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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A weekend spent cheating on Ubuntu with Fedora 22 Roy Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 7:31pm
Story Dell is back in bed with Linux Roy Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 7:25pm
Story Red Hat CEO: 'A large percentage of the Fortune 500 will be left behind' Roy Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 4:36pm
Story Aptdaemon Exploit Closed in Ubuntu OSes Rianne Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 4:09pm
Story CUTELYST 0.9.0 IS OUT! Rianne Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 4:03pm
Story Qt Is Looking At Making Qt 5.6 A Long-Term Support Release Rianne Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 3:49pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 3:41pm
Story Healthcare trade group to validate open source solutions Rianne Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 3:24pm
Story Go beyond Bootstrap with PatternFly Rianne Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 2:57pm
Story Ubuntu Touch to Switch Soon to Ubuntu Snappy Core Rianne Schestowitz 18/06/2015 - 1:19pm

Five Free PDF viewers for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

unixlab.blogspot: Portable document format is one of the most popular file formats on the web. Of course Adobe is the market leader for PDF. However, there are lot of free alternatives around. Here are some free pdf viewers for ubuntu.

Linux super-duper admin tools: screen

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: Time to learn about yet another cool little admin application that will change the way you think and work. screen is a full-screen window manager that multiplexes a physical terminal between several processes, typically interactive shells.

OpenShot — Finally

Filed under
Software
HowTos

makeuseof.com: Video and photo editing tools are a necessity in today’s world of personal media. We have lots of photographs and videos these days that could look even better when presented nicely.

The Ultimate PC repair kit: SystemRescueCD 1.40

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: Like everyone who makes his living from computers, I'm always getting called on by friends and family to help them fix their PC problems. Thanks to the Gentoo Linux-based SystemRescueCD though, I'm usually able to fix most of their troubles without breaking a sweat.

Techgage's 5th Birthday Contest

Filed under
Web

techgage.com: Techgage has just turned five, so what better reason to celebrate? To help kill two birds with one stone, we're looking to YOU for input on what we're doing right, and what you want to see more of (or improve). As a thanks for taking our site survey, you'll be entered to have a chance at winning our custom-built gaming PC, valued at $4,200!

Multimedia Codecs and Moral Quandarie

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: I wrote recently about legal concerns involving multimedia patents on Ubuntu, and how to obtain licensed codecs without breaking the law. But I didn’t give much thought to the philosophical side of the issue.

PostgreSQL Optimizer Bits: Semi and Anti Joins

Filed under
Software

The series “PostgreSQL Optimiser Bits” will introduce the strategies and highlights of the PostgreSQL optimiser. We start today with a new feature of PostgreSQL 8.4: Semi and Anti Joins.

Sabayon 5.2 To Ship With 2.6.33 Kernel… and BFS!

Filed under
OS
Gentoo

With Sabayon fever reaching boiling point I have some cool news to break to you all, which, as you have guessed from the title is that Sabayon 5.2 will ship with 2.6.33 Kernel with Con Kolivas 1 (ck1) 2.6.33 desktop performance patches (including BFS).

More here...

Apps are Crap: The history and future of the mobile web.

Earlier this month Mark Shuster, a venture capitalist in Los Angeles, wrote a fantastic piece called App is Crap — a history of the mobile web and a look towards its future.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 343

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Desktop comparison - Zenwalk Linux, Salix OS and GoblinX
  • News: OpenSolaris survives Oracle takeover, Fedora delays first alpha, Mandriva switches to nouveau, Linux Mint prepares LXDE edition, Kubuntu repositories
  • Questions and answers: Removing zombie processes
  • Released last week: PC-BSD 8.0, Igelle 1.0.0, Vine Linux 5.1
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.3 Milestone 3
  • Donations: Squid receives US$250
  • New additions: IPFire
  • New distributions: UKnow4Kids
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Junior High students build their own Ubuntu computers

Filed under
Hardware
Interviews
Ubuntu

stop.zona-m.net: The Confalonieri Public Junior High School in Monza, Northern Italy set up a really interesting and original optional course for its students. I contacted the two teachers who run the course, Fabio Frittoli and Francesco De Gennaro to know something more.

Dual of denial – on the success and failure of dual licensing

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: There’s been a fair amount of attention – both positive and negative – on dual licensing in recent weeks. A few days ago Brian Aker wrote: “The fact is, there are few, and growing fewer, opportunities to make money on dual licensing.”

ImageMagick Fun

Filed under
Software

purinchu.net: Oe of my professors mailed us a PDF of a scanned document to read (and print out) for the next class. Being that is was scanned in there was a lot of excess black in the picture. I don’t know about you, but printing 2 large blocks of solid black, for 22 pages, doesn’t sound like a wise investment of toner. But ah! Why don’t I just crop off the excess part? This has to be easy, right?

Linux 2.6.24 Through Linux 2.6.33 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: We launched our first system in the Linux kernel testing farm just prior to the Linux 2.6.33 kernel development cycle and found a number of notable regressions during the past three months. Now with the Linux 2.6.34 kernel development cycle getting into swing, we have added an additional two systems to our daily kernel benchmarking farm.

KDE 4.4: Does It Work Yet?

Filed under
KDE

linux-mag.com: I used to love KDE way back in the KDE 1.x and KDE 2.x days of yore. I migrated away from KDE during the early 3.x days in favor of GNOME. I’m stepping back into KDE from a GNOME user’s viewpoint with a single question in my mind: “Does it work yet?”

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Daemonize any process on Linux
  • My top 10 geek epitaphs
  • Preparing the Linux Kernel Source
  • Debugging with emacs+valgrind
  • Samba: Can it get any easier?
  • Launchy: Desktop Shortcut Launcher
  • Clean up your system with Bleachbit
  • What is your taste in computing?
  • Control Your Children's Internet Access with Gnome Nanny
  • Gnome Subtitles 1.0
  • Is it time for a Windows or Linux server in your home?
  • Anarchy in the EULA
  • Using find to locate files
  • Hidden Linux : Example commands - find
  • Firefox 4 – Updates, Roadmaps And Changes So Far
  • How to remove empty spaces in filenames
  • Hello world for bare metal ARM using QEMU
  • FlightGear 2.0 Released
  • Using Tabs in the KDE 4 Taskbar

13 Linux Twitter Applications Reviewed

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: Once upon a time Twitter users had to use a web-browser to update their status and check their tweets. Then came the dawn of the twitter app...

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #182

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is Issue #182 for the week February 21st - February 27th, 2010.

Linux: Current State of Voice Dictation and Recognition

Filed under
Linux
Software

blog.eracc.com: For the past three weeks I and my research assistant have been searching the WWW for dictation software that works under GNU/Linux. We have discovered this to be an exercise in frustration with several dead ends.

Calling all Geeks – Fedora 13 needs your help

Filed under
Linux

duncsweb.com: The Fedora project needs a slogan for their next release of Fedora, Fedora 13, they need it as quick as possible so that it can be include it in the alpha release of Fedora 13 that’s coming out on March 9.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.