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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New ​Linux Foundation's guide to the open-source cloud Rianne Schestowitz 20/01/2015 - 8:18pm
Story Using Tumbleweed, the openSuSE rolling distribution Rianne Schestowitz 20/01/2015 - 7:48pm
Story Jeff Hoogland’s Back at Bodhi Rianne Schestowitz 20/01/2015 - 7:30pm
Story Install/Upgrade Linux Kernel To 3.18.3 Stable In Ubuntu/Linux Mint/Peppermint Mohd Sohail 20/01/2015 - 4:04pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2015 - 11:24am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2015 - 11:23am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2015 - 11:23am
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2015 - 11:21am
Story Shadow Mapping in Qt3D 2.0 Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2015 - 11:02am
Story GNU Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2015 - 10:56am

All Linux needs is a good commercial

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: The scene comes up with Larry David (creator of Seinfeld and star of TVs “Curb Your Enthusiasm”) sitting at a desk in front of a laptop. He’s obviously having a bit of trouble (in the way only Larry David can have trouble). He’s getting frustrated at something. He’s growing verklempt over an issue with his laptop. He’s picking it up and shaking it saying “No, no, no, no, no!”

Top 3 Mozilla Firefox 4 Features

Filed under
Moz/FF

spreadfirefox.com: Mozilla Foundation surely do not believe in resting on their laurels. Mozilla Firefox 4 suits the idiom perfectly as it is coming up with some features we could have never imagined in a browser. So let us sneak into that world.

Linux saves the day ... again

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: What do you do when Windows will not boot and cannot repair itself from the installation CD? You fire up a Linux Live CD!

Linux User-Friendliness

Filed under
Linux

osnews.com: A reader asks: Why is Linux still not as user friendly as the two other main OSes with all the people developing for Linux? Is it because it is mainly developed by geeks? My initial feeling when reading this question was that it was kind of a throwaway, kind of a slam in disguise as a genuine question. But the more I thought about it, the more intrigued I felt.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Noteworthy Linux console fonts
  • Pidgin 2.6.1: The best Linux IM client gets better
  • Chromium popularity rising on Ubuntu, gains 64-bit support
  • New LGPL Python bindings for Qt slither into the light
  • Jolicloud Review on the HP Mini 1000
  • First look at Nokia N900
  • Mac and FreeBSD guy trying Debian
  • FLOSS Weekly 83: Web Comics
  • Test If My Graphics Card Has OpenGL Support Or Not
  • Powerful Remote Incremental Backup with rdiff-backup
  • Searching for multiple strings with grep
  • Speed Up Applications Load Time in Ubuntu - Preload
  • Increase The Maximum Sound Level in Ubuntu Linux
  • Headless X setup with Debian (Lenny)
  • Command Line Basics: Redirecting Output
  • FreeBSD: Benchmark The Disks Seek And Transfer Performance
  • small tip - How to play protected CD/DVD on Arch Linux
  • How to Control Startup Services on ubuntu

8 Minimal GTK Themes

Filed under
Software

d0od.blogspot: Below are 8 minimal GTK2 themes for your Ubuntu desktop. To install them either follow the instructions given or use the ‘Appearances’ dialog from the ‘System’ menu.

fcheck: easy-to-use file integrity checker

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: fcheck is a program that emails an alert when important files or directories change. This is useful for change control or detecting unauthorized modifications that may indicate an intrusion.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #156

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #156 for the week August 16th - August 22nd, 2009 is available.

Why do companies prefer proprietary products to GPL products?

Filed under
OSS

dmartin.org: I do understand why companies often prefer BSD and Apache products to the GPL. But what I don't understand is why companies prefer proprietary over GPL.

12 add-ons every Firefox user must have

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

techradar.com: Having so much choice can be confusing, and it's often hard to tell which add-ons are worth installing and which are best left alone. So look no further - here's our 12 essential Firefox extensions.

Noteworthy Mandriva Cooker changes (10 August – 23 August)

Filed under
MDV

artipc10.vub.ac.be: Two weeks have passed, so it’s time for a Mandriva Cooker update again. There were lots of interesting changes in Cooker during this period:

Top 3 Linux Vector Graphics Editors

Filed under
Software

osrevolution.com: Who said that Linux has nothing to do with graphics editing didn't try one of these pretty nice and, if I may say so, production ready vector graphics editors.

The Sad Linux Facts

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

mossmash.blogspot: This year marks my 10th year as a Linux user. So I guess you could call me a fan of Linux. Fan enough to be able to tell you: its not going to knock Microsoft off its dominate position in business IT.

Which Web Browser And Why?

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Software

informationweek.com: Over the past year, every major browser has undergone an equally major revision. Sometimes the revisions are reflected to the left of the decimal point, sometimes to the right, but always with big changes in functionality, performance, and under-the-hood optimizations.

World of Padman: Open-Source First-Person Shooter Game for Linux

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Reviews

World of Padman is an open-source, cartoon-style first-person shooter game available for Linux too, besides Windows and Mac. It is a wonderful standalone game based upon the Quake 3 engine.

Open-source world is his

Filed under
Linux

newsobserver.com: What did you do with your summer vacation? John McLean wrote software to help IBM automate the process of counting computers on its Research Triangle Park campus. Last summer, at Raleigh-based Red Hat, he developed software that helps control robots.

Review: Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

seopher.com: My decision to review Ubuntu 9.04 first is obvious; it has long been the poster-child for the usable Linux movement and those familiar with my previous work will know that I only care about usability. I don't care how advanced the architecture is, or that distro-x supports up to 32 cores. I care about ease of use and how painless it is to get a fresh ready for everyday use.

Apple and Linux share the same design philosophy

Filed under
Linux
Mac

jaanuskase.com: I know. It sounds crazy. But hear me out. They are antithetical not because of the philosophy, but simply because the nature of the products that they make. Linux makes “backend” stuff, while Apple makes “user-facing”/”frontend” stuff. So, they do not compete. And their philosophy is similar.

7 reasons I choose Linux over Windows 7

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

abhishekrane.com: Windows 7 is all set to release on October 22nd 2009. This latest installation in the Windows series from the Redmond giant is touted as their best so far. People are going crazy over Windows 7 like Microsoft has invented some kind of time travel device.I do not want to disagree with the “fact” that Windows 7 is the best Windows ever but I want to point out that Linux is a 7 hundred times better than Windows 7.

Ubuntu with 256Mb … not so smart

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: Clonezilla makes things too easy for me, really. Being able to snap between installations in a matter of minutes takes all the challenge out of the two or three hours — or two or three days, depending on the distribution — of reinstalling a system.

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LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%