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Tuesday, 26 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Oracle Goes After Cisco UCS, with the 'Whole Megillah' Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 10:44am
Story Zenwalk and Chakra Reviews, Another 32-Bit Voice Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 10:38am
Blog entry PostInstallerF Prepares Post Install In Ubuntu And Fedora Mohd Sohail 24/01/2015 - 10:30am
Story PostInstallerF Prepares Post Install In Ubuntu And Fedora Mohd Sohail 24/01/2015 - 4:24am
Story DragonFlyBSD 4.0.3 Released Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 2:27am
Story Open-Xchange Partners with ExtendASP on Open Source SaaS Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 2:20am
Story Zenwalk Linux - A Walk on the Quirky Side Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 2:10am
Story Linux-enabled sit/stand smart desk nudges you into action Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 1:35am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 12:43am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 12:43am

5 Great opensource games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

unixmen.com: Here are 5 Nice opensource games for Linux , I installed the games on ubuntu and they did work fine, I liked more Supertux perhaps because is similar to super mario bros one my favorite games, the rest of the games are nice ones also with nice music and good graphics.

The File Menu

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: The File menu has been around since the dawn of user interfaces. But do you know what? It has overstayed its welcome. The File menu has been abused in far too many applications.

Windows And Linux Users Get Another Great VM Option

Filed under
Software

bmighty.com/blog: Parallels, Inc. is a company best known for its Mac-based virtualization software. This week, however, it finally delivered an updated version of its Windows- and Linux-based products.

4 Resources for the Powerful Inkscape Open Source Drawing Tool

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Among advanced open source graphics tools, GIMP has a lot of fans, and there are many free online resources available for it, but if you're looking for a drawing and illustration tool that can compete with Adobe Illustrator and is especially good for logos and splashy still graphics, give Inkscape a try.

Kindle DX Impressions

jonobacon.org: The Kindle. I have been wanting to buy one of these babies for a while, and when I kept reading about people buying my book on them, read Mike’s generally positive blatherings, and wanted something to read for my honeymoon last week, I gave in and bought one.

The 'Linuxification' of Windows has begun

Filed under
Linux
Software

Randall C. Kennedy, InfoWorld: It's like a cancer: a creeping, deadly disease that slowly erodes all that's good and clean, replacing it with a swill of malignancy and decrepitude. I'm speaking, of course, of the recent appearance of Linux UI conventions under Windows.

Fedora from an Ubuntu point of view

Filed under
Linux

blog.lynxworks.eu: In the interests of not becoming blinkered to one distribution, I thought I might give Fedora 11 a whirl. Not having used Fedora since FC4, I was surprised to see the adoption of a live CD installation and relieved to avoid a DVD size download. Just like Ubuntu it’s well polished, perhaps more so with graphical grub.

Grants, bounties and free software

Filed under
OSS

stormyscorner.com: The GNOME community has had mixed results with bounties and grants, so when Funambol community manager Stefano Maffulli contacted me about a GNOME grant and said they'd had success using grants for Funambol, I thought it'd be interesting to learn more about the program.

Building Linux Audio Apps 101: A User's Guide, Part 1

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linuxjournal.com: Recently I've received some mail asking for a brief explanation on how to build Linux audio applications from source code packages. Ask and ye shall receive, hence the following simple guide for the perplexed, the puzzled, and the downright mystified. Compiling software is hardly rocket science, and if an old guitar-picker like myself can do it certainly you can too.

Ubuntu Netbook Remix UI Gets Tweaked Again

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntumini.com: Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala Alpha 4 brings another Ubuntu Netbook Remix user interface redesign. The colors has been lighted, the menus now dynamically resize to allow more of the background to be seen and launcher animations have returned.

KDE 4.3.1 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: A month has passed since the release of KDE 4.3.0, so today the KDE Community announces the immediate availability of KDE 4.3.1, a bugfix, translation and maintenance update for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop.

Linux powers world's fastest stock exchange

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: The Deutsche Borse Group manages the International Securities Exchange, an equity options exchange, in New York and the Eurex and Deutsche Borse's own Xetra cash exchange. The Xetra stock exchange platform is also used by the Irish Stock Exchange, the European Energy Exchange, and the Shanghai Stock Exchange among others. It's long used Linux as the basis of these high-speed stock exchanges.

Shooter's gallery: the 10 most influential FPS games

Filed under
Gaming

telegraph.co.uk: Although it was preceded by id Software's Catacomb 3D, Wolfenstein 3D is widely recognised as the father of the first-person-shooter game and the title which spawned one of the most popular genres in the gaming industry.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.31 - Part 5: CUSE, USB 3.0, FireWire networking and the rest

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Linux 2.6.31 will support USB 3.0, although the corresponding hardware is not yet available. Distributions are to use the new FireWire stack that now offers LAN support. CUSE emulates the Open Sound System via a userspace program.

First look: Opera 10 faster with new features

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Opera 10 has arrived and finds itself needing to stand out in an increasingly crowded browser market. Ars goes hands on with the new release to see if Opera 10 has what it takes.

Also: Should Opera dump its desktop browser?

How To Install GRUB 2 On Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can upgrade your GRUB bootloader to GRUB 2 on Ubuntu 9.04. GRUB 2 has been rewritten from scratch to clean up everything for modularity and portability.

IE tumbles, Firefox regains market share mojo

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Last month, Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer posted its largest market share loss since November 2008, while Firefox reaped nearly all the benefit, Web metrics company Net Applications said today.

Ten Things You Didn't Know Apache (2.2) Could Do

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: Apache 2.2 has been out for a while, and just recently, 2.2.13 was released. However, it also seems that a lot of folks are completely unaware of some of the cool new things available in 2.2.

Linux is losing its stable title

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Linux has a reputation for stability. Because it is based on the Unix framework it has an inbuilt stability where if one process crashes, other processes are not effected. Pure Linux is still supremely stable. Then along came Jones.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.

Red Hat: ‘Hybrid Cloud’, University of Alabama, Red Hat Upgrades Ansible and Expectations