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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 08/11/2012 - 4:48pm
Story few odds & ends: srlinuxx 08/11/2012 - 3:26pm
Story AMD dismisses numerous open source developers srlinuxx 07/11/2012 - 5:02pm
Story Absolutely Amazing Ubuntu Alternatives srlinuxx 07/11/2012 - 8:58am
Blog entry Building your own cloud using OwnCloud on Ubuntu. fieldyweb 05/11/2012 - 9:48pm
Story Apple's poisonous Touch silently kills the GNOMEs of Linux Forest srlinuxx 04/11/2012 - 9:53pm
Blog entry The 3 Wise Smartphones this christmas fieldyweb 04/11/2012 - 2:33pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 03/11/2012 - 5:08pm
Story LibreOffice: A Continuing Tale of FOSS Success srlinuxx 03/11/2012 - 3:00am
Story Pear Linux 6 Review srlinuxx 03/11/2012 - 2:59am

Nintendo Wii gains Linux port

linuxdevices: The GameCube Linux project has released a "proof of concept" Linux distribution for the Nintendo Wii gaming console. Powered by a 486MHz PowerPC processor, Wii hardware running Linux could be used as a thin client, multimedia terminal, server, or as a platform for "homebrew" computer games, the project suggests.

Hans Reiser Evading Police Because He Was Upset, Feared Arrest

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Two weeks after Linux programmer Hans Reiser's wife went missing, he performed counter-surveillance measures because he thought he would be falsely arrested and he was "upset" over being beaten that day in a custody hearing concerning his two young children.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Running Abyss, a small but feature rich web server

  • VMware 64 Bit Error: Failed to connect to peer process
  • Keyboard Shortcut to Cycle Through Workspaces in Gnome
  • Use your Ubuntu partition to fix a corrupt registry on a Windows XP partition
  • python convey the exception traceback into log file
  • How can I configure squid so that it never caches some web sites?
  • Restore Missing Icons in OpenOffice
  • Gplot simplifies gnuplot graph creation
  • Installing Packages in SLED/SLES through the command line
  • Mounting ISO's
  • Vim Setup - Tuning Vim To The Environment
  • Managing Services in Ubuntu, Part II: Managing Runlevels

Understanding Top

Filed under
HowTos

raiden.net: One of the greatest performance tools today for any aspiring systems engineer, or even your average joe, is the program called "top". It's a very useful tool that can tell you a lot of information about your system, it's current performance, system loads and more at a single glance.

100 Days & Counting For UT3 Linux Client

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: It's with much disesteem that today marks 100 days since the release of Unreal Tournament 3 and there still is no UT3 Linux client available or any word when it may be released.

Ubuntu Landscape systems management tool set to launch

Filed under
Ubuntu

searchenterpriselinux.techtarget.com: After a six-month beta period, Canonical Ltd. is adding management muscle to Ubuntu Linux servers and desktops in the form of its Landscape systems management tool.

Making open hardware possible

Filed under
Hardware

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Open Source has many benefits: you can get more secure software, faster updates, lots of tutorials and, definitely, a new way of making software and software that builds communities. From this, the next logical step was Open Hardware.

PCs for Five C's

Filed under
Hardware

itmanagement.earthweb.com: Of course a $500 price tag isn't unprecedented. For a couple of years or more, retail superstores have offered consumers $500 desktops suitable for use as a family's second or third PC. These days, several vendors stock $199 Linux systems ready to be the family's fifth or sixth.

Also: Building a Gaming Computer is Easy

DSL 4.2: a Good Thing that Comes in Small Package

Filed under
Linux

junauza.blogspot: Damn Small Linux (DSL) is a minuscule distro that is based on Knoppix. My last peek at Damn Small Linux was with version 3.4.3. I decided that it was about time to have a look at the latest release which is 4.2.5 and see what’s up.

New Details Emerge on Ubuntu Mobile

Filed under
Ubuntu

digitaltrends.com: Cult followers of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution already know that their favorite operating system will make the jump from computers to mobile devices, but new details have begun to emerge recently.

Vomit or Linux: your choice

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Imagine standing on the road. An oncoming car is heading rapidly towards you. You have a choice to move, or to stay. Now consider that in business you need to choose a server platform wisely but often Windows shops become entrenched because it is the status quo. Here's why you ought to think about it more.

Everex gPC mini: Linux Mini Clone

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

i4u.com: Everex introduces the gPC mini. The gPC mini is a very small PC running gOS Linux. The specification of the Everex gPC mini includes 1.86GHz Intel Pentium Dual-Core Mobile Processor T2130, 512MB RAM, 120GB HDD, and DVD burner.

How I Learned to Stop Killing Myself and Learn Vim

Filed under
Software

linuxtidbits.wordpress: When I first started Linux, I fired up “Text Editor” and almost collapsed. What the hell was that? I like many Windows and Mac users, hit this bird on the first flyover of Linux. Now I could have used Open Office but I’m an old dog, and if I’m gonna be taught new tricks they better be damn good ones.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 11

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: In this week’s issue: Factory Live CDs Now Available, Mono Hack Week Summary, and In Tips and Tricks: How to fix the Amarok Update Problems; How to try out openSUSE releases with VirtualBox.

EU fines Microsoft record $1.35 billion

Filed under
Microsoft

reuters.com: The European Commission fined Microsoft a record 899 million euros ($1.35 billion) on Wednesday for defying sanctions imposed on the software giant for antitrust violations, far exceeding the original penalty.

EDE, the forgotten desktop environment

Filed under
Software

beranger.org: Equinox Desktop Environment (shortly EDE) is small desktop environment, built to be simple and fast. It is based on modified FLTK library (called extended FLTK or just eFLTK). Comparing to other desktop environments, EDE is much faster and smaller in memory space (EDE's window manager use less memory than xterm).

GNU/Linux Desktop: The Case Against Running Windows Apps

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement.earthweb.com: Does GNU/Linux need to run Windows apps? This question resurfaced last week, when the media noticed that Google has been contributing heavily to the Wine project, which develops a compatibility layer on GNU/Linux for running Windows applications.

GNOME Foundation Announces Program to Sponsor Accessibility Projects

Filed under
Software

gnome.org (pr): The GNOME Foundation is running an accessibility outreach program, offering USD$50,000 to be split among individuals. This program will promote software accessibility awareness among the GNOME community as well as harden and improve the overall quality of the GNOME accessibility offering.

Use Kaffeine to receive free-to-air TV on your Linux box

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: Free-to-air (FTA) ethnic television in a variety of languages beamed from satellite straight to your Linux PC? No problem -- here's how.

Ubuntu tops desktop, server Linux enthusiast poll

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.com.au: Ubuntu is the favourite distribution of Linux for use on both desktops and servers, according to a poll of Australian open source enthusiasts.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

Development News

  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP. Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.
  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise. This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does. It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library. Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.