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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 22 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

OOXML Leaked: The Stuff ISO Doesn’t Want You to Have

Filed under
OSS

boycottnovell.com: In light of the systematic abuse and the demise of ISO, which IBM loudly protested against [1, 2], we shall no longer let this process remain secretive. We finally have complete copies of the documents which the shenanigans keep behind passwords (unlike ODF which they attack). This includes 6 files, namely:

50 significant moments from internet history

Filed under
Web

zdnet.com.au: We decided to plough the history of the entire internet, from the roots of its underlying technology, to the Web properties that helped it explode, the litigation it endured on the way and disasters companies have suffered as a result of the Net's popularity. We've picked 50 of what we think are the most significant moments.

What I wish I'd read months ago about KDE3 vs. KDE4

This could have saved me (and probably others) a lot of public freaking out.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Mastering IPTables, Part I

  • FSF high priority list becomes a campaign, seeks donations
  • When Linux does well: the e1000e Ethernet bug fixed
  • Developing with libyui/libzypp & python - part3
  • A Minor Stumble with Ubuntu
  • Microsoft changes the Managed Extensibility Framework License
  • Sistine: A sify broadband client
  • Perens new crusade is patent law
  • Macs now have 8% of computer market
  • Bubba Two: The little server that could
  • Handy wallpaper for basic linux commands
  • Rwanda: Kagame Launches One Laptop Per Child
  • Application servers that developers love
  • Red Hat Delivers First Integrated Linux-Based High Performance Computing Platform
  • Red Hat Hosts Fourth Annual Government Users and Developers Conference
  • Mr. Clean actor dies at 92

Apple may mix up netbooks, Linux still looks good

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.the451group: There are some indications that yes, indeed, Linux netbooks may have to fear Apple Netbooks. They should. While I’m bullish on the opportunity for netbooks that are based on Linux, that is based partly on the fact that Linux faces really only one competitor, which is actually a ‘retired’ OS (Windows XP). An Apple netbook with iPhone-like connectivity and touch functionality would be formidable.

Notice of discontinuation of Mandriva Linux 2007.1

Filed under
MDV

linuxcompatible.org: "It's that time of year again. With the pending release of Mandriva Linux 2009.0, older versions of Mandriva Linux will no longer be supported.

why Thunar is the best file manager

Filed under
Software

lapubell.com: I have been a long time KDE supporter, and I still love the flexibility it provides. While I find both the GTK and QT toolkits to provide a pleasing look and feel to my desktop, I haven’t found a file manager that can handle my level of customization.

Funtoo Updates

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.funtoo.org: Per request on this blog, I am now building ~pentium4 Funtoo (unstable) stages. Starting with the October 1st ~x86 build, all Funtoo (unstable) stage3 builds now include dhcpcd and git.

Ubuntu 8.10 Beta Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: The beta version of the upcoming Ubuntu 8.10 (codename Intrepid Ibex), which is scheduled for release in late October this year, arrived a few minutes ago and, as usual, we intend to keep you up-to-date with the latest changes in the Ubuntu 8.10 development.

coupla shorts

Filed under
Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Setting up 2 IP address on "One" NIC (Redhat/Fedora)

  • Speeding up SpamAssassin rule processing on Debian and Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Ctrl+Alt+Delete (CAD) Key Sequence
  • Project management over the Web with Collabtive
  • Differences between Packet and Statefull Firewalls
  • Linux Package Manager Cheatsheet
  • KDE4: Resolving the "call to lnusertemp failed" issue
  • This isn’t your grandpappy’s dd command

How often do we need GNU/Linux releases?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Of what use is an operating system if all it does is to make you look forward to the next release - simply because umpteen bugs have been introduced by all the new features in the current version?

HP 2133 Mini-Note broken by own updates

Filed under
Hardware
SUSE

venturecake.com: We’ve recently been casting our eye over HP’s 2133 Mini-Note. We thought we’d check out reports on how Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop performs on the beast. Generally quite well, it seems - with one exception.

Interview with Linux guru Vincent Danen

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

blogs.techrepublic.com: In this Inside TechRepublic podcast, Sonja Thompson talks to Vincent Danen, one of TechRepublic’s Linux gurus and long-time newsletter tip contributors.

Broadcom Switches to the Light Side: The Start of a New Era?

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

workswithu.com: As anyone familiar with the Linux wireless scene before 2006 knows, Broadcom, which manufacturers the wireless chipsets found in many laptops, was for a long time synonymous with everything evil about closed-source software. That’s changing. Here’s how.

5 GIMP Tricks Everyone Should Know

Filed under
GIMP
HowTos

helpforlinux.blogspot: Having used both GIMP and Adobe Photoshop I must say I personally believe GIMP is much better for common folks like you and me. I decided to make this tutorial for those who still haven't discovered the magic of GIMP and don't know how to use GIMP productively.

Is the end near for independent open source?

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: I worry for Red Hat. As I wrote the other day, if Red Hat's stock continues to tumble it becomes ripe for an Oracle acquisition. Losing Red Hat as an independent open-source vendor would effectively call an end to open source as a standalone software strategy.

Linux Rooted in Fiction: ParanoidLinux

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: If the fact that this Linux distribution (now in an "alpha-alpha stage") is based on a work of science fiction isn't unsettling, consider two key peripheral issues.

Is Microsoft trying to take control of ODF?

Filed under
Microsoft

heise-online.co.uk: After a recent meeting of the SC 34 committee, the ISO/IEC group responsible for OOXML, Groklaw are reporting that they believe Microsoft are trying to take control of the Open Document Format (ODF), the uncontroversial open document format standard.

Intel Provides Temporary e1000e Fix

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Last night Intel folks posted a patch protecting the card (marking the memory read only, and disabling the possibility to set it read/write until next reboot). That means that it's now much safer to use e1000e with this patch applied than disabling it.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.10-rc5

Things seem to be calming down a bit, and everything looks nominal. There's only been about 250 changes (not counting merges) in the last week, and the diffstat touches less than 300 files (with drivers and architecture updates being the bulk, but there's tooling, networking and filesystems in there too). Read more Also: Linus Torvalds Announces Fifth Linux 4.10 Kernel RC, Everything Looks Nominal Linux 4.10-rc5 Released, Now Codenamed "Anniversary Edition"

Fedora 26 Linux to Enable TRIM for Better Performance of Encrypted SSD Disks

According to the Fedora 26 release schedule, the upcoming operating system is approaching an important milestone, namely the proposal submission deadline for system-wide changes, which is currently set for January 31. Read more Also: Fedora 26 Planning To Enable TRIM/Discard On Encrypted Disks

New CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Linux Kernel Security Updates Pushed Into Beta

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is informing users of the CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 enterprise-ready operating systems to upgrade their kernel packages immediately if they are using the Beta channel. Read more

KDE Neon Installer

  • KDE Neon Has Stylish New Install Wizard
    KDE Neon has adopted distro-agnostic Linux installer ‘Calamares’ its unstable developer edition. Calamares replaces the Canonical-developed Ubiquity installer as the default graphical installer used when installing the Ubuntu-based OS on a new machine. The stylish install wizard is already in use on a number of other KDE-based Linux distributions, including Chakra Linux and Netrunner.
  • KDE neon Inaugurated with Calamares Installer
    You voted for change and today we’re bringing change. Today we give back the installer to the people. Today Calamares 3 was released. It’s been a long standing wish of KDE neon to switch to the Calamares installer. Calamares is a distro independent installer used by various projects such as Netrunner and Tanglu. It’s written in Qt and KDE Frameworks and has modules in C++ or Python.