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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NVIDIA Releases Massive Stable Driver, Brings Support for Latest Kernels and X.org Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:31pm
Story Manjaro XFCE 0.9.0-pre1 edition released Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:23pm
Story Linux 3.19-rc5 Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:11pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 9:04pm
Story Handheld Linux Terminal Gets an A+ Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:33pm
Story Asynchronous Device/Driver Probing For The Linux Kernel Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:31pm
Story First ownCloud lustrum Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:24pm
Story Dear Computer Makers: I Want an Ubuntu Notebook! Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 7:59pm
Story Linus Torvalds and the cults of niceness and diversity Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:56am
Story GNU LibreJS 6.0.8 released Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:48am

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using multiple window managers with nested Xserver

  • How to set up sound in Slackware
  • How to open files as root user via right click
  • How to make Conky play nicely with KDE 4.3
  • Hosting Mercurial Repositories with Nginx
  • Tweeting from the Commandline with curl
  • Tech Tip: Retrieve Disk Info from the Command Line
  • Command Line Basics: Determine File MIME Types
  • How to do cartoon-like effects in GIMP?
  • Bittorrent banned from Antarctica, and boy, are the penguins pissed
  • Determining which nic is which ethX
  • Howto Change Notification Colors in Ubuntu Jaunty

Surfing Since 1991: The Evolution of Web Browsers

Filed under
Software

maximumpc.com: In order to surf the web, you need a web browser, and today there are several different ones to choose from. No matter which browser you choose to surf the web with, the features you take for granted today are the result of nearly two decades of browser design.

Which netbook OS is right for you?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Windows 7 is here, and unlike Windows Vista, it will probably run on your diminutive netbook PC. However, there is an alternative. Here is why you ought to give Linux a shot.

FUDCon Toronto 2009

Filed under
Linux

If Moonlight is so hot, why isn't Novell using it?

Filed under
SUSE

itwire.com: When a company announces a technology release, the least one would expect is that the company itself has found said technology worthy of use.

Red Hat CEO Likens Company to Facebook, Wikipedia in Collaborative Innovation

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: Jim Whitehurst says that Red Hat is "defining a whole new business model... Open source is nothing but a specific instance of the power of participation. It's applying the power of participation as Facebook or Wikipedia do, specific to computer source code."

Linux vendor revenue $1 billion by 2012? Or is it $49 billion+ ?

Filed under
Linux

blog.internetnews.com: IDC is out with a new report forecasting Linux revenue from 2009-2013. According to a post on the data, from Novell CMO John Dragoon, in 2008, the Linux vendor community saw a 23.4 percent growth in revenue.

Drizzle for Christmas - year-end-prediction for MySQL fork

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: A production ready version of the MySQL fork Drizzle could be ready by the end of this year.

SUSE Studio Review

Filed under
SUSE

Linux's Desktop Growing Pains

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: It's long past time to stop talking about Linux as the hotshot new upstart, and to demand the same things from it as any other environment. That means no more excuses about what's to come, but results right now -- especially on the desktop.

Moonlight 2 arrives and falls flat on its face

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: The other day, Novell's Mono Project, announced the beta release of Moonlight 2. IN theory, this enables Linux users to watch Microsoft Silverlight encoded content. Of course, that begs the question: "What Silverlight content?"

Open Source Likes Green IT

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: For years now, there's been talk brewing about the concept of Green IT. Pundits have predicted in years past that sustainable IT would be "job one" soon--really soon. So where does open source software fit into the mix? How green is the GPL? Pretty green, if you ask me. In fact, companies that already use open source software are well on the way to greening their IT departments.

CentOS users remain faithful despite developer shakeup

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Administrators using CentOS, the free open source operating system built on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, remain confident about the long-term stability of the OS, despite a recent shakeup prompted by the seeming disappearance of a CentOS administrator and co-founder.

Open Source for America Welcomes The Linux Box as Latest Member in Advocating Open Source in the U.S. Federal Government

Filed under
Linux

Joining a broad cross-section of more than 1,000 companies, academic institutions, communities, related groups and individuals, The Linux Box is now part of Open Source for America, a unified voice for the promotion of open source in the U.S. Federal government sector.

Most Popular Open Source Non-Linux Based Operating Systems

Filed under
OS

pluggd.in: Whenever you mention the phrase Open Source, most people think of Linux. Such is it’s popularity that even people not familiar with open source software have still heard of this mystical, geeky “software” called Linux. I think there is far more to Open Source than Linux.

OpenOffice.org and the 'Ribbons' Interface Brouhaha

Filed under
OOo

earthweb.com: Two weeks ago Project Renaissance unveiled its first prototype. The prototype resembled the Ribbon interface first introduced in Microsoft Office 2007, and the denunciations came so fast that few bothered to check the facts, or to give the idea any serious consideration.

6 Things all prospective Ubuntu Linux users should know

Filed under
Ubuntu

sinaisix.blogspot: If you have heard about Ubuntu but are still doubting whether to migrate to it or not, then the following six basic points should help you decide.

Ubuntu 9.10 vs Windows 7: No Ordinary October Showdown

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Canonical’s Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) and Microsoft’s Windows 7 are expected to debut within days of one another in October 2009. Some open source pundits will surely hype a showdown between the two operating systems.

Showdown: Fedora 11 vs Mandriva 2009.1

Filed under
Linux
MDV

thelinuxexperiment.com: After a couple of weeks of research I have finally narrowed down my choice to either Fedora 11 or Mandriva 2009.1 to use during the course of this experiment. The two distros are both very mature and feature rich which makes this choice extraordinarily difficult.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.