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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The first "Steam Machine" has been revealed Roy Schestowitz 14/12/2013 - 8:01am
Story Mandriva moving closer to release Roy Schestowitz 14/12/2013 - 7:57am
Story Qt 5.2 Released | The Best Qt Yet Roy Schestowitz 14/12/2013 - 7:54am
Story Canonical Is Forking The GNOME Control Center Roy Schestowitz 14/12/2013 - 1:30am
Story Acer C720 Chromebook Delivers Fast Ubuntu Performance Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 11:49pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 11:42pm
Story Cluster update Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 9:32pm
Story Dell and Red Hat's OpenStack Alliance To Open Many Enterprise Doors Rianne Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:50pm
Story Munich’s push to Linux complete Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:42pm
Story Linux's New Game: the Internet of Things Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:37pm

GNOME Do and The Network Backed Plugin Architecture

Filed under
Software So I like GNOME Do. That’s not exactly a secret. Nor am I the only one. While it’s obviously - and admittedly - highly derivative of the OS X Quicksilver application, it’s a nice piece of work. One that continues to evolve.

Clashes over goals force top LinuxChix to quit

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Linux Mary Gardiner, the Australia-based coordinator of international group LinuxChix has resigned due to a major mismatch in goals. LinuxChix is an international open source group for women who are interested in Linux and anyone who wishes to support women in computing.

Firefox 3.0 boosts Mozilla's market share Firefox's share ended the week at 19.17%, said Vince Vizzaccaro, the Web metrics firm's executive vice president of marketing. That's up 0.76% from the 18.41% it posted for May.

Also: Review: Firefox 3 Web browser
And: Opinion: Firefox 3 add-ons: Must-have tools

NVIDIA GeForce 9800GTX 512MB with Ubuntu

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Hardware We've been meaning to deliver benchmarks of the NVIDIA GeForce 9800GTX under Linux for some time. Finally we are delivering these benchmarks of the GeForce 9800GTX with Ubuntu Linux and using the most recent NVIDIA driver release.

Inside Users and Accounts

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HowTos Like Windows, Linux allows multiple user accounts on the same installation. Each account limits its user in specific ways—folder and hardware access, settings control, and so on.

Firefox 3 Hits 17.3 Million Downloads

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Moz/FF Since launch last week in excess of 17.3 million downloads of Firefox 3 have taken place. The browser saw 8 million downloads within the first 24-hours of its release.

Also: My Experiences with Firefox 3.0 on Linux, Windows and Mac OS X

New media center OS is pleasing to the eye and ear

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Linux Acoustic Reality is a Danish company that sells speakers, amplifiers, storage devices, cables, and other products to build top-shelf home entertainment centers. It recently released eAR OS Free Edition, a free media center system built on top of Ubuntu that features a free version of its Acoustic Reality software technology.

Can Linux find one good way to install software?

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Linux I’m not sure when the fights over how to install programs started in Linux, but it was probably not longer after there were three Linux users on the planet. Things haven’t gotten any better.

Security Features of Firefox 3.0

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Moz/FF Lets take a look at the security features of the newly released Firefox 3.0. Since it's release on Tuesday I have been testing it out to see how the new security enhancements work and help in increase user browsing security.

Linux Server Tournament, part 2

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Our nominees are BEL Server Basic (KDE), UServer 8.04 LTS, OpenSuse 11 and CentOS 5.

Situationally, we talked about what we felt were the 'keypoint' strengths' of each distro and what role we would fit them into the LAN as.

This is a small LAN, one of the purposes of using Linux as a server for our intents is to provide small/medium sized businesses an option that makes the most out of available resources. Which often means using equipment at hand or easily (low cost) gotten.

We learn by doing

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linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Many articles try to tackle how best to learn Linux. We thought we'd take a stab at answering this. There are "phases" in learning Linux and the approaches to learning change over the course of a persons time spent using Linux.

Bill Gates, in other people's words

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Microsoft "Is it the tradition here to give Bill the finger whenever you go through these doors?" — Free software movement leader Richard Stallman, to a student outside Stanford University's Bill Gates Building.

OpenSuSE 11: Channeling Vista

Filed under
  • OpenSuSE 11: Channeling Vista

  • OpenSUSE 11: A Feature-Rich Distro in Search of Direction
  • Opensuse 11 Released and First Impressions

  • openSUSE 11.0
  • openSUSE 11 installation this weekend

htop as an alternative top

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Software “top” is one of those programs, that are used quite often but actually nobody talks about. It just does its job: showing statistics about memory, cache and cpu consumption, listing processes and so on. It’s the ncurses based “htop” and we’ll have a closer look at it now.

Use the source

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OSS On too many occasions I've found myself staring dumbfounded at my computer screen, wondering "what's going on in there?" Despite the steadily raising computer savvy in today's high tech populace, many software companies still believe it best to not burden our pretty little heads with what exactly they're doing on our machines. The Open Source paradigm seeks to do away with the black box mentality.

Ubuntu Team Readies For 8.04.1

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Ubuntu With Ubuntu 8.04.1 scheduled to be released on July 3 the Ubuntu development team is putting the final touches to the popular Linux distribution. Ubuntu 8.04.1 not a new release of Ubuntu but an updated CD image so that users trying Ubuntu 8.04 for the first time only have to download the CD image and not all the updates.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 258

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: From Fedora 9 to openSUSE 11.0

  • News: Mandriva 2009 release plans, extended support for RHEL 4/5, Debian on ASUS Eee PC, Ubuntu Netbook Remix review
  • Released last week: openSUSE 11.0, Kurumin NG 8.06
  • Upcoming releases: Pardus Linux 2008, Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 1
    Site news: Annual package database update

  • New distributions: BoliviaOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Linux is Subversive....

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Glyn Moody: So begins Eric Raymond's famous analysis of why free software works, The Cathedral and the Bazaar. But alongside this deep-rooted, conceptual subversion, there is Subversion the program, a new release of which has just appeared:

openSUSE 11.0

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skywake-andstuff.blogspot: Having spent the last three days downloading openSUSE 11.0 only for it to finish downloading at 11:10 PM last night I must say it was worth the three days of waiting for what is probably the simplest and most complete OS install I have ever done.

Position Statement on Linux Kernel Modules

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Linux As part of the Linux Foundation Technical board, we confront the issue of closed source Linux kernel modules all the time, and we wanted to do something that could be seen as a general "public statement" about them that is easy to understand and point to when people have questions.

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More in Tux Machines

DevOps Handbook and Course

Leftovers: Gaming

Android Leftovers

  • Off We Go: Oracle Officially Appeals Google's Fair Use Win
    It was only a matter of time until this happened, but Oracle has officially appealed its fair use Java API loss to the Federal Circuit (CAFC). As you recall, after a years-long process, including the (correct) ruling that APIs are not covered by copyright being ridiculously overturned by CAFC, a new trial found that even if APIs are copyright-eligible, Google's use was covered by fair use. Oracle then tried multiple times to get Judge William Alsup to throw out the jury's ruling, but failed. In fact, on Oracle's second attempt to get Alsup to throw out the jury's ruling, citing "game changing" evidence that Google failed to hand over important information on discovery, it actually turned out that Oracle's lawyers had simply failed to read what Google had, in fact, handed over.
  • On iMessage’s Stickiness
  • Physical RAM attack can root Android and possibly other devices [Ed: Memory flipping is not at all an Android problem]

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Enterprise Open Source Programs Flourish -- In Tech and Elsewhere
    If you cycled the clock back about 15 years and surveyed the prevailing beliefs about open source technology at the time, you would find nowhere near the volume of welcome for it that we see today. As a classic example, The Register reported all the way back in 2001 that former CEO of Microsoft Steve Ballmer made the following famous statement in a Chicago Sun-Times interview: "Linux is a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches."
  • 5 More Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    In part one of this series, I covered my top five reasons to love Kubernetes, the open source container orchestration platform created by Google. Kubernetes was donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation in July of 2015, where it is now under development by dozens of companies including Canonical, CoreOS, Red Hat, and more. My first five reasons were primarily about the project’s heritage, ease of use, and ramp-up. The next five get more technical. As I mentioned in part one, choosing a distributed system to perform tasks in a datacenter is much more complex than looking at a spreadsheet of features or performance. And, you should make your decision based on your own needs and team dynamics. However, this top 10 list will give you my perspective, as someone who has been using, testing, and developing systems for a while now.
  • Bankers plan to give Corda blockchain code to Hyperledger project
  • Are European Banks Falling Behind in Blockchain Development?
  • Hyperledger adds 10 new members to support open source distributed ledger framework
    The Linux Foundation's Hyperledger project has announced that 10 new members have joined the project in order to help create an open standard for distributed ledgers for a new generation of transactional applications.
  • The Blockchain Created By Ethereum's Fork is Forking Now
    A blockchain that was born out of the rejection of a contentious technical change is on the cusp of making a decision some argue contradicts its core values. That's the situation the developers behind ethereum classic face ahead of a hard fork expected to be enacted on its blockchain on 25th October (should network participants approve the upgrade). Originally formed in reaction to a decision by the ethereum community to edit its "immutable" ledger, the fork caused an ideological schism among its enthusiasts. Alarmed by the action (or seeing a chance to profit by continuing the original network), miners and speculators began running its blockchain, which developers named "ethereum classic". Other investors then bought into the vision, and today, there are currently 85m classic ethers (ETC) worth $87m.
  • Red Hat: OpenStack moving beyond the proof-of-concept phase
    Red Hat’s annual poll found that 43 percent of respondents have deployed the cloud platform in production, compared to just 16 percent one year ago. The company reckons the increase reflects efforts by the community to address complexity and deployment issues that were previously known to have been a major roadblock to adoption. The study also noted that the steep learning curve for deploying OpenStack is being addressed as a growing number of engineers become certified to operate the platform. In addition, Red Hat cited cloud native application development as another driving force in enterprise adoption of OpenStack.
  • OpenStack Summit Emphasizes Security, Interoperability
    From security to interoperabilty to use cases and everything in-between, this week's OpenStack Summit from Oct. 25 to 28 in Barcelona, is set to illuminate the cloud. This year's event, which brings together vendors, operators and developers of the open-source cloud platform, will offer more sessions than ever before on securing OpenStack clouds. The Barcelona Summit follows the release of the OpenStack Newton milestone, which debuted on Oct. 6. While discussions about the most recent release are always part of every OpenStack Summit, so too are case-studies from operators of OpenStack clouds.
  • A complete view into application security must include open source [Ed: Black Duck spam (self-promotional marketing) takes form of FOSS FUD, as usual]
  • While Other Cities Go Linux, Toronto Bets Big on Microsoft Software [Ed: Toronto joins the Dark Forces]
    "" The partnership between Microsoft and the city of Toronto certainly comes at the right time, as other authorities across the world already announced decisions to give up on Windows and Office and replace them with open-source alternatives. Munich is the city that started the entire trend, but it wasn’t at all a smooth transition. Some of the local officials proposed a return to Microsoft software, claiming that training and assistance actually impacted productivity and explaining that in the end it all pays off to use Microsoft software because of the familiarity that users experience, which translates to a substantial productivity boost. And yet, the transition off Microsoft products is happening and more authorities are willing to do it, not necessarily because of the costs, but also due to security concerns, as is the case of Russia.
  • Open-Source Toolkit Lets Communities Build Their Own Street Furniture
    Despite the vast amount of customization options technology has allotted us, it can still be difficult to create projects that are community-centric. For example, though 3D printing can help us personalize our own jewelry, it has limited use for outfitting parks with trash cans or equipping bus stops with comfortable seating. Still, hyper-customizable tech has taught us the convenience of managing our own products, eliminating the bureaucratic complications of mass produced, production-line assembly. Leveraging this ideology to better the community, the Better Block Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to building local communities, has developed an open-source toolkit for creating a variety of fixtures for communities. The platform, called Wikiblock, allows designs ranging from benches to beer garden fences to be downloaded and taken to a maker space where a computer-aided machine can print the design from plywood. Similar to Ikea’s simplistic, DIY approach, the printed wood can be assembled by hand, without glue or nails.
  • How to make a lighted, porch bag for Halloween
    While I typically go all out for Halloween decorations every year, I'll admit I'm feeling tired this year. I still wanted to delight the neighborhood kids with simple details, so I decided to make lighted bags for my front porch railing this year. If you are someone who has a paper cutting machine like the Silhouette, this project will likely be a lot easier. Simply import the SVG file, resize for whatever size box you want, cut out, and assemble. However, for those of you who don't have one, I've included instructions on how to make this project without any machine at all. The box was created with the help of artists who share their art at OpenClipArt. I also used Inkscape to create the SVG file. If you don't like bats, you could modify the SVG file to include other types of clipart in the center of the bag.