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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 10:43am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 10:41am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 10:40am
Story Material Design, Google Now Support and Timezone Autoupdate Will Come to Chrome OS Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 10:22am
Story More OpenELEC Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 10:00am
Story Top 5 Open Source Email Clients For Linux Mohd Sohail 30/03/2015 - 9:58am
Story Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) Now Based on Linux Kernel 3.19.2 Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:44am
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:42am
Story South-Tyrol finances open source eInvoicing tool Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:38am
Story Linux Mint Developers Launched a New Project Called mint-dev-tools Rianne Schestowitz 30/03/2015 - 9:29am

Jolicloud - Distro Review

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: With the recent popularity netbooks have experienced in the last two years we have seen a slew of Linux distros released gear specifically for these tiny screens. For the last couple of weeks I have had my Asus EEE PC booting an upcoming netbook orientated distro called Jolicloud.

FOSS, FUD and Freeloaders

Filed under
Linux
OSS

igneousquill.net: The open source community is, in my experience, a fairly friendly place for the most part. Seriously. Only rarely do I run into serious jerks in the FOSS crowd. When I do, though, the circumstances usually follow a pattern.

eWEEK at 25: Open Source Has Proven a Remarkably Fertile Platform

Filed under
OSS

eweek.com: PC Week's (now eWEEK's) birth year—1984—was a busy one for technology. One platform that began to take shape at that time was focused not on hardware or software but on licensing. Richard Stallman quit his job at MIT to start the GNU project and the open-source model has since driven much innovation in enterprise technology.

How to Build Your Own Custom Linux Distro

Filed under
SUSE

maximumpc.com: Although most Linux users rely on pre-built Linux distros and customize their software configuration after installation, there is nothing quite like having a Linux distro that was custom-designed to your specifications.

The 10 dumbest Firefox add-ons ever

Filed under
Moz/FF

crave.cnet.co.uk: Firefox is one of the towering achievements of the open-source movement, accounting for almost a quarter of all Web site visits just five years after its launch. One of the reasons for its enormous popularity is that it can be easily customised with a range of add-ons. But along with the really useful stuff, there's also plenty of total dross in there.

Myth of the Bad Ubuntu Release

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Myth of the Bad Ubuntu Release
  • Q&A: Ubuntu 9.10 security
  • Ubuntu 9.10 on Netbooks - Part 2
  • Kubuntu 9.10: Fast, Stable, Yet Average

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Apache at 10: You Can't Buy Us
  • UOW: The Ubuntu Learning Project
  • Sabayon Linux 5.1 Rolling Along
  • Backup your DVDs on Linux
  • Building A Benchmarking Test Farm With Phoromatic
  • Debian Public Keys Error 2
  • Is open source selling out?
  • Going Linux Nov 05 - Listener Feedback
  • A case of double vision?
  • Some More Gnome Panel Clock Applet Styles
  • Canonical Matching Creative Commons Donations
  • Open source software and the need for speed
  • Murphy's Law: What is Skype Up To?
  • Egoboo is a fun 3D Rogue-like game for Windows, Mac, and Linux
  • the state of perl in mandriva 2010
  • Desktop Linux needs salesmen
  • Linux Outlaws 120 - The Brown Mod

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Switching from Compiz to the KDE Native Composite Engine
  • How to Install Cairo Dock on Ubuntu 9.10
  • Cairo Dock Black Background Fix
  • Pimping Linux with Gigolo
  • Getting a Scanner to work in Linux
  • 8 Resources for Expanding Your Open Source Skillset
  • A few tips for dialup users running Linux
  • Starting services at boot in Linux
  • plasmabac – backup & restore plasma settings
  • Finding Geotagged Photos in digiKam
  • Ubun-student – install professional software in Ubuntu

The Web may have won, but Gopher tunnels on

Filed under
Web

arstechnica.com: Remember Gopher? The protocol predated the Web, and a hardy band of enthusiasts have kept Gopherspace alive. Ars takes a look back at Gopher and shows you how to use it to browse Twitter and 4chan.

Linux: still better for coding

Filed under
Linux

antirez.com: Something like one year ago I switched from Linux to Mac OS X. It was not an easy switch if you think that my desktop on Linux used to be with a minimal configuration, super fast virtual desktop, border-less windows. What I'm missing are a number of important tools that made the Linux experience so much comfortable. So here is my list of what's wrong with Mac.

Current State of Intel Video, Ubuntu, and Composited Desktops

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

redmonk.com/sogrady: I’ve had persistent issues with Intel Video since the Jaunty release of Ubuntu. The short version is that the fancy effects that I eventually came to depend on stopped working after the Intrepid release of the distribution. Both Jaunty and Karmic include Intel video drivers – and I’ve tried every bleeding edge PPA version I can find – that simply don’t work with Compiz.

The Psychology Of A Distrohopper

Filed under
Linux

jimlynch.com: There’s a unique breed of Linux user out there these days and they’re called “distrohoppers.” So what exactly makes somebody keep switching around to different Linux distributions? I don’t think it has anything to do with a natural tendency toward distropromiscuity.

Hey Ubuntu, Stop Making Linux Look Bad

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-mag.com: Ubuntu’s new Karmic Koala 9.10 release has been highly anticipated as the greatest release ever. In truth, it falls flat on its face in a time when Linux really needed to shine.

Is The Crunchpad Dead?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

businessinsider.com: The CrunchPad, TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington's entry into the gadget business, is still missing in action. Are higher-than-expected costs to blame?

Gentoo KDE3 Deprecation Notice

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org: After multiple setbacks we have finally managed to stabilise KDE4 on both major desktop architectures (amd64 and x86), with other teams to follow. The KDE3 support is being deprecated with immediate effect.

Linux's share of netbooks surging, not sagging

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworld.com: Reports that the Linux netbook is dead or dying are incorrect, at least globally, according to an analyst firm.

Windows 7 or Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Windows 7 or Ubuntu 9.10 – battle of the operating systems
  • Linux for grandma & grandpa
  • Ubuntu 9.10 on Netbooks, Part 1

Mandriva Linux 2010 officially announced

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: Mandriva is proud to introduce its brand new release: Mandriva Linux 2010, code name Adelie. Take a look on a new desktop: smart, innovative and open! Mandriva Linux 2010, code name Adelie. Mandriva Linux is the only distribution including both KDE, GNOME all integrated.

Apache Software Foundation: 10 years and still open to innovation

Filed under
Software

networkworld.com: It's been 10 years since the Apache Software Foundation hung out its feather, creating what has become a series of communities filled with focused project entrepreneurs working on a laundry list of innovative efforts, one of which landed in the White House just a few weeks ago.

Bob Sutor: Working with Ubuntu 9.10: initial impressions

Filed under
Ubuntu

sutor.com: I’ve been playing with the latest Ubuntu desktop release, 9.10 Karmic Koala, since the first beta and I’ve now been using it full time for business work for three days. Here are my impressions and comments:

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

  • Connected sex-toy allows for code-injection attacks on a robot you wrap around your genitals

    However, the links included base-64 encoded versions of the entire blowjob file, making it vulnerable to code-injection attacks. As Lewis notes, "I will leave you to ponder the consequences of having an XSS vulnerability on a page with no framebusting and preauthed connection to a robot wrapped around or inside someones genitals..."

  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty
    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice. In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks. Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS. By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.” More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?
  • Why microservices are a security issue
    And why is that? Well, for those of us with a systems security bent, the world is an interesting place at the moment. We're seeing a growth in distributed systems, as bandwidth is cheap and latency low. Add to this the ease of deploying to the cloud, and more architects are beginning to realise that they can break up applications, not just into multiple layers, but also into multiple components within the layer. Load balancers, of course, help with this when the various components in a layer are performing the same job, but the ability to expose different services as small components has led to a growth in the design, implementation, and deployment of microservices.

Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine. "The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required." Read more

today's leftovers

  • qBittorrent 4.0 Is a Massive Update of the Open-Source BitTorrent Client
    qBittorrent, the open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client written in Qt for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, has been updated to version 4.0, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements. qBittorrent 4.0 is the first release of the application to drop OS/2 support, as well as support for the old Qt 4 framework as Qt 5.5.1 or later is now required to run it on all supported platforms. It also brings a new logo and a new SVG-based icon theme can be easily scaled. Lots of other cosmetic changes are present in this release, and the WebGUI received multiple enhancements.
  • FFmpeg Continues Working Its "NVDEC" NVIDIA Video Decoding Into Shape
    Earlier this month the FFmpeg project landed its initial NVDEC NVIDIA video decoding support after already supporting NVENC for video encoding. These new NVIDIA APIs for encode/decode are part of the company's Video Codec SDK with CUDA and is the successor to the long-used VDPAU video decoding on NVIDIA Linux boxes. That NVDEC support has continued getting into shape.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.10075 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    A new firmware for the Kobo ebook reader came out and I adjusted the mega update pack to use it. According to the comments in the firmware thread it is working faster than previous releases. The most incredible change though is the update from wpa_supplicant 0.7.1 (around 2010) to 2.7-devel (current). Wow.
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC has dual mini-PCIe slots and triple displays
    Avalue’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ECM-APL2” SBC features Apollo Lake SoCs, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, triple displays, and optional -40 to 85°C. Avalue’s 3.5-inch, Apollo Lake based ECM-APL single-board computer was announced a year ago, shortly after Intel unveiled its Apollo Lake generation. Now it has followed up with an ECM-APL2 3.5-incher with a slightly different, and reduced, feature set.
  • 7 Best Android Office Apps To Meet Your Productivity Needs
    Office application is an essential suite that allows you to create powerful spreadsheets, documents, presentations, etc., on a smartphone. Moreover, Android office apps come with cloud integration so that you can directly access the reports from the cloud, edit them, or save them online. To meet the productivity need of Android users, the Play Store offers an extensive collection of Android office apps. But, we have saved you the hassle of going through each one of them and provided you a list of the best office apps for Android. The apps that we have picked are all free, although some do have Pro version or extra features available for in-app purchases. You can also refer to this list if you’re looking for Microsoft Office alternatives for your PC.

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