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Saturday, 22 Jul 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Wolvix Linux 2.0 Beta 2 Review

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: This week I decided to take a look at a lesser known distribution called Wolvix Linux. Wolvix is based on Slackware and, according to the Wolvix site, is geared toward the home user. But how well does it really work for home users?

6 best orthodox file managers for Linux

Filed under
Software

techradar.com: Depending on when you got started with computers, you've probably used an orthodox file manager. Go back to basics with these old-school file managers.

China's Censorware: What about GNU/Linux?

Filed under
Linux

opendotdotdot.blogspot: News is breaking that the Chinese government will insist on censorware being shipped with all PCs:

ubuntu 9.04 review

Filed under
Ubuntu

sathyaphoenix.wordpress: Ever since jaunty released, I had cleared made up my mind not to try it out. I thought 6 months was too little time to spend with intrepid. But yesterday night, I installed jaunty.

Test-driving Chrome for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: With an alpha version of Google’s Chrome web browser recently released, I’ve been using it on Ubuntu for a few days. Below are some thoughts on the new browser and its ability to improve the Ubuntu experience.

Why Windows is not yet ready for the Desktop

Filed under
Microsoft

climbing-the-hill.blogspot: I don't spend my time telling other people which OS should or shouldn't suit their way of working. But it seems there are people who do. And it is thus that I find myself moved enough to mock their contribution to the state of public discourse.

Squeezing Lenny didn't make a lemon.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: As you probably realised from my previous posts I like to put my Linux installations through their paces. In fact I am positively brutal with them. So I decided to do a distribution upgrade from Lenny.

No penguins in Akihibara

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: Today in Tokyo, I set myself the task of finding Linux in the Akihibara, which advertises itself to the world as Tokyo’s electronic wonderland.

few odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Open Source Network Diagramming..

  • Linux Market Share Passes 2%
  • The Linux Action Show! Season 10 Episode 6
  • Doing the geek thing with Linux
  • Podcast 56 Gentoo Developer Joshua Jackson

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing 64bit Flash Player in Ubuntu Linux

  • Reclaim Linux Disk Space by Reducing Reserved Blocks
  • How to build a highly available file server using OpenSolaris
  • Subclassing a list in Python
  • NetBackup Backup Report Script

OpenSolaris 2009.06: Getting Better All The Time

Filed under
OS

blogs.zdnet.com: The June 2009 (2009.06) release of OpenSolaris provides a solid Open Source GNOME desktop experience like that of a modern Linux distribution combined with the scalability and stability of UNIX.

AbiWord 2.7.3 Released

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Software

uwog.net: We just released AbiWord 2.7.3. The most visible addition to this release is the return of our Maemo support.

Install it forward

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

practicalswitchtoubuntu.blogspot: I am reminded by the movie "Pay it forward" where a person started doing good to three other persons and the way of gratitude is to pay it forward, doing good to three other persons thus multiplying the goodness around.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #145

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #145 for the week June 1st - June 7th, 2009 is available.

On the menu - Console Apps

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I have mentioned a couple times that I have been running without X for quite a while, on my main system. Here’s what’s running on it.

Fedora teams’ call to action.

Filed under
Linux

marilyn.frields.org: The Fedora Project has always been aimed at encouraging participation. Free/libre and open source software continues its forward momentum and increasing pace through the growth of community and contribution.

Creative Commons, We Have a Problem

opendotdotdot.blogspot: I'm a big fan of the Creative Commons movement. But it has a big problem: few people have heard of it.

FOSS can work in the Free Market

Filed under
OSS

doctormo.wordpress: This is in response to LeafStorm’s excelent post about the market economics of software and FOSS caleed FOSS and the Free Market.

Get your Google Chrome on in Linux

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: Now I have to admit I assumed I would get it installed only to have it seg fault left and right (or worse, not even start up). I, however, was very pleasantly surprised.

Code Talks

Filed under
OSS

stefanoforenza.com: Some days ago I stumbled Why Free Software has poor usability. Disagreeing on about everything written in there, I decided to pull out a long reply to each one of the points made.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Red Hat and Fedora: Red Hat Academy, Lynne Chamberlain, Flatpak Apps, and Video of Fedora 26

Security: Windows 10 Bypass, Slackware OpenJDK Update and More

  • [Older] GHOSTHOOK ATTACK BYPASSES WINDOWS 10 PATCHGUARD
    A bypass of PatchGuard kernel protection in Windows 10 has been developed that brings rootkits for the latest version of the OS within reach of attackers. Since the introduction of PatchGuard and DeviceGuard, very few 64-bit Windows rootkits have been observed; Windows 10’s security, in particular its mitigations against memory-based attacks, are well regarded. Researchers at CyberArk, however, found a way around PatchGuard through a relatively new feature in Intel processors called Processor Trace (Intel PT).
  • [Slackware] OpenJDK 8 security round-up for July ’17
    Sooner than I anticipated, there is an update for OpenJDK 8. Andrew Hughes (aka GNU/Andrew) announced the release of IcedTea 3.5.0. The new icedtea framework compiles OpenJDK 8 Update 141 Build 15 (8u141_b15). This release includes the official July 2017 security fixes.
  • ROI (Not Security) the Most Immediate IoT Challenge
    According to Defining IoT Business Models, a new report from Canonical, the software company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution, device security and privacy (45 percent) falls behind quantifying the return of investment (ROI) of their IoT projects (53 percent) as an immediate challenge. Canonical drew its conclusions from a survey of 361 IoT professionals conducted by IoTNow on behalf of the company.
  • Apply the STIG to even more operating systems with ansible-hardening
    Tons of improvements made their way into the ansible-hardening role in preparation for the OpenStack Pike release next month. The role has a new name, new documentation and extra tests. The role uses the Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) produced by the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and applies the guidelines to Linux hosts using Ansible. Every control is configurable via simple Ansible variables and each control is thoroughly documented.
  • Open Source Flaw 'Devil's Ivy' Puts Millions of IoT Devices at Risk
    Millions of IoT devices are vulnerable to cybersecurity attacks due to a vulnerability initially discovered in remote security cameras, Senrio reported this week.
  • Microsoft’s secret weapon in ongoing struggle against Fancy Bear? Trademark law [Ed: Microsoft should make a start by stopping the addition of back doors to all its software]
  • SECURITY FOR THE SECURITY GODS! SANDBOXING FOR THE SANDBOXING THRONE
    Last year, probably as a distraction from doing anything else, or maybe because I was asked, I started reviewing bugs filed as a result of automated flaw discovery tools (from Coverity to UBSan via fuzzers) being run on gdk-pixbuf. Apart from the security implications of a good number of those problems, there was also the annoyance of having a busted image file bring down your file manager, your desktop, or even an app that opened a file chooser either because it was broken, or because the image loader for that format didn't check for the sanity of memory allocations.

5 open source tools for developing IoT applications

The internet of things is growing at a staggeringly fast pace, and is quickly coming to revolutionize virtually every aspect of modern life. Aspiring developers hoping to hop on board and profit off the growing phenomenon are constantly looking for the right tools to use. So what are the open source tools best suited for working with the IoT, and where can developers find them? A plethora of open source tools lay at the disposal of any would-be developer eager and wise enough to use them. By utilizing these five, you’ll find yourself tackling challenges and developing successful applications in no time. Read more Related: