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Friday, 20 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Redesigning the Linux video system from the ground up Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 12:42pm
Story Startup OpenLegacy Open Sources App Modernization Tool Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 12:39pm
Story What Every Company Can Learn From Xiaomi Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 12:35pm
Story CuBox-i review – an elegant mini PC which runs Android, Linux and OpenELEC Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 12:30pm
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 11:23am
Story A Prediction: 2020 the year of (PC-)BSD on the desktop Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 11:21am
Story Netrunner 15 – Prometheus (64bit) Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 11:15am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 11:10am
Story Sony SmartWatch 3 Review: The Best-Performing Android Smartwatch Yet Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 2:13am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 12:21am

Why Open Source is not Magic Pixie Dust, Part 284

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: One of the pivotal moments in the rise of free software was 22 January 1998, when the following statement appeared:

Network Monitoring Appliance

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

My ambition was to implement a small (better tiny) appliance for monitoring network health and network resources, short and longtime trends, running under VMware Server or VMware ESX. So I had an eye upon all components which are implemented on the system, to be as leightweight as possible.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mac OSX-like theme for your GNOME desktop
  • Ten Of The Best GNOME Themes
  • 10 Days of Ubuntu 10.10 Feature Requests Day 8, Day 7
  • GDM Updated In Karmic Alpha 6
  • Mozilla VP: Chrome Frame is the wrong answer
  • Open-Source Software: An All-Star Lineup
  • Ohio Linuxfest 2009 Review
  • What does advertising say about open source?
  • List of features of OpenOffice.org 3.2
  • 25 years of GNU - support software freedom
  • Plymouth Gets A DRM Renderer Plug-In
  • Dropbox hits two million Windows, Mac and Linux users
  • multiple inheritance - why still using it
  • The Myth of Crowdsourcing
  • HP "Entertainment PC" Revisited
  • Open Source and Open Standards at Home
  • Moblin Brings Btrfs into View, Eschews Ext4
  • IDC: Organisations adopt open source to reduce expenses
  • Congrats Fabio!
  • Karmic Beta Testing
  • Kubuntu Beta Candidate Testing Needed
  • Is open source software finding a home in Whitehall?
  • Q&A With A Post-Microsoft Sam Ramji

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Evolution backup
  • Recovering a broken Linux Operating System part (1/3)
  • Customize The Gnome Panel Clock To Match Karmic's New Icons
  • How to Create Your Own USB Linux Distro with LiLi
  • Advanced Tips for Search-and-Replace in Linux
  • Livestation- Watch hundreds of TV channels for Free on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Server: "Setting locale failed" and a fix
  • Criterion, a new benchmarking library for Haskell
  • gummi – Simple LaTeX editor written in Python/GTK
  • Customized Bash Prompts with the PS1 Variable

Forget Candy, Buy Open Source Software for Charity

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: Instead of hauling around boxes of candy bars or gift wrap the next time your school or non-profit group needs to raise money, why not offer a CD of open source software in exchange for a donation?

On Mono, Miguel, Stallman and Fusion with Microsoft

Filed under
Software

groklaw.net: Jason Perlow has written an article about Richard Stallman, Watch Out for That Meteor, Stallman. There are some factual errors in the article, so let me step up to the plate and fix them.

Understanding the Linux File System

Filed under
Linux

bihlman.com: The way Linux organizes its files on the hard drive is vastly different from how Windows handles this task. New Linux users coming from Windows sometime have a hard time maneuvering though directories or come with notions that Linux should manage its files in the same vain as Windows.

An interview with Patryk Rządziński, head of IT at OSTC Poland

Filed under
Gentoo
Interviews

gentoo.org: Global Financial Derivative trading company, OSTC Poland, uses Gentoo Linux in significant sectors of its IT infrastructure. We spoke with long time Gentoo user and head of OSTC Poland's IT department, Patryk Rzadzinski, to learn more.

Mark Shuttleworth's Community Has No Women

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxtoday.com/blog: I watched it. I kept score. Everyone keeps saying what a nice guy Mark is. Well, maybe so, but even nice guys have their blind spots. I don't believe that nice guys belittle and exclude women, and that is what happened in this keynote.

OSMO: Your friendly personal organizer

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: Although integration has become widespread, there are instances when you might want a separate tool for organizing your life. What if you want something on your machine to organize your life – that doesn’t require an online connection, is simple to use, and has a tiny footprint. If that’s you, OSMO is the tool you’ve been looking for.

Lighthouse SQ7 & NetWalker PC-Z1

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Linux Is Bloated. Does Anyone Care?

Filed under
Linux

serverwatch.com: As Linux grows up, it gains new features — and that's driven by what Linux users want. It's a bit like all those muffin-topped shoppers: They inevitably get fat, because they want fattening food.

40 years of Unix

Filed under
OS
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: 1969, the summer of love for most, was the summer of not having enough computer resources for AT&T Bell Lab employees Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie.

Red Hat to collide with Microsoft

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

news.cnet.com: For years, Red Hat has happily sold Linux to Unix shops anxious to save money at equivalent or better performance. During this time, the company largely avoided Microsoft, which has tended to compete much higher up the stack. No longer.

Use SUSE Studio to Build a Linux OS From Scratch

Filed under
SUSE

lifehacker.com: Think you can make a better fast-booting, Chrome-focused OS than Google? Want to craft a custom Linux system that boots from a USB stick? SUSE Studio gives you 15 GB to do exactly that, and you do it all online.

Ubuntu – good enough for grannies and girlfriends

Filed under
Ubuntu

shaneosullivan.wordpress: I recently installed Ubuntu Linux 9.04 on my girlfriends lovely new EEE Netbook), but left the original Windows install intact, because, well, I’ve always had a need to go back to Windows for 30 minutes at some point for some reason or another.

Why distributions shouldn’t ship development versions

Filed under
Linux

martin-graesslin.com/blog: At Desktop Summit Lubos asked me what openSUSE has to do that I will switch back to SUSE. I replied that I am satisfied with Kubuntu and so I don’t see any need to switch the distribution. So what has changed since July?

One For All and All For One: A Single Linux Distribution

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: The only problem I see with it is, which one are you gonna choose for THE distribution? Will it be SUSE, Debian, Red Hat, Gentoo, or Slackware? Since it has to be a top-level distribution and not a derivative, it will have to be one of those. Let's examine those choices.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Events: Akademy 2017 and KDE Edu Sprint

  • Hey Mycroft, Drive Me to our Goals!
    Almost three months after Akademy 2017, I finally found the time to write a blog post about how I experienced it. Akademy is where I learn again about all the amazing things happening in our community, where I connect the dots and see the big picture of where all the effort in the various projects together can lead. And of course, I meet all the wonderful people, all the individual reasons why being in KDE is so amazing. This year was no different. Some people voiced their concern during the event that those who are not at Akademy and see only pictures of it on social media might get the feeling that it is mostly about hanging out on the beach and drinking beer, instead of actually being productive. Everyone who was ever at Akademy of course knows this impression couldn’t be further from the truth, but I’ll still take it as a reason to not talk about any of the things that were “just” fun, and focus instead on those that were both fun and productive.
  •  
  • KDE Edu sprint 2017 in Berlin
    I had the privilege to attend the KDE Edu sprint in Berlin that happened from the 6th to the 9th of October.

Software: Narabu, ucaresystem, Telegram Messenger

  • Introducing Narabu, part 2: Meet the GPU
    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec. You may or may not want to read part 1 first. The GPU, despite being extremely more flexible than it was fifteen years ago, is still a very different beast from your CPU, and not all problems map well to it performance-wise. Thus, before designing a codec, it's useful to know what our platform looks like.
  • ucaresystem Core v4.0 : Added option to upgrade Ubuntu to the next release
    Since Ubuntu 17.10 has just been released, I have added new feature to the ucaresystem Core that can be used by the user to upgrade his distribution to the next stable version or optionally to the next development version of Ubuntu. For those who are not familiar with the ucaresystem app it is an automation script that automatically and without asking for your intervention performs some crucial Ubuntu maintenance processes, which otherwise would be done one by one and pressing Y / N each time.
  • 10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger
    Whatsapp may be the best player in the game when it comes to instant messaging apps, but Telegram Messenger is the entire game itself. Because Telegram is not just an app, it is an entire communication platform. It is not bound by restrictions or limitations like other apps.

Graphics and Games: RandR and AMDGPU, Opus Magnum

  • "NonDesktop" Proposed For RandR: Useful For VR & Apple Touch Bar Like Devices
    Besides Keith Packard working on the concept of resource leasing for the X.Org Server and resource leasing support for RandR, he's also now proposing a "NonDesktop" property for the Resize and Rotate protocol. The resource leasing has already been worked out as a candidate for the next update, RandR 1.6, while now this veteran X11 developer is proposing a new "NonDesktop" property for identifying outputs that are not conventional displays.
  • More AMDGPU Changes Queue For Linux 4.15
    Adding to the excitement of Linux 4.15, AMD has queued some more changes that were sent in today for DRM-Next. Already for Linux 4.15, the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver should have the long-awaited "DC" display stack that brings Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting and more. Other pull requests have also brought in a new ioctl, UVD video encode ring support on Polaris, transparent huge-pages DMA support, PowerPlay clean-ups, and many fixes, among other low-level improvements.
  • Opus Magnum, the latest puzzle game from Zachtronics, is released into Early Access
    The developers behind the challenging puzzle games TIS-100 and SHENZEN I/O are at it again and have released their latest title into Steam’s Early Access today.
  • Open your wallets, there's some great Linux games on sale right now
    It's time to throw your wallet at your screen, as we're going to take a look at some awesome Linux games on sale.

System 76 and Purism Laptops

  • POP!_OS is a developer-focused minimalist Linux distro from System 76
    There aren’t that many Linux hardware manufacturers around. Of the few that exist, System 76 is amongst the most well-known. It offers a slew of laptops and desktops, all shipping with the popular Ubuntu distro pre-installed, saving customers hours of wasted time dealing with driver hell. But it recently announced it’s changing gears and creating its own Linux distro, which will replace Ubuntu on its systems, called POP!_OS.
  • Purism’s Linux laptops now ship with Intel Management Engine disabled
    Most computers that ship with recent Intel processors include something called Intel Management Engine, which enables hardware-based security, power management, and remote configuration features that are not tied to the operating system running on your PC. For free software proponents, this has been a pain in the behind, because it’s a closed-source, proprietary feature designed to provide remote access to a computer even when it’s turned off. While it’s designed to provide security, it also poses a potential security and privacy threat, since it’s a proprietary system that can only be patched by Intel
  • Purism Now Shipping Their Laptops With Intel ME Disabled
    Purism has announced today all laptops to be shipping from their company will now have the Intel Management Engine (ME) disabled. Thanks to work done by security researches in recent years for finding ways to disable ME, especially in light of recent security vulnerabilities, Purism's Coreboot-equipped laptops are now shipping with ME disabled out-of-the-box. Those already with a Librem laptop are able to apply a firmware update to also disable it.