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Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Debian Project News - December 2nd

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's 16th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include: Etch-and-a-half installation images updated, GNU Affero General Public License suitable for Debian main, and Security Teams Meeting in Essen.

You're Never Too Old For Linux

Filed under
Linux

oneclicklinux.com: November 30th was a milestone birthday for me! I hit the big Five-OH! Fifty! This 50th birthday made me realize that you're never too old to learn something new.

Bugzilla 3.2 has shiny NASA interface enhancements

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Mozilla has announced the official release of Bugzilla 3.2, a significant new version that adds a large number of major improvements.

Just what does it take to switch to desktop Linux (part 2)?

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com: Plenty of folks took my challenge to sort out just what it would take to switch from Windows to desktop Linux. Here are the highlights from the talkbacks, though, with some important considerations.

Compiz? Emerald? Metacity? What's the Difference?

Filed under
Software

ubuntulinuxtipstricks.blogspot: Not for the first time, I found myself the other night explaining on IRC how the window manager and window decorator parts fit together. There seems to be a misconception that Compiz requires Emerald. That is far from true. There also seems to be confusion regarding what different kinds of themes do. So let's start at the basics.

Nitrogen: A Background Setter For Lightweight Desktop Manager

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: Gnome, KDE and XFCE users will have no problem changing the wallpaper on their desktop. However, if you are using a lightweight desktop manager such Openbox or Fluxbox, you will find that there is no way that you can set the wallpaper for your desktop. In this case, Nitrogen will come in handy.

Playing with Sugar

Filed under
Linux

tieguy.org/blog: Following Greg’s recent posts on Sugar, I’m playing with running it a bit; might even try to use it as my dominant platform for a while. Some thoughts, all written from within Sugar:

10 Myths of Free & Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

brajeshwar.com: At FOSS, the focus is more on the protection of information than the methodology used to implement it. Several codes are made and rectified in the public and it thus increases the knowledge of all the users worldwide.

Testing Fedora 10 KDE Edition

Filed under
Linux

temporaryland.wordpress: My experience with Fedora has not been bad at all. I think a big reason for that is that my laptop has practically no need for proprietary drivers. In fact, every piece of hardware, including sound, works out of the box. So, that leaves me free to compare distros by their features and ease of use.

Fedora 10: Where's the beef?

techiemoe.com: Everything present in this version can and has been done better in Ubuntu. If you haven't dipped your toes into the Debian side of the pond, this is as good a time as any.

Mandriva falls on bad days - again

Filed under
MDV

itwire.com: The global economic crisis is taking its toll on many technology companies and Mandriva has now taken a hit. Last week, the company announced that it would be terminating the services of all its external contractors, that is those who work from remote locations.

10 essential Firefox add-ons

Filed under
Moz/FF

manilastandardtoday.com: ONE of the cool things about Firefox is that you can customize the browser with third-party add-ons to make it work better for you.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Three Reasons Why All Linux Users Should Support Ubuntu

  • Smolt and openSUSE
  • Enterprise Adoption of Open Source Steams Ahead
  • The waning of pure play open source
  • Five Best CD and DVD Burning Tools
  • 2 Mindanao open source orgs receive honors
  • What to Expect From Linux as a New User
  • Open source - it's all about the value add
  • The Lawsuit Ain't Over Til the Fat Lady Sings
  • Sexism in the IT industry
  • Is the new Komodo 5 toolset worth the upgrade?
  • Another vulnerability in VLC media player
  • NHL using Drupal
  • Camp KDE 2009 Presentations Announced
  • AGPL Declared DFSG-Free
  • Unlock the Web with Open Source
  • Sherwin-Williams Standardizes Its Retail Stores on SUSE Linux Enterprise
  • Is this OpenOffice.org's Firegull Moment?
  • Unix and Linux Troubleshooting E-Book
  • X Generic Event (XGE) Protocol Specification
  • Opera 10, another great update, another cheesy name
  • Asustek Promises OLPC XO Competitor in Q1 2009
  • On Holidays, Hot Air and the 7 Horrors of Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Easy IPv6 connections with miredo

  • Mounting remote directories using FUSE and sshfs on openSUSE
  • Configuring sudo and adding users to Wheel group
  • Beginning the boot loading process in Ubuntu
  • Adding Synaptic in Linux Mint KDE
  • Keeping tabs on your network traffic
  • OOo: Using the "Format > Default Formatting" feature in presentations
  • Qemu - running fullscreen
  • How to send email from the Linux command line
  • Ubuntu tip: backing up installed packages

A Microsoft Veteran Embraces Open Source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.nytimes: Keith Curtis has just written a book about the future of software. That in itself isn’t unique. More unusual is that Mr. Curtis, an 11-year veteran of Microsoft, the world’s largest software company, believes deeply that open source is the future of software.

A perfect Ubuntu upgrade

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • A perfect Ubuntu upgrade

  • Why Ubuntu Now Beats Vista
  • Back in the Ubuntu saddle again!
  • eWEEK Labs Walk-Through: Upgrading to Ubuntu 8.10
  • Ubuntu Command Line Quickstart

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter -- 30 November 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

The November issue of the Gentoo Monthly Newsletter has been released. In this month's issue: Kernel team, Incognito, Gentoo-wiki returns, and more!

10 ways to reduce removable media headaches in Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: If you’ve shied away from Linux because of the hassle of working with removable media, you may want to take another look. Thanks to automation — and with the help of these tips — you may find that removable media is downright user friendly.

Dreamlinux 3.5: Back to the Roots

Filed under
Linux

tuxgeek.me: In today’s article we review a fresh version of Dreamlinux, a linux distribution that promises to be good-looking, lightweight yet fully featured, with useful extras available out of the box - making it an attractive package for new users.

The best Linux distributions of fall 2008

Filed under
Linux

bitburners.com: For the last year we have had the habit of summarizing the latest release cycle of Linux distributions, and let the fall of 2008 be no different. This time around the decision was easier than ever and I must say that there isn’t even serious competition to which distro shall the award go to.

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More in Tux Machines

Wine 1.8.7

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine maintenance release 1.8.7 is now available. This is the final release in the 1.8.x series.
  • Wine 1.8.7 Is the Last Update in the Series, Users Should Upgrade to Wine 2.0
    The Wine development team announced today the release of Wine 1.8.7, which appears to the last maintenance update to the Wine 1.8 stable series, adding various improvements and bug fixes for existing users. Before we dive ourselves into the changes implemented in Wine 1.8.7, you should be aware of the fact that if you're still using the Wine 1.8.x series of your GNU/Linux operating system, it is highly recommended that you prepare to upgrade to the new Wine 2.0 release (not Wine 2.1 or 2.2 because those are development releases).

Today in Techrights

OSS and Sharing/Standards Leftovers

  • Linux Announces New Open Network Automation Platform Project
    The Linux Foundation has announced the creation of the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project with the merger of Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O) and open source ECOMP. This new platform will help in designing, automating, orchestrating, and managing network services and virtual functions by creating a comprehensive and a harmonized framework that allows virtual network functions to be automated by using real-time, policy-driven software.
  • Open-Source Networking Is Coming of Age
    Service providers of all sizes and types should take note of some changes occurring across the open-source community—changes that promise to accelerate the adoption of software-defined networks (SDN). The first is a decision by AT&T to open source the ECOMP management and orchestration (MANO) framework it developed via the Linux Foundation. Through a variety of working groups, the foundation has been accelerating the development of core network function virtualization (NFV) software and associated SDN technologies. But a big piece missing from that equation has been the management plane.
  • CAVO Continues to Advance Open Source for Democracy [Ed: Remember what Microsoft did there]
    OSI Affiliate Member, the California Association of Voting Officials (CAVO), has shared some exciting news regarding their advocacy work in San Francisco: according to the San Francisco Examiner, the city of San Francisco is pushing forward with plans to develop their open source election system. In addition, the paper is reporting that the San Francisco Elections Commission voted unanimously on Feb 17th to request $4 million to fund the initial stages of the open source voting system. For many years board members of CAVO have been urging San Francisco to expedite, "the creation and deployment of a GPL v3 open source / paper ballot printing system that would set the standard for voting systems nationally." According to CAVO, currently only New Hampshire has deployed a voting system using open source software, Prime III.
  • Mozilla Acquires Pocket, Will Open Source Pocket Code
    Chances are you've heard the new: Mozilla has acquired Pocket, the go-to 'read it later' service, and says it plans to open-source Pocket code in due course.
  • The Speed Of LLVM's LLD Linker Continues Looking Good
    LLVM's LLD linker still isn't too widely used yet on Linux systems, but the performance of this linker alternative to GNU Gold and GNU ld are quite compelling. We've written many times before about the much progress and better performance of "the LLVM linker" while some new numbers were committed to the LLD documentation.
  • Welcome to Code.mil - an experiment in open source at the Department of Defense!
  • DoD Announces the Launch of “Code.mil,” an Experiment in Open Source
    The Department of Defense (DoD) announced the launch of Code.mil, an open source initiative that allows software developers around the world to collaborate on unclassified code written by federal employees in support of DoD projects.
  • An Introduction to Open Data Kit

Leftovers: Software

  • Linux Command Line Browser To Surf Internet
    Links is an open source text and graphical web browser with a pull-down menu system. It renders complex pages, has partial HTML 4.0 support (including tables and frames and support for multiple characters sets such as UTF-8), supports color and monochrome terminals and allows horizontal scrolling. It’s very useful for low resources computers because day by day the web pages are bigger and heavier. If your computer doesn’t have a suitable performance you’ll have some mistakes while you’re surfing. So, Links is much faster than any common web browser (with GUI) because it doesn’t load all the content of a website, for example, videos, flash, etc.
  • Stacer – The Linux System Optimizer You’ve Been Waiting For
    System optimizer apps are quite the thing on platforms such as Windows and Android. Their usefulness, however, is debatable considering how notorious they are when it comes to using system resources. On the Linux platform, however, we can almost always find the applications, a developer puts their time in developing to be mostly useful. Stacer is one such app created to better optimized your Linux PC in the sense that it packs quite the list of features you’d normally expect from an optimizer and more to give your system a refresh whenever you feel the need.
  • Ulauncher – A Lightweight Application Launcher for Linux
    Each Desktop environment has the own launcher and doing their job nicely but it take a while to launch the application whenever we are searching. Ulauncher is a lightweight application launcher that loads instant search results, usese low resources, and remembers your previous choices and automatically selects the best option for you. It’s written in Python and uses GTK as a GUI toolkit. When you are typing wrong application name, after few words or spelling, it will figure out what you meant. Use Ulauncher to open your files and directories faster with fuzzy search. Type ~ or / to start browsing. Press Alt+Enter to access the alt menu.