Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Review: Linux Mint 15 "Olivia" KDE + Xfce srlinuxx 07/08/2013 - 12:01am
Story The Performance Penalty Of Xfce/Xubuntu On XMir srlinuxx 06/08/2013 - 11:59pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 06/08/2013 - 8:24pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 06/08/2013 - 5:33pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 06/08/2013 - 5:05pm
Story Xubuntu XMir ISOs Available srlinuxx 06/08/2013 - 4:19am
Story Kali Linux – the distro for security geeks srlinuxx 06/08/2013 - 4:07am
Story GNOME 3.10 to be Offered for Wayland Beside X srlinuxx 06/08/2013 - 4:06am
Story How to install a fully portable desktop on a USB for on-the-go access srlinuxx 05/08/2013 - 9:07pm
Story Compiz vs. KWin: Which Window Manager Is Better? srlinuxx 05/08/2013 - 9:05pm

Desktop Linux should address these little annoyances

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Users are right when they say linux is not ready for desktop. And they are right when they point to some rough edges of linux. I would like to add a small point that many others have missed out.

Goodbye PCLinuxOS!! Hello gOS!!

Filed under
Linux

themarktrix.blogspot: This happened on Friday, where my very loyal PCLinuxOS system had finally shown its age. Constant desktop freezes/crashes and the signs of slowing down prompted me to go distro-hopping again.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • XTerm Title

  • Using puppet on Gentoo
  • Yum Force Reinstall
  • Hybernate on CentOS5.1
  • Fixing Kubuntu’s trash icon

The Perfect Desktop - Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes step-by-step how to set up a Fedora 9 desktop (GNOME). The result is a fast, secure and extendable system that provides all you need for daily work and entertainment.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • An interview with p_quarles

  • Reflections on Open Source Commerce, Part 2
  • My Fedora 9 upgrade story
  • Linux week in Vienna
  • Linux distro madness
  • And This is Why I Use Open Source Software
  • The path of least-patching
  • Ubuntu…What have you done?
  • Fedora 9 feature - kernel modesetting
  • Fedora 9.. round 1
  • Blaming Debian packaging
  • Back from vacation at Disney World and Tux Racer is all over

10 Most Beautiful Looking Linux Desktops

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: Over the years I came across many many linux Desktop screenshots, it’s amazing how someone can spend huge amount of time tweaking and customizing their desktop look. Here are some I really liked.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Make Your Distro Free of Miguel de Icaza’s junk code

  • How to indent lines in text files using sed, awk, perl
  • Tips for Upgrading Fedora 8 to Fedora 9
  • Building Software From Source
  • QEMU - machine emulator and virtualizer Setup in Ubuntu
  • Doing Search And Replace In Multiple Files With Unix and Linux Perl

Ubuntu's need to catch a wave

Filed under
Ubuntu

dag.wieers.com/blog: Let me play devil's advocate here. Mark Shuttleworth's recent pledge to join a synchronised release plan for Enterprise Linux distributions is no more than a wish to benefit from a lot of work that Novell and Red Hat are already doing in the Enterprise space.

Why I won't even try Fedora 9

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: It might sound very bizarre, knowing that I was using Rawhide quite some time before F9 was released. However... I am not impressed by the way Fedora 9 is becoming "yet another Ubuntu."

Adventures with Ubuntu and XP and the family computer

Filed under
Ubuntu

mindstab.net: So my folks Windows XP box started having difficulty booting. Most of the time it would go to boot and suddenly you'd be back at the BIOS. So I burned a copy of Hardy Heron, the newest Version of Ubuntu, released just last month. It loaded up and recognized all the hardware and installed, no trouble.

Ubuntu Security Notice another win for Linux

Filed under
Linux

dthomasdigital.wordpress: What is that I say, a win for Linux? I think was handled much better than any Microsoft vulnerability ever has. Notifications were sent from multiple sources. If it was a Debian based distribution it was made perfectly clear you needed to install the security updates.

Firefox 3 RC 1: A Guided Tour

Filed under
Moz/FF

ostatic.com: I've been using all the previous beta versions, and while I'm still frustrated that I can't use my extensions with RC1, the rendering speed is so much faster than previous versions that I'm ready to use it as my main browser most of the time. It is still pre-release software, but the speed and several of the new features are truly welcome.

Early Days with KDE 4: openSUSE 10.3, Kubuntu 8.04 and Fedora 9 compared

Filed under
KDE

softvision.wordpress: Arch has taught me so much and I will go back to it one day. For now, I plan to decide between three popular KDE distros - openSUSE, Kubuntu and Fedora. The desktop environment of choice? KDE 4.0.

Firefox 3 First Look

Filed under
Moz/FF

sjvn: I've loved Firefox since version 0.93. It was so much better than Internet Explorer and the other alternatives that I couldn't imagine using anything else. But, then Firefox's memory leaks went from annoying me to ticking me off. Now, Firefox 3 release candidate 1 was released early. Based on my quick look at it, I may end up sticking with Firefox after all.

Piracy under attack

Filed under
OSS

business-standard.com: The price of software increases every year, the total value of software piracy as calculated by it is bound to increase even if there's a dip in piracy rates. There's now an open-source alternative for almost every major software need, ranging from databases and office suites to business applications.

some blogging shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • When Ubuntu tries to be Fedora

  • 24 hours with Fedora 9
  • Fedora 8 to 9
  • Upgrade to Fedora 9
  • Fedora 9: First Impressions
  • Harald Hoyer Appointed to Fedora Board
  • Linux Format Mega-Distro DVD
  • Ubuntu Distro for the Mini-Note: MinBuntu
  • AntiX saves the day
  • Mandriva

UN think tank urges legislators to support 'open source' information technologies, software

Filed under
OSS

firstscience.com: United Nations University-MERIT experts yesterday in Geneva urged parliamentarians to support open source software and information technologies as a way to let citizens participate meaningfully in the information society.

It's time to retire "ready for the desktop"

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Quite a few reviews of new Linux releases these days try to determine if a distribution is "ready for the desktop." I myself have probably been guilty of using that phrase, but I think it's time we officially retire this criterion.

25 Coolest and Funniest Tux Wallpapers

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: People just can't get enough of Tux, the world-renowned penguin mascot of Linux. I decided to give Tux lovers another treat by handing out my list of twenty coolest, funniest, and maybe cutest Tux wallpapers. So without any more delay, here they are:

Chapter 2: Project management and the GNU coding standards

Filed under
Software
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: In Chapter 1, I gave a brief overview of the Autotools and some of the resources that are currently available to help reduce the learning curve. In this chapter, we’re going to step back a little and examine project organization techniques that are applicable to all projects, not just those whose build system is managed by the Autotools.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more

nginx

Case in point: I've been using the Apache HTTP server for many years now. Indeed, you could say that I've been using Apache since before it was even called "Apache"—what started as the original NCSA HTTP server, and then the patched server that some enterprising open-source developers distributed, and finally the Apache Foundation-backed open-source colossus that everyone recognizes, and even relies on, today—doing much more than just producing HTTP servers. Apache's genius was its modularity. You could, with minimal effort, configure Apache to use a custom configuration of modules. If you wanted to have a full-featured server with tons of debugging and diagnostics, you could do that. If you wanted to have high-level languages, such as Perl and Tcl, embedded inside your server for high-speed Web applications, you could do that. If you needed the ability to match, analyze and rewrite every part of an HTTP transaction, you could do that, with mod_rewrite. And of course, there were third-party modules as well. Read more