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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 23 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Hidden Linux : Font Frolics

blogs.pcworld: More isn't necessarily more useful. Somehow I've ended up with around 120 fonts. This might be great if I was a graphic designer, but as I typically use no more than half-a-dozen it's actually a damn nuisance.

New LM_Sensors Coming, Brings New Features

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Jean Delvare of the LM_Sensors project has announced that a new release of this open-source system monitoring program will be coming soon.

A Mandriva user kicks around Fedora Core 10: How does it compare?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: After using a single distribution for many years, it can be hard to give something new a try. Vincent Danen puts Fedore Core 10 through its paces.

6 Free Blog Editors That You Can Use On Your Linux Desktop

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Software

makeuseof.com: While there are many Windows-based blog editors around, there are only a handful that Linux users can use on their desktop. Here are 6 blog editors that you can use on your Linux desktop.

When Will Linux Really Go Mainstream?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: Despite the Linux and Ubuntu netbook craze, I think there is a simple reason why Linux is not a mainstream solution for most users — yet. Let me explain.

My solution for Linux adoption

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently I was reading a thread about Linux game support. The thread was regarding a particular game that had a version for Linux (it wasn’t actually a port), which was quickly pulled from support. Within the thread the tried and true standardization argument came up. It’s a valid argument, and one that most people don’t realize could bit Linux in the hinder at some point.

Fast and Light AntiX 8.0 is Released

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: The antiX-team is proud to announce that antiX MEPIS 8 'Intifada' - a fast and light complete desktop and livecd based on SimplyMEPIS and Debian Testing, with a little bit of sidux,- is now available at mepis mirrors in the released/antix directories in full and base editions.

Why isn't Linux funny?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: Stop me if you've heard this one. How many Windows programmers does it take to screw in a light bulb? None. They've declared darkness a standard.

Ubuntu spawns new generations

Filed under
Ubuntu

mybroadband.co.za: In just the few years since it was released, Ubuntu Linux has inspired tens of new Linux distributions. Here we look at five of the best.

Linux layout for Windows users

Filed under
Linux

nixtutor.com: Lets face it, you are probably coming from a windows computer if you are venturing into the world of Linux. This article will help you adjust to the changes in the way the two operating systems layout their directory structure.

Windows Is Proof That People Are Too Stupid To Use Computers

Filed under
Microsoft

blog.linuxtoday.com: And too stupid or dishonest to report Microsoft Windows as the defective disaster that it is. If it were any other type of product it would have banned from every country in the world long ago. It is straight out of Bizarro World News.

SLAX Linux - Your pocket operating system - Review

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Linux

dedoimedo.com: SLAX is a small, live Linux distro, based on Slackware. It aims to be light, friendly and useful. It's meant to fit onto antique USB thumb drives and run well on old hardware. And it features the sexy KDE desktop.

What does it take to support Opensource and Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Let's walk on the support side of the software world for a moment. There is a lot of talk, postulating and plain old FUD about what support is and should be in the FOSS world. Of course, we can break the topic into separate areas of discussion.

Linux helped me with my Valentine

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Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: This is a story of a twelve year old love affair that still has no end in sight. Part of that story involves Linux and how it enabled this blossoming of saccharine emotions.

Using Dia for diagrams

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Everybody needs diagrams. Most users need to create one more often than they think. Stop wasting time with an office app, the GIMP, or a paint program: use Dia, an easy yet powerful made-for-diagrams editor.

Is Linux development goes on right direction?

Filed under
Linux

detector-pro.com: Every OS like MacOS, Linux or Windows has GUI. But under the hood, there is different story for all three of them.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • A 3D Understanding Of ATI's R600/700 Series

  • Open source desktop adoption flickers in the Philippines
  • Why Linux is a superior operating system
  • Bookworm Gives a Boost to Open-Source ePub E-Book Format
  • Navigation smartphone runs Linux
  • Zypper: Improved bash completion and practical usage
  • The open source value of responsibility
  • British Conservative Shadow Chancellor backs "Open Source"! Again. But don't get Excited
  • The move to Linux, stymied by hardware...the server side...
  • Taming a power-sucking Linux TV
  • Packaging/Distribution differences
  • Geek Hero Comic: Everything is Open Source, Actually
  • Stable kernels 2.6.27.16 and 2.6.28.5
  • Fighting Dell’s customer support service…
  • Open source ERP and SMB
  • Small things in Linux that make me happy
  • Linux celebrates its 1234567890'th breath

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto SetUp Dual-Dual NIC Bonding On Ubuntu

  • Screencasting in Linux!
  • How to add static route through a virtual (alias) interface in RHEL5?
  • Crush images on the command-line with Groovy
  • A few tips for a better EeePC
  • Kill the process locking a file
  • Plot your graphs with command line gnuplot
  • HowTo: Reset the XOrg configuration file in Debian
  • HOWTO: Install THC-Hydra 5.4 in Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex
  • Bcfg2 0.9.6 debian package for etch
  • clear cached memory in ubuntu
  • Change screen resolution in Ubuntu Linux
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

  • Debian Developers Make Progress With RISC-V Port
    Debian developers continue making progress with a -- currently unofficial -- port of their Linux operating system to RISC-V. There is a in-progress Debian GNU/Linux port to RISC-V along with a repository with packages built for RISC-V. RISC-V for the uninitiated is a promising, open-source ISA for CPUs. So far there isn't any widely-available RISC-V hardware, but there are embedded systems in the works while software emulators are available.
  • 2×08: Pique Oil
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 KDE
  • deepin 15.4 Released, With Download Link & Mirrors
    deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux operating system has been released at April 19th 2017. I list here one official download link and two faster mirrors from Sourceforge. I listed here the Mega and Google mirrors as well but remember they don't provide direct download. The 15.4 provided only as 64 bit, the 32 bit version has already dropped (except by commercial support). I hope this short list helps you.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Overlayfs snapshots
    At the 2017 Vault storage conference, Amir Goldstein gave a talk about using overlayfs in a novel way to create snapshots for the underlying filesystem. His company, CTERA Networks, has used the NEXT3 ext3-based filesystem with snapshots, but customers want to be able to use larger filesystems than those supported by ext3. Thus he turned to overlayfs as a way to add snapshots for XFS and other local filesystems. NEXT3 has a number of shortcomings that he wanted to address with overlayfs snapshots. Though it only had a few requirements, which were reasonably well supported, NEXT3 never got upstream. It was ported to ext4, but his employer stuck with the original ext3-based system, so the ext4 version was never really pushed for upstream inclusion.
  • Five days and counting
    It is five days left until foss-north 2017, so it is high time to get your ticket! Please notice that tickets can be bought all the way until the night of the 25th (Tuesday), but catering is only included is you get your ticket on the 24th (Monday), so help a poor organizer and get your tickets as soon as possible!
  • OpenStack Radium? Maybe…but it could be Formidable
    OK the first results are in from the OpenStack community naming process for the R release. The winner at this point is Radium.
  • Libreboot Wants Back Into GNU
    Early this morning, Libreboot’s lead developer Leah Rowe posted a notice to the project’s website and a much longer post to the project’s subreddit, indicating that she would like to submit (or resubmit, it’s not clear how that would work at this point) the project to “rejoin the GNU Project.” The project had been a part of GNU from May 14 through September 15 of last year, at which time Ms. Rowe very publicly removed the project from GNU while making allegations of misdeeds by both GNU and the Free Software Foundation. Earlier this month, Rowe admitted that she had been dealing with personal issues at the time and had overreacted. The project also indicated that it had reorganized and that Rowe was no longer in full control.
  • Understanding the complexity of copyleft defense

    The fundamental mechanism defending software freedom is copyleft, embodied in GPL. GPL, however, functions only through upholding it--via GPL enforcement. For some, enforcement has been a regular activity for 30 years, but most projects don't enforce: they live with regular violations. Today, even under the Community Principles of GPL Enforcement, GPL enforcement is regularly criticized and questioned. The complex landscape is now impenetrable for developers who wish their code to remain forever free. This talk provides basic history and background information on the topic.

  • After Bill Gates Backs Open Access, Steve Ballmer Discovers The Joys Of Open Data
    A few months ago, we noted that the Gates Foundation has emerged as one of the leaders in requiring the research that it funds to be released as open access and open data -- an interesting application of the money that Bill Gates made from closed-source software. Now it seems that his successor as Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer, has had a similar epiphany about openness. Back in 2001, Ballmer famously called GNU/Linux "a cancer". Although he later softened his views on software somewhat, that was largely because he optimistically claimed that the threat to Microsoft from free software was "in the rearview mirror". Not really: today, the Linux-based Android has almost two orders of magnitude more market share than Windows Phone.
  • New Open Door Policy for GitHub Developer Program
    GitHub has opened the doors on its three year old GitHub Developer Program. As of Monday, developers no longer need to have paid accounts to participate. "We're opening the program up to all developers, even those who don't have paid GitHub accounts," the company announced in a blog post. "That means you can join the program no matter which stage of development you're in,"
  • MuleSoft Joins the OpenAPI Initiative: The End of the API Spec Wars
    Yesterday, MuleSoft, the creators of RAML, announced that they have joined the Open API Initiative. Created by SmartBear Software and based on the wildly popular Swagger Specification, the OpenAPI Initiative is a Linux Foundation project with over 20 members, including Adobe, IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Salesforce.