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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Myth-Busting Google's Android Problem Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 7:37am
Story On Linus Torvalds and communities Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 7:28am
Story Adjusting PulseAudio to play .wav files without distortion Fitzcarraldo 19/01/2015 - 1:13am
Story Developers Close GTK+ Bug in Ubuntu That Allowed Users to Bypass the Lock Screen Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:46pm
Story Linux Mint 18 Could Adopt Systemd Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:43pm
Story The TrackingPoint 338TP, the Linux Rifle that's accurate up to a mile Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:36pm
Story NVIDIA Releases Massive Stable Driver, Brings Support for Latest Kernels and X.org Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:31pm
Story Manjaro XFCE 0.9.0-pre1 edition released Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:23pm
Story Linux 3.19-rc5 Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:11pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 9:04pm

Reviewed: Scribus 1.3.5

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: We've reviewed Scribus a number of times, each revisit tends to throw up the same old problems: Scribus's lack of reliability and poor interface. Thankfully, after two years of solid development, these woes have been banished.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Pimp your GIMP with Photoshop Brushes
  • LXDE on Android smartphone!
  • Mandriva 2010 beta: Screenshots
  • New Lugaru for Linux released
  • Why zsh rocks
  • GNU Hackers Meeting 2009 registration opens
  • BSD… ish
  • Book Excerpt: Troubleshooting Ubuntu Server
  • On the PySide - interview
  • Get out the Vote: 2009 Open Source CMS Award
  • VIA Releases A New 2D Linux Driver
  • Music Player Review: Heavyweights
  • GoogleDocs integration with Nautilus
  • FSF hosts a mini-summit on Women in Free Software
  • Sub-menus in KDE 4 panels and desktops are back
  • NVIDIA Pushes Out New Linux Driver Updates
  • Rails-like Quickly tools brings rapid development to Ubuntu
  • VMware drags its feet on Linux-based vCenter appliance, annoys Linux users
  • Opera Unite - Unite Unite the World
  • The Linode Virtual Hosting Solution
  • Take off and land safely with KDE
  • 15 Text Editors for Linux
  • An explosive end to a holiday
  • The SCO zombie wins one
  • Ubuntu User Issue 2 is out
  • Build Your Own Open Source Digital Clock
  • Say I am from Egypt: Show me respect, show me my time

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OpenOffice File Thumbnails In Nautilus
  • Firefox's missing throbber
  • How to Configure File Associations in KDE
  • Change default and preferred applications in KDE
  • Name Kompletion in Konqueror
  • Monitor your system for threats with rsec alerts
  • Tutorial: Fix invalid entries in Open Office 3 spell check
  • Install RAID 1 in Fedora/Centos/RHEL
  • Install Doom3 Game

This Day in Tech: Aug. 25, 1991: Kid From Helsinki Foments Linux Revolution

Filed under
Linux

wired.com: 1991: Linus Torvalds, a 21-year-old university student from Finland, writes a post to a user group asking for feedback on a little project he’s working on. He’s built a simple kernel for a Unix-like operating system.

Chicken Invaders For Linux !

Filed under
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: The Arcade Space shooters "Chicken Invaders" 2, 3 and their Special Christmas Editions are available for Linux!

Noteworthy PCLinuxOS updates (Aug 16th – Aug 22nd)

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxonline.com: Another exciting week has past already! Can you believe it? Well here’s the latest updates to the PCLinuxOS repository over the past week.

Fedora Rawhide nightly live spins available

Filed under
Linux
Software

Adam Williamson reports that the Fedora project is now producing automated nightly live builds of Rawhide, its development branch - now you can test the freshest Rawhide without having to install it at all.

SimplyMEPIS Linux 8.0

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Certain distributions tend to get more press than others. SimplyMEPIS isn’t one. It’s a shame though as SimpyMEPIS has quite a bit to offer the desktop Linux user as you’ll find out in this review.

Review: Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

v3.co.uk: The most popular of the free Linux distros, the 10th and latest release of Ubuntu Linux (9.04, also known as Jaunty Jackalope) is available for both servers and desktops.

Program Which Automatically Compiles and Install The Latest Kernel in Ubuntu / Debian: KernelCheck

Filed under
Ubuntu

KernelCheck is a a program that automatically compiles and installs the latest Kernel for Debian based Linux distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, etc.). The program also allows for automatic installation of proprietary video drivers via EnvyNG.

10 habits of superstitious users

Filed under
Misc

blogs.techrepublic.com: For some users, the computer is unfathomable - leading them to make bizarre assumptions about technology and the effect of their own actions. Here are a few irrational beliefs such users develop.

Red Hat HornetQ debuts for open source messaging

Filed under
Software

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat today officially launched a new open source messaging system called HornetQ. The new effort has its roots in the JBoss Messaging platform, that has been around since at least 2006.

The Ubuntu Welfare Program

Filed under
Ubuntu

daniweb.com/blogs: Since its inception in 2004, Ubuntu has been the beneficiary in what seems like a bottomless money pit for South African entrepreneur, Mark Shuttleworth via his commercial support and development venture, Canonical. How long can anyone keep pumping money into a project that might not ever turn a profit?

Reading “The Art of Community”

Filed under
OSS

randomink.org: Jono has been active and visible in various communities and, I expected his enthusiasm to reflect in the writing. The book is a good one and, definitely worth a read.

Early Ubuntu 9.10, OpenSuSE 11.2, Mandriva 2010 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Last week we provided benchmarks of Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 4, but Ubuntu is not the only Linux distribution preparing for a major update in the coming months. Also released in the past few days were OpenSuSE 11.2 Milestone 6 and Mandriva Linux 2010.0 Beta 1. To see how these three popular distributions compare, we set out to do our usual Linux benchmarking dance.

The APT2 project

Filed under
Software

juliank.wordpress: I just started working on a replacement for APT written in Vala and called APT2 (I know, the name could be better). The main idea behind the project is to create a library for working with Debian repositories and packages, and on top of this library a few applications.

Why Has Nokia's Netbook Got Windows, Not Linux?

eweekeurope.co.uk: We knew Nokia had a netbook up its sleeve, but why go with Microsoft Windows? Because Nokia's user interface skills aren't good enough, and Linux would delay it, says Peter Judge

Google Chrome OS: Desktop Linux's Last Chance

Filed under
OS
Google

earthweb.com: “The year of Linux” – For how many years now have we come across this headline, usually prefaced by a bygone year? It must be for at least ten years. Is there any hope that Linux can actually make significant gains and become a credible alternative to Windows and Mac OS X?

Linux- 5 steps to a wider adoption

Filed under
Linux

sinaisix.blogspot: Linux is the world's best alternative to Microsoft Windows. It has everything that Windows has always dreamed of having. However, it is a big wonder why after being around for close to 20 years, Linux still has less than 5% of the desktop market share.

Introducing Guitarix

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: Guitarix is a monaural amplifier designed for creating the distorted sounds typical of thrash, heavy metal, blues, and other rock guitar styles. In fact, Guitarix is capable of much more than distortion sounds. In this article I'll remove the software speaker grill and pull out the virtual chassis to take a closer look at the sonic possibilities of this "simple mono amplifier".

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Software: DNS Checkers, Alternatives to Adobe Software, Fake Hollywood Hacker Terminal and More

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website
    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.
  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps
    Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed.
  • Kube in Randa
    I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains. It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).
  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes
    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13. When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use. To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless. [...] In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.

FSF, GNU and FSFE

  • LibrePlanet 2018: Let's talk about Freedom. Embedded.
    The call for sessions is open now, until November 2nd, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. Pre-order a LibrePlanet 10th anniversary t-shirt when you register to attend! Do you want to discuss or teach others about a topic relevant to the free software community? You've got until Thursday, November 2nd, 2017 at 10:00 EDT (14:00 UTC) to submit your session proposals. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and everyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, CFP and registration open now
    The call for proposals is open now, until November 2, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and anyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • dot-zed extractor
  • FSFE Newsletter - September 2017

    To push our demand, the FSFE launched a new campaign last week: "Public Money Public Code". The campaign explains the benefits of releasing publicly funded Software under free licences with a short inspiring video and an open letter to sign. Furthermore, the campaign and the open letter will be used in the coming months until the European Parliament election in 2019 to highlight good and bad examples of publicly funded software development and its potential reuse.

  • Free Software Foundation Europe Leads Call For Taxpayer-Funded Software To Be Licensed For Free Re-use
    Considered objectively, it's hard to think of any good reasons why code that is paid for by the public should not be released publicly as a matter of course. The good news is that this "public money, public code" argument is precisely the approach that open access advocates have used with considerable success in the field of academic publishing, so there's hope it might gain some traction in the world of software too.

Security: WordPress 4.8.2, CCleaner 5.33, Apache Patch and Cryptocurrencies

  • WordPress 4.8.2 Security and Maintenance Release
    WordPress 4.8.2 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.
  • Attack on CCleaner Highlights the Importance of Securing Downloads and Maintaining User Trust
    Some of the most worrying kinds of attacks are ones that exploit users’ trust in the systems and softwares they use every day. Yesterday, Cisco’s Talos security team uncovered just that kind of attack in the computer cleanup software CCleaner. Download servers at Avast, the company that owns CCleaner, had been compromised to distribute malware inside CCleaner 5.33 updates for at least a month. Avast estimates that over 2 million users downloaded the affected update. Even worse, CCleaner’s popularity with journalists and human rights activists means that particularly vulnerable users are almost certainly among that number. Avast has advised CCleaner Windows users to update their software immediately. This is often called a “supply chain” attack, referring to all the steps software takes to get from its developers to its users. As more and more users get better at bread-and-butter personal security like enabling two-factor authentication and detecting phishing, malicious hackers are forced to stop targeting users and move “up” the supply chain to the companies and developers that make software. This means that developers need to get in the practice of “distrusting” their own infrastructure to ensure safer software releases with reproducible builds, allowing third parties to double-check whether released binary and source packages correspond. The goal should be to secure internal development and release infrastructure to that point that no hijacking, even from a malicious actor inside the company, can slip through unnoticed.
  • Apache bug leaks contents of server memory for all to see—Patch now
    There's a bug in the widely used Apache Web Server that causes servers to leak pieces of arbitrary memory in a way that could expose passwords or other secrets, a freelance journalist has disclosed. The vulnerability can be triggered by querying a server with what's known as an OPTIONS request. Like the better-known GET and POST requests, OPTIONS is a type of HTTP method that allows users to determine which HTTP requests are supported by the server. Normally, a server will respond with GET, POST, OPTIONS, and any other supported methods. Under certain conditions, however, responses from Apache Web Server include the data stored in computer memory. Patches are available here and here.
  • The Pirate Bay Takes Heat for Testing Monero Mining
    Cryptocurrencies usually are mined with CPU power initially, she told LinuxInsider. Users then find ways to speed up the hashing before going to GPU. They build specialized hardware and field programmable gate array (FPGA) chips to carry out the hashing function in order to mine much faster. [...] The notion that The Pirate Bay effectively would borrow resources from its own users is not the problem, suggested Jessica Groopman, principal analyst at Tractica.