CD installation and relieved to avoid a DVD size download. Just like Ubuntu it’s well polished, perhaps more so with graphical grub.

Grants, bounties and free software

Filed under
OSS

stormyscorner.com: The GNOME community has had mixed results with bounties and grants, so when Funambol community manager Stefano Maffulli contacted me about a GNOME grant and said they'd had success using grants for Funambol, I thought it'd be interesting to learn more about the program.

Building Linux Audio Apps 101: A User's Guide, Part 1

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linuxjournal.com: Recently I've received some mail asking for a brief explanation on how to build Linux audio applications from source code packages. Ask and ye shall receive, hence the following simple guide for the perplexed, the puzzled, and the downright mystified. Compiling software is hardly rocket science, and if an old guitar-picker like myself can do it certainly you can too.

Ubuntu Netbook Remix UI Gets Tweaked Again

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntumini.com: Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala Alpha 4 brings another Ubuntu Netbook Remix user interface redesign. The colors has been lighted, the menus now dynamically resize to allow more of the background to be seen and launcher animations have returned.

KDE 4.3.1 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: A month has passed since the release of KDE 4.3.0, so today the KDE Community announces the immediate availability of KDE 4.3.1, a bugfix, translation and maintenance update for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop.

Linux powers world's fastest stock exchange

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: The Deutsche Borse Group manages the International Securities Exchange, an equity options exchange, in New York and the Eurex and Deutsche Borse's own Xetra cash exchange. The Xetra stock exchange platform is also used by the Irish Stock Exchange, the European Energy Exchange, and the Shanghai Stock Exchange among others. It's long used Linux as the basis of these high-speed stock exchanges.

Shooter's gallery: the 10 most influential FPS games

Filed under
Gaming

telegraph.co.uk: Although it was preceded by id Software's Catacomb 3D, Wolfenstein 3D is widely recognised as the father of the first-person-shooter game and the title which spawned one of the most popular genres in the gaming industry.

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More in Tux Machines

Packet radio lives on through open source software

Packet radio is an amateur radio technology from the early 1980s that sends data between computers. Linux has natively supported the packet radio protocol, more formally known as AX.25, since 1993. Despite its age, amateur radio operators continue to use and develop packet radio today. A Linux packet station can be used for mail, chat, and TCP/IP. It also has some unique capabilities, such as tracking the positions of nearby stations or sending short messages via the International Space Station (ISS). Read more

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you. Read more