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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Helps Me Live a Stress-Free Life

Filed under
Linux

stephencuyos.com: Most of my day is spent in front of the computer. Thus a perfectly functioning machine is of vital importance to me. I do not want to worry about viruses and spyware. I do not want to have to defrag my harddisk every now and then or reboot everytime I install a new application. I do not want to worry about some malicious software.

How To Secure Your D-Link Wireless Router

Filed under
Hardware
HowTos

makeuseof.com: Security is probably the most important aspect of any computing experience and probably one of the most neglected. Let’s lock your door by securing your D-Link Wireless Router. Ok, off-topic, but by me, so go read it.

November 2009 Issue of The PCLinuxOS Mag Released

Filed under
PCLOS

The *NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine* staff is pleased to announce the release of the November 2009 issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. Highlights include Command Line Interface Intro: Part 2, Dual Boot Windows 7 & PCLinuxOS, and Favorite Wallpaper Sites.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 328

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: First look at Mandriva Linux 2010
  • News: openSUSE 11.2 Gold Master, Fedora 12 crunch time, Ubuntu media coverage, Sabayon 5.1 updates, Puppy and BackTrack server compromises, Jolicloud for your netbook
  • Questions and answers: Distributions and real-time Linux kernel
  • Released last week: Mandriva Linux 2010, Moblin 2.1, Scientific Linux 5.4
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.2
  • Donations: OpenSSH receives US$350
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Is Microsoft Experimenting With the Open Source Model?

Filed under
Microsoft

itnewstoday.com: Microsoft is the largest software company in the world, a point to which I think just about everyone will agree. They have used a closed source model for their entire existence, but their recent actions make me wonder if they are experimenting with the idea of becoming at least somewhat open source.

When should you take up a new file system?

raiden.net: One of the questions that's been thrown at me of late is "When should I take up a new file system?" To explain this a little farther, the user is asking more or less how soon they should adopt one of the newer file systems in place of the older.

Tweaking my Karmic Koala

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Tweaking my Karmic Koala
  • Ubuntu 9.10 netbook remix on ASUS EEE 701
  • Ubuntu 9.10 text-installer review
  • Ubuntu Karmic Koala – Clean Install vs Upgrade
  • 64-bit Flash in Ubuntu

Firefox At Five: 'Web Freedom May Not Last'

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox At Five: 'Web Freedom May Not Last'
  • five years of firefox
  • Firefox Tops Vulnerability List
  • After 5 years, Firefox faces new challenges
  • Images: Firefox through the ages

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Computerbank installs Ubuntu on recycled PCs
  • Windows 7 the morning after? & Novell has a pulse?
  • Aptlinex – Web browser addon to install Ubuntu packages with a click
  • The Dangers of Gentoo Linux on a Slow System
  • GNOME Marketing Hackfest & Chicago GNOME Meetup
  • MythTV Theming and UI Patch Contest
  • Nonprofit Laptops: A Dream Not Yet Over
  • HTML5 YouTube viewer: close, but not quite there
  • KS2009: How Google uses Linux
  • Pseudoform
  • IP Filtering Program Similar to PeerGuardian for Linux - iplist
  • "Dawn of Ubuntu" Returns
  • The Computer Action Show! Season 1 Episode 7

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install OpenGoo for in house collaboration tools
  • Apache troubleshooting tips
  • LiveCD’s and MD5SUMS – A Tutorial
  • How to get Hard disk, CPU infomation, and temp in Ubuntu
  • How to record audio playing on your computer using Audacity
  • Using color in shell scripts (Linux, Mac OS X)
  • Drupal Site with temporary URL
  • Using BitlBee to consolidate instant messaging into one client
  • My desktop backup solution
  • Pavilion two fingers touchpad scrolling
  • Ubuntu 9.10 Installing Microsoft Office 2007

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #167

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #167 for the week November 1st - November 7th, 2009 is available.

Fedora 12 rocks on tablets

Filed under
Linux

mairin.wordpress: Got a tablet, or want to get one, but not sure it’s going to work out in Linux? Here’s how my Thinkpad x61’s built-in Wacom tablet works in Fedora 12 Beta:

Where To Find Real Geeks On The Web

Filed under
Web

penguinpetes.com: We won't go into what exactly makes one a geek here (hint: it has something to do with knowledge, learning, books, skills, and technology, but not fandom). If you are it, you know it. And if you're looking for it, you know it. So here's some pointers to places where the original geek culture is still alive.

Plugins aren't always a good choice

Filed under
Software

blog.flameeyes.eu: I used to be an enthusiast about plugin interfaces; with time, though, I started having more and more doubts about their actual usefulness.

New Fav Distro (F '09)

Arch
9% (237 votes)
Debian
6% (171 votes)
Fedora/Cent/RH
6% (167 votes)
Gentoo
3% (74 votes)
Mandriva
8% (232 votes)
Mint
7% (184 votes)
openSUSE
15% (421 votes)
PCLinuxOS
11% (305 votes)
Puppy
2% (58 votes)
Sabayon
1% (31 votes)
SimplyMepis
2% (49 votes)
Slackware
4% (111 votes)
*ubuntu
22% (615 votes)
Other
3% (86 votes)
Total votes: 2741

Hidden Linux : What the fsck?

Filed under
HowTos

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Linux's file system check utility fsck is little recognised and largely unloved, no doubt because it seems to know whenever you're in a hurry to boot your machine. Then - and why is it only then? - it starts doing what it was designed for -

Revelation: Why I Still Use Microsoft Word

Filed under
OOo

junauza.com: Even though I use Linux on my main workstation, I have to admit that I can't live without Microsoft Word so I have it installed through Wine and VirtualBox.

Like GetDeb? Now you can get their packages from a repo

Filed under
Software
Web

nancib.wordpress: One of the best ways to get updated software for Debian-based distros, is from GetDeb.net. They’ve recently launched an updated site for users of Ubuntu 9.04 and newer, and one of the great new benefits is that they now have a repository you can add to your sources.list.

KDE, one year later

Filed under
KDE

ardchoille42.blogspot: Back in November of 2008 I attempted to migrate to KDE. That migration proved to be a lesson in futility. Today I installed Kubuntu Kubuntu 9.10 on three different computers to see how much progress this once awesome distro has made in a year. This is what I found:

How to pay for Linux

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Now you may be thinking, after reading the title of this article, about why should you pay for a free operating system. After all it is made for free, distributed for free and you are freely able to modify it. You are free to take it and you are free to leave it. So why should you pay for it?

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."