Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 17 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat unveils enterprise mobility strategy Rianne Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 9:02am
Story Google Makes Open Source Tablet To Help Doctors Fight Ebola Rianne Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 8:54am
Story Raspberry Pi 2: Ubuntu MATE 15.04 v Raspbian Rianne Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 8:48am
Story The Demise of Open Source Hosting Providers Codehaus and Google Code Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2015 - 9:42pm
Story Telco sector OPNFV project champions open network services Rianne Schestowitz 22/03/2015 - 9:35pm
Story User reviews: Applications provided by Jolla Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2015 - 9:00pm
Story A Look At BCache vs. LVM Cache For HDD+SSD Linux Systems Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2015 - 8:05pm
Story 101 Open Source Tools for Developers Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2015 - 7:54pm
Story 4MLinux 11.1 Allinone Edition FINAL released. Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2015 - 7:50pm
Story Manjaro KDE 0.9.0-pre5 edition released Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2015 - 7:48pm

Good karma

Filed under
Ubuntu

kdedevelopers.org: This weekend I visited my parents in law. I noticed that the laptop they use was still running Kubuntu Feisty with OpenOffice 2.2. So in a slightly reckless move I decided to update the machine to the next Kubuntu.

NetworkManager

Filed under
Software

invalidmagic.wordpress: network management on linux differs from distro to distro. trying various of these i liked what SuSE did over the year. they included a network manager like applet ‘knetwork’ with kde 3 which even included isdn (ppp) links. but NM does a very bad job if things don’t work. there is no debugging possible.

Build Your Own City In Real-Time Strategy Game Unknown Horizons

Filed under
Linux

Unknown Horizons is a FREE and open-source, real-time 2D strategy game for Windows and Linux. The game emphasis on economy and city building:

What's missing in Btrfs

bheekly.blogspot: So, after being completely betrayed[1] by Ext4 not once, but twice, I decided to evaluate my FS options for /home.

9 awesome features to look out for in Fedora 12

Filed under
Linux

digitizor.com: Fedora 12 which is scheduled to debut this November has some of the best features ever. Like all it’s previous releases, Fedora has always included cutting edge technologies. In this article we will have a look at 9 awesome features that Fedora 12 has.

Perceptions Against F/OSS

Filed under
OSS

everyjoe.com: Some people I know are closed-minded when it comes to using free and open source software. All of its flaws are magnified. None of the good things seem to stick in their minds.

Unknown Horizons is a free, open-source RTS for Settlers fans

Filed under
Gaming

downloadsquad.com: Time for a little open-source RTS fun with Unknown Horizons! Though it claims to be a clone of the Anno series by Sunflowers/Ubisoft, you will probably associate this game more with the Settlers games -- a very popular, age-old series of 2D real-time simulation games.

Why I Use Linux

Filed under
Linux

betyourlife.blogspot: I have recently been accused of being a tight-fisted Scotsman who would rather use a free (and presumably, by implication, inferior) product than pay for Microsoft Windows. Not only that, I've been accused of being excessively anti-Microsoft and their products while praising the virtues of Linux.

Ubuntu is Prime Time for your Business Desktop and Notebook

Filed under
Ubuntu

bigsurpowerdown.org: As a business consultant, web designer and photographer my technical know-how around doing system administration on my Microsoft desktop is limited and sometimes I do require the assistant of my computer engineering son to get it right. Now an established Linux user, I can clearly profess the capabilities and benefits of Linux for small and large businesses, especially, when it comes to notebook deployment.

KDE at Ontario Linux Fest

Filed under
KDE

my.opera.com: What a day it was! So many people are curious about KDE4, and KDE in general. So many are eager to give it a[nother] shot. My throat hurts from all the explaining, demonstrating, screaming and laughing.

Why desktop market share shouldn’t be Linux’s priority

Filed under
Linux

softvision.wordpress: During the time in which I’ve followed Linux development and its various distributions, every year I come across several articles on “Why 200X will be the year of the Linux Desktop“. Every time I read those posts, I have just one reply in mind – “It’s not going to happen”.

Symbian kernel Open Source release and Tanenbaum

Filed under
OSS

gnumonks.org: There's a difference between releasing software under a FOSS license and running a successful FOSS project. The latter involves a sufficiently large community of developers, ways how they can contribute, ...

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Chromium Rocks
  • Happy Birthday PCLinuxOS
  • “Linux” support
  • Upstart in Ubuntu 9.10
  • Hudzilla Coding Academy: Assignment Two
  • Ding Dong, The Wicked Vista's DEAD!
  • It's official: we love Windows 7
  • Windows 7 Vodka and the Microsoft Hangover
  • Working together
  • Sabayon FDC09 photos! Here they are!
  • Why XBMC is the best thing on TV
  • Imagination – A lightweight and simple DVD Slideshow Maker
  • FLOSS Weekly 92: MakerBot
  • Meet The Gimp - Episode 124: PS Translation Service

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install a software that comes in a tar.gz package in Linux?
  • Setting IO Scheduler for Maximum Performance on OpenSuSe Linux
  • Encrypt-Decrypt file using OpenSSL
  • How to install Windows 7 and Ubuntu side by side
  • How To Safely Uninstall Ubuntu From A Windows Dual-Boot Environment
  • SheevaPlug Kernel and Gentoo binhost
  • Install Postfix for reliable email delivery
  • Offline Package Management for APT
  • karmic and log rotation
  • Using vSphere Client on Ubuntu Linux with Single Application RDP
  • Axel – ultimate download accelerator for Linux that actually works
  • If Apache mod_rewrite isn’t working…

Create Greetings Using Kreeting Kard

Filed under
Software

everyjoe.com: Wondering how on earth to create a quick greeting card or postcard without having to go through using Scribus or some other software? I grew up in the 80s so I was used to Print Master. Unfortunately I haven’t found anything like this yet. So far, the only one I saw that’s close enough is Kreeting Kard.

Akonadi goes Web2.0

steveire.wordpress: At the recent Akonadi sprint, I decided to spend some time putting together a proof of concept for a web client for Akonadi. Here’s a screencast of the result:

GNU/Linux Security: Linux House vs Microsoft House

blog.eracc.com: This is the second article in my series about GNU/Linux security for the GNU/Linux curious and new GNU/Linux user.

Linux Friendly Audiobooks

berkeleylug.com: When people first think of getting audiobooks online, they probably think of Audible. But, Audible has one really big problem: DRM (Digital Rights Management). There is no application for Linux to play Audible audiobooks, and Android devices don’t support playing Audible files (yet anyway) either. Do not despair, though.

An Amazing Coincidence or Something More Sinister?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

ever-increasing-entropy.blogspot: Yesterday, as anyone involved in computing knows, Windows 7 was released by Microsoft with much marketing hype and fanfare. Canonical chose the day to announce the release candidate of their upcoming Ubuntu Linux 9.10. Hewlett-Packard also did something yesterday, albeit very quietly.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: Google, Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), Quad9 and More

  • Google investigators find hackers swipe nearly 250,000 passwords a week
    Hackers are constantly trying to break into Google accounts, so Google researchers spent a year tracing how hackers steal passwords and expose them on the internet's black market. To gather hard evidence about the tools hackers use to swipe passwords, Google collaborated with University of California Berkeley cybersecurity experts to track activity on some of these markets. On Thursday, they published their results.
  • Time Will Tell if the New Vulnerabilities Equities Process Is a Step Forward for Transparency
    The White House has released a new and apparently improved Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), showing signs that there will be more transparency into the government’s knowledge and use of zero day vulnerabilities. In recent years, the U.S. intelligence community has faced questions about whether it “stockpiles” vulnerabilities rather than disclosing them to affected companies or organizations, and this scrutiny has only ramped up after groups like the Shadow Brokers have leaked powerful government exploits. According to White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Rob Joyce, the form of yesterday’s release and the revised policy itself are intended to highlight the government’s commitment to transparency because it’s “the right thing to do.”
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Quad9 Secure DNS Service Embeds IBM Security Intelligence
  • New “Quad9” DNS service blocks malicious domains for everyone
    The Global Cyber Alliance (GCA)—an organization founded by law enforcement and research organizations to help reduce cyber-crime—has partnered with IBM and Packet Clearing House to launch a free public Domain Name Service system. That system is intended to block domains associated with botnets, phishing attacks, and other malicious Internet hosts—primarily targeted at organizations that don't run their own DNS blacklisting and whitelisting services. Called Quad9 (after the 9.9.9.9 Internet Protocol address the service has obtained), the service works like any other public DNS server (such as Google's), except that it won't return name resolutions for sites that are identified via threat feeds the service aggregates daily.
  • The Internet of Shit is so manifestly insecure that people are staying away from it in droves
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • [Ubuntu] Security Team Weekly Summary: November 16, 2017
  • Hacking Blockchain with Smart Contracts to Control a Botnet
    Blockchain has been hailed by some in the technology industry as a potential method to help improve cyber security. However, security researcher Majid Malaika warns that Blockchain can potentially be abused to enable a new form of botnet that would be very difficult to take down. Malaika detailed his Blockchain-powered botnet in a session at the SecTor security conference on Nov. 15. The overall attack method has been dubbed "Botract" by Malaika, as it abuses inherent functionality in the smart contracts that help to enable Blockchain.
  • What Can The Philosophy of Unix Teach Us About Security?

Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

  • R600 Gallium3D Shader Image Support Lands, Other R600g Patches Pending
    As a follow-up to OpenGL 4.2 Support Could Soon Land For AMD Cayman GPUs On R600g, the patches have landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git! Plus other R600g patches are on the mailing list for review. These shader image support patches for R600g expose OpenGL's ARB_shader_image_size and ARB_shader_image_load_store for Radeon HD 5000/6000 series. In the process, this ends up taking Radeon HD 6900 "Cayman" GPUs to having OpenGL 4.2 compliance from 4.1 with the shader image support having been the last blocker. Other GPUs on R600g remain at OpenGL 3.3 due to lacking FP64 support, as outlined more extensively in that previous article.
  • GeForce GTX 900 Series Re-Clocking Patches Updated By Karol Herbst
    Frequent Nouveau open-source NVIDIA driver contributor Karol Herbst has posted his latest patch series in working towards GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell 2" graphics processor re-clocking.
  • 25 More AMDGPU DC Patches, Mostly Focused On Raven DCN
    DCN in this context is for current the DCN 1.0 Raven Ridge family of display engines. The just-launched Vega+Zen APUs feature a new display engine and that's what this DCN code is for, which is also under a separate Kconfig tunable from the rest of AMDGPU DC.

Development of Linux 4.15

  • Broadcom Hurricane 2 & Allwinner R40 Supported By Linux 4.15
    More ARM platform upstreaming has taken place for the Linux 4.15 kernel development cycle among other ARM hardware improvements.
  • Intel Coffee Lake & Cannonlake Thermal Support In Linux 4.15
    While Intel Coffee Lake hardware is shipping already, a few bits of tardy kernel code for these "8th Gen Core" CPUs is only hitting the Linux 4.15 kernel. The Intel DRM driver is most notably enabling Coffee Lake graphics by default in 4.15, but there's also some thermal code now landing among other changes now happening. Zhang Rui sent in the thermal updates for Linux 4.15 on Thursday and they include late additions for Coffee Lake but at the same time the relevant additions for Cannonlake that will be shipping in 2018 as the next-gen Intel CPUs.
  • AMDGPU DC Pull Request Submitted For Linux 4.15 Kernel - 132,395 Lines Of Code
    One day after submitting the main DRM feature pull request for Linux 4.15, David Airlie of Red Hat has submitted the secondary pull request that would feature the long-awaited introduction of AMDGPU DC into the mainline kernel.

Tizen News: Knox, YouTube, Financial Apps