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Tuesday, 31 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

BBC unveils next-generation iPlayer at FM2007

Filed under
Software

c21media.net: The next generation of the BBC's iPlayer is now live on the internet, offering not only downloading services but also live streaming, and is now available on Apple and Linux systems as well as to Microsoft users.

Also: Adobe to Open Source Messaging Protocols

Samba Domaincontroller For Small Workgroups With SWAT On Fedora 8

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up and configure a Samba Domaincontroller for small workgroups (up to 250 users) on Fedora 8 with the Samba Web Administration Tool.

Kubuntu Tutorials Day is on

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonobacon: Kubuntu fans, today (yes, today!) a demonstration of Kubuntu love is going to be happening on #kubuntu-devel on Freenode.

Turkey's Pardus distro is easy to use

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Pardus originated in Turkey, was once based on Gentoo Linux, and is packaged with KDE. It comes in two versions: a live CD and a traditional, multilanguage installer, which I used. Its full-screen interface is uncluttered, simple, and easy to navigate and decipher.

KDE Commit-Digest for 9th December 2007

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: The "simple menu" (similar to the menu found in the KDE 3 series) becomes usable. The clock receives a popup-based calendar widget, with KRunner becoming multi-threaded in Plasma.

Also: trolltech, phonon and open processes

Opera starts throwing rocks at Microsoft

Filed under
Software

daniweb.com/blogs: Opera Software ASA has filed an official complaint with the European Commission which describes at some length how, Opera claims, Microsoft is "abusing its dominant position by tying its browser, Internet Explorer, to the Windows operating system and by hindering interoperability by not following accepted Web standards."

GNOME theme engine designer adds transparency to GTK

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: GNOME theme engine designer Andrea Cimitan has implemented support for transparent widgets in the Murrine GTK theme engine, bringing Vista-like translucent glass effects to the GNOME desktop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Review: Asus Eee PC (video)

  • Is Microsoft really scared of Linux
  • Mozilla to addon developers: work on Firefox 3 compatibility
  • gddrescue: a tool for recovering data from damaged media
  • Quick Tip: Configuring Fixed Window Placement in Compiz Fusion
  • Tip from an RHCE: Memory storage on PostgreSQL
  • Quicksilver for Ubuntu
  • Wormux
  • Fedora Core 6 No More
  • Why Sourceforge lost its mojo
  • Are We There Yet? Making the Change to Open Source
  • When "freedom" rhymes with "insanity"

Stuffing it up - ODF and OOXML Document Format Battle

Filed under
OSS

fanaticattack.com: Industry Motive: To preserve a monopoly and the fight to protect a four-billion-dollar per year cash cow against those who stand for open standards, against those who want to create even playing fields, fair competition, innovation and open access for everyone to benefit.

The Big Three of Linux - a 52-week view

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techtarget.com: What are Red Hat, Novell, and Canonical going to have to do in the next 52 weeks to in order to dominate the desktop and server Linux market? Let’s take a moment and assess the situation.

The World Series of Linux: Round 1

Filed under
Linux

crn.com: Welcome to the inaugural edition of CMP Channel's The World Series of Linux. As there are more than 176 Linux distributions, Test Center engineers selected the most popular distributions, Debian-based and RPM-based, for the World Series. Playing in the Debian League was Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon, Freespire (the free version of Linspire), and Xandros Professional Edition.

Kubuntu + KDE 4.0 RC2 Screenshots

Filed under
KDE

phoronix: KDE 4.0 Release Candidate 2 was made available yesterday as the last testing release before the final KDE 4.0 build next month. Two LiveCDs are the OpenSuSE-based KDE Four Live 0.8 and a KDE 4.0 spin of Kubuntu.

OpenOffice on Ulteo in Pictures

Filed under
OOo

blogs.eweek.com: Today my colleague Steven J. Vaughn Nichols is reporting on Mandriva founder Gael Duval's Ulteo, which now offers online access to the OpenOffice.org productivity suite. I'm an OpenOffice.org user and overall fan of software as a service--particularly when it's a free service--so I thought I'd take Ulteo for a spin.

The Kite Runner Inspires Gift Through One Laptop

Filed under
OLPC

Press Release: Masi Oka, star of NBC's hit ensemble series "Heroes" and global ambassador for OLPC said, "This generous donation through One Laptop per Child is a great example of the diverse organizations participating in our giving campaign to provide educational assistance to communities in need throughout the developing world."

Thoughts on Package Management: The Change in Distro-Land

Filed under
Software

linux-blog.org: What if you could combine SVN/CVS behavior and packages? What if when you build the package properly, it is checked into the software development tree. You’d be eliminating an entire step in the process. Sound too good to be true? It’s not. It’s Conary.

Linux Won't Take The Desktop Away From Microsoft Anytime Soon

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: I'm always amused when advocates for a certain technology proclaim a dominate player like Microsoft is soon to be replaced. Steven Vaughan-Nichols made such a proclamation about Linux taking over low cost PCs on www.linuxdesktop.com.

more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing gOS on Ubuntu

  • Simple File Encryption with OpenSSL
  • Configure Linux
  • APT-Get vs Aptitude - Command Line Reference Guide
  • OpenOffice.org Calc: Basic arithmetic and statistic functions

Movable Type Open Source

Filed under
Software

movabletype.org: As of today, and forever forward, Movable Type is open source. This means you can freely modify, redistribute, and use Movable Type for any purpose you choose.

2.6.24-rc5, No Final Before Xmas

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "It's been a week, and I promised to be a good boy and try to follow my release rules, so here is the next -rc," Linus Torvalds said, announcing the 2.6.24-rc5 kernel. He noted, "Things _have_ slowed down, although I'd obviously be lying if I said we've got all the regressions handled and under control."

Nina Reiser's Best Friend Was Panicking: 'I Did Not Know Where Nina Was'

Filed under
Reiser

wired blog: Nina Reiser's best friend took the witness stand here Wednesday at Hans Reiser's murder trial, reliving for jurors her emotional disarray following her friend's disappearance last year. "I was panicking. I did not know where Nina was."

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Linux Devices

Leftovers: OSS

  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center
    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.
  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.
  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)
    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.
  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out
    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas. The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.
  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub
    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.
  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets
    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.
  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack
    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre. According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.
  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]
    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.
  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal
    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.
  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation
    Open standards The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.” The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.

Licensing and Coding

  • The Oracle v. Google Suit is Still an Anti-Open Move That Shouldn't Have Happened
    All the way back in 2010, when Oracle filed a complaint for patent and copyright infringement against Google regarding parts of the Java code found in Google's Android mobile OS, I wrote a post calling the move "the anti-open move of the year." Fast-forward to today, and in the Oracle v. Google trial that just concluded, a jury returned a verdict in Google's favor. It basically concluded that Oracle's suit against Google, claiming that the use of Java APIs in Android violated copyright law, was bunk. Now, in an op-ed piece for Ars Technica, Annette Hurst, an attorney who represented Oracle, equates the jury's decision with the death of open source. [...] Hurst makes a good point that dual licensing models are increasing, with many open source projects available for free, while commercial versions, often including support, come at a cost. But the Oracle suit originated because Oracle essentially perceived itself as owning a moat around Java that didn't really exist. [...] Indeed, one of the lasting images of this long running legal skirmish is going to be Oracle behaving in a decidedly anti-open fashion. It may have been wiser for Oracle to simply let this one go.
  • Here’s how to check if software license is open source
    The Open Source Initiative (OSI), the steward of the Open Source Definition (OSD), announced today it has created a machine readable publication of OSI approved licenses. According to the Initiative, the API will allow third parties to ‘become license-aware’, giving businesses everywhere means to determine if a license is Open Source or not.
  • 3 Things Infrastructure as Code is Not
    The role of the network engineer is changing. This is not a result of DevOps, although some would claim it is. As DevOps takes center stage in organizations, it can seem like network engineers are being asked to become developers. There have been a number of talks discussing this, some of which have surfaced at Interop Las Vegas. The shift has been Infrastructure as Code (IaC), which was fundamental to the start of the DevOps movement. So maybe you could say this is caused by DevOps.
  • Introducing Blue Ocean: a new user experience for Jenkins
    While this project is in the alpha stage of development, the intent is that Jenkins users can install Blue Ocean side-by-side with the Jenkins Classic UI via a plugin. Not all the features listed on this blog are complete but we will be hard at work over the next few months preparing Blue Ocean for general use. We intend to provide regular updates on this blog as progress is made. Blue Ocean is open source today and we invite you to give us feedback and to contribute to the project.