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Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Elonex One Sighted

Filed under
Hardware

opendotdotdot.blogspot: So now there's a Web site with some details. Also worth taking a look at is this BBC video.

Nexuiz 2.4 Offers Impressive Graphics

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Since the release of Nexuiz 1.0 in 2005, we have been tracking its progress as one of the leading open-source first person shooters. With time, this fast-pace game has picked up a nice level of artificial intelligence for its in-game bots, engine optimizations, single-player campaign missions, and a variety of technical advancements.

Take Two Package Managers In to the Shower?

Filed under
Software

hotcoffeeandlinux.blogspot: Installing software on Linux for new users has got to be one of the stumbling blocks to people switching from a Microsoft based OS. So whats the solution? thankfully there is a project to address this situation its called Autopackage.

Xrandr GUI

Filed under
Software

bryceharrington.org: Finally today we've uploaded the new Xrandr GUI to Ubuntu Hardy. I mentioned working on a tool a couple weeks ago; I discovered that Soren Sandmann was also working on such a tool and was further along, so I shifted focus to getting that tool ready for integration in Ubuntu.

GIMP 2.4.5 Released

Filed under
GIMP

gimp.org: The source for GIMP 2.4.5 is now available from ftp.gimp.org. This is a bug-fix release in the stable 2.4 series.

Mac vs. PC vs. Windows vs. Linux vs. Huh?

Filed under
OS

jtgraphic.net: Alright. I’ve finally decided to break down the pros and cons of Macs, PCs, Linux, Windows, etc. Each one has advantages and disadvantages. There are also some interesting dynamics to some of the rivalries that some people just don’t think about.

What business can learn from the open source movement

Filed under
OSS

thoughtleader.co.za: The open source movement, which is responsible for some of the most important innovations in IT such as the world wide web, Linux and Apache, neither pays fat bonuses nor offers flashy facilities. It does, however, provide much by the way of intangible benefits.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • LAC2008 is booted!

  • End Software Patents project comes out swinging
  • Alien Arena 2008 to be released March 1st
  • People of openSUSE: Marcus Rueckert
  • Shuttleworth Foundation puts money into telecoms
  • Enterprise Unix Roundup: Unix Heads for the Clouds
  • Bureaucracy swamps ISO meeting on Microsoft format
  • The impact of licensing choice
  • Open Letter For Open Drivers To NVIDIA
  • Being cutting edge while playing it safe: OpenSUSE Factory LiveCDs
  • Zmanda Recovery Manager 2.1
  • My Kiowa Linux Beta 3 Desktop
  • kernel-alert: When you absolutely, positively have to know when that next kernel version is released
  • Faster Performance, Fewer Machines For FreeBSD?
  • Do open source developers deserve a premium?
  • Sony Exec: “We’re toast if EEE PC makes it big”

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Loading custom compiled ALSA modules

  • Publishing a Blog in Vim with Vimpress
  • Improved Guide To Burning Dreamcast Discs From Linux
  • scponly - limited shell for secure file transfers
  • Mount remote folders via SSH
  • USB BackTrack Linux installation

Linux thriving in an anti-Windows Vista market

Filed under
Linux

tech.blorge.com: An anti-market has grown up around Windows Vista that was made possible by largely by its haphazard design and high price tag. But that works well for Linux, which is enjoying some strong sales growth at Novell.

Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron Alpha 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

distro-review.com: It's getting to the point where I should just rename "April" and "October" on my calandar "Ubuntu!" because that's what it just boils down to. If you have any interest in the state of open source software then you'll know that Ubuntu tends to be the benchmark.

When geeks and graffiti combine

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom.com: There is a lot of geeky graffiti out there. Some are just scribbles on a wall (programmer art being as it is), and some definitely qualify as artwork.

Refocusing LinuxWorld

LinuxToday: It may seem a bit weird to start a discussion about the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo (LWCE) so early in the year, but the topic came up because a friend of mine in the "biz" IM'ed me yesterday and asked if I was going to attend the Open Source Business Conference (OSBC). To me, the OSBC epitomizes what LWCE would be like without the developers and user community in attendance.

Graphics and Free Software: a great 2007, but where is OpenGL?

Filed under
Software

liquidat.wordpress: 2007 was probably The Year Of Free Graphics: AMD/ATI’s specs, a new totally Mesa , output hotplugging via XRandR and the announcement of new shiny OpenGL specs. While this all was truly great, the OpenGL releases never happened, and there are no updates on the topic.

URPMI + RPM5 = True

Filed under
MDV

Per Øyvind Karlsen: I've just finished porting urpmi (and rpmtools) to rpm 5.0, making it the first dependency solver supporting rpm 5.0! There seems to be less regressions with rpm5 currently, this was surprising considering it being a quite recent major release.

Getting Excited About KDE4

Filed under
KDE

linuxappfinder.com: A year ago I was really excited about KDE4, but the lack of some basic features I found whenever I tried a release candidate soured me a bit. I still loved the vision. When the February update showed up in Kubuntu I decided to give it another go. Now I'm happy that I did.

Fight The Power: Greening Your Linux Systems

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: Linux has a lot of advantages as a desktop operating system. Power management, unfortunately, still is not one of them. But there are plenty of ways to make a Linux system less power-hungry -- and some of the most effective fixes are also some of the easiest.

Cool Desktop Linux Applications (Part 1): Internet and networking applications

Filed under
Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: Desktop Linux has seen tremendous growth over the past few years and with this there has also been tremendous growth in number of applications relevant for desktop use available. Now most of the Linux distributions because of either space constraint or well because of licensing issue do not include many really cool applications.

End of life for Debian 3.1

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: One year after the release of Debian GNU/Linux 4.0, codenamed ‘etch’, and nearly three years after the release of Debian GNU/Linux 3.1, security support for Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 will cease at the end of March.

Extending Ubuntu's Battery Life

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: Last week when traveling to Europe for FOSDEM and other business meetings, I had picked up a new 9-cell battery for a Lenovo ThinkPad T60. While an additional three battery cells will noticeably extend your battery life, you can also extend your battery life by taking a few simple steps.

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