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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Story Raspberry Pi’s Eben Upton: Open Source Lessons from Wayland srlinuxx 29/07/2013 - 5:44pm
Story Rikomagic Linux ARM Mini PCs Launching Soon srlinuxx 29/07/2013 - 5:43pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 518 srlinuxx 29/07/2013 - 4:08pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 29/07/2013 - 2:10am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 27/07/2013 - 9:57pm
Story A Review of Open TTD for Linux srlinuxx 27/07/2013 - 2:42am
Story Review: Gratuitous Space Battles srlinuxx 27/07/2013 - 2:40am
Story OpenMandriva.org Suffers Outage, Restored Now srlinuxx 27/07/2013 - 2:38am
Story 10 secrets to sustainable in open source communities srlinuxx 26/07/2013 - 11:18pm
Story Linux Journal Readers' Choice Awards 2013 Nomination srlinuxx 26/07/2013 - 11:15pm

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #90

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 90 for the weeks May 4th - May 10th, 2008 is now available. In this issue we cover: Ubuntu Brainstorm Growing, Ubuntu Featured on Italian TV, submit questions for Launchpad podcast, Forums News and Interviews, Ubuntu UK Podcast Episode 5, and much more.

Debian Weekly News - May 9th, 2008

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Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's 2nd issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. While visiting Stefano Zacchiroli the www 2008 conference in china Sir Tim Berners-Lee offered Debian kudos for its well thought-out encapsulation/packaging of libraries. Paul Wise will close his Debian user and Debian new contributor surveys on June 1st so that analysis of the results can begin.

Python with a modular IDE (Vim)

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Software

blog.sontek.net: On Thursday, May 9th, 2008 the Utah Python User Group decided to settle the debate that has plagued us developers since the beginning of time: If you were a programming language, what editor would you use?

Grandmom’s guide to Ubuntu: Hardy Heron ate my mp3’s

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Ubuntu

bloggernews.net: Well, it’s time to update the Linux. The latest update is Hardy Heron. Computer people like cute names, and each Linux/ubuntu update has an animal name to identify it. Hardy Heron, gutsy Gibbon, etc.

Replacing Nautilus with quicker and faster PCMan File Manager in Ubuntu 8.04

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Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: In this article i discuss PCMan File Manger which is a lightweight alternative to nautilus and how to set various menus in Ubuntu to using PCMan File manager instead of using nautilus.

Why we love Ubuntu Linux (or maybe we don't)

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Ubuntu

itwire.com: With Ubuntu 8.04 now on the streets, it’s time to catch a breather and reflect on just why Ubuntu gets all the hype. Why is Ubuntu the hottest brand in Linuxdom at this time? Why is it the distro most frequently advocated? I posed these questions to readers and LUG members; here’s the feedback from real-life Linux users.

What's in a Color?

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Ubuntu

on-being-open.blogspot: I just read an interesting post over at Linux.com by someone named Susan Linton. Titled "Review: Hardy Heron converts an Ubuntu skeptic", the article has some interesting things to add to the discussion about Linux's readiness to be ones only desktop operating system. But in one case it left me feeling rather ... well... cold I guess.

VirtualBox

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Software

meandubuntu.wordpress: In my continuing quest to both try new things in general, and try new things that will help me be more productive, I recently set up VirtualBox.

How Microsoft Uses Open Against Open

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Microsoft

opendotdotdot.blogspot: To my shame, Peter Murray-Rust put up a reply to my post below in just a few hours. It shows that even such a key defender of openness as Peter finds he "needs an MS OS on my machine because it makes it easier to use tools such as LiveMeeting.

OOXML outreach to Blender

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OSS

groklaw: Microsoft has just approached the Blender guys, and I would assume have or will approach other FOSS projects since we learn that Microsoft has assigned a guy to work with Open Source projects, with a request for information on how to make Blender run better on Windows.

AbiWord - an Alternative Word Processor

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Software

fosswire.com: OpenOffice.org is generally considered the flagship of productivity programs in the open source world, but it’s not the only choice. I’ve looked at alternative word processor AbiWord previously, in a round-up of many different alternatives to OOo, but today I want to look at it in a lot more detail.

openSUSE 11.0: Qt Package Manager Improvements

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SUSE

kdedevelopers.org: Just want to point out four improvements of the YaST Qt package selector in the upcoming openSUSE 11.0 that were missing too long, much requested (at least by me) and now added:

Interview with C.S. Lee, creator of HeX

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Interviews

securitydistro.com: As the SecurityDistro team adds live security distributions to our list, we like to take things one step further and get to know the developers behind the distribution. This gives us insight into what they see coming in the months ahead and a little information on themselves.

Torrent Applications On Ubuntu

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Software

dhruvasagar.com: I have now mostly moved to Ubuntu, today I will elaborate and discuss a bit on my experience of the transition from Windows to Ubuntu and I’ll be targeting Torrent Applications specifically.

Ubuntu in Vermist

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Ubuntu

n00.be: In today’s episode of spot the operating system we present to you the Belgian movie Vermist where police detectives apparently use Ubuntu as their operating system of choice.

Compiz Fusion On Mandriva One 2008.1 Spring (GNOME/NVIDIA)

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MDV
HowTos

This document describes how to enable and configure Compiz Fusion on a Mandriva One 2008.1 Spring GNOME desktop with an NVIDIA graphics card.

A Word in Your Ear

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OSS

opendotdotdot.blogspot: A little while back I gave Peter Murray-Rust a hard time for daring to suggest that OOXML might be acceptable for archiving purposes. There are two issues here.

What to expect from Ubuntu 8.10

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Ubuntu

tectonic.co.za: With the release of Ubuntu Hardy Heron now behind us, most eyes are turned to October when Intrepid Ibex, or Ubuntu Linux 8.10, will make its debut. While Hardy Heron was designed to be stable enough to be a long-term support release, Intrepid Ibex promises to be packed with more exciting features, something that Ubuntu fans always enjoy.

Book Review: Perl by Example, 4th Edition

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Reviews

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Perl is an amazingly powerful and succinct language. Although not the most fashionable, Perl is consistent and supported on a vast range of platforms. Perl by Example written by Ellie Quigley and published by Prentice Hall is a comprehensive, example based, and thorough book.

Hidden Linux : Other worlds

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.pcworld: If you've installed Ubuntu (or Kubuntu or Xubuntu or Edubuntu or Gobuntu) and are wondering what those other desktops are like, there's an easy way to find out. No, I don't mean download, burn and boot the respective CDs. I mean just add 'em to your current configuration.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more

nginx

Case in point: I've been using the Apache HTTP server for many years now. Indeed, you could say that I've been using Apache since before it was even called "Apache"—what started as the original NCSA HTTP server, and then the patched server that some enterprising open-source developers distributed, and finally the Apache Foundation-backed open-source colossus that everyone recognizes, and even relies on, today—doing much more than just producing HTTP servers. Apache's genius was its modularity. You could, with minimal effort, configure Apache to use a custom configuration of modules. If you wanted to have a full-featured server with tons of debugging and diagnostics, you could do that. If you wanted to have high-level languages, such as Perl and Tcl, embedded inside your server for high-speed Web applications, you could do that. If you needed the ability to match, analyze and rewrite every part of an HTTP transaction, you could do that, with mod_rewrite. And of course, there were third-party modules as well. Read more

Linux and Open Source Hardware for IoT

Most of the new 21 open source software projects for IoT that we examined last week listed Linux hacker boards as their prime development platforms. This week, we’ll look at open source and developer-friendly Linux hardware for building Internet of Things devices, from simple microcontroller-based technology to Linux-based boards. In recent years, it’s become hard to find an embedded board that isn’t marketing with the IoT label. Yet, the overused term is best suited for boards with low prices, small footprints, low power consumption, and support for wireless communications and industrial interfaces. Camera support is useful for some IoT applications, but high-end multimedia is usually counterproductive to attributes like low cost and power consumption. Read more