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Wednesday, 17 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 10:00pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 9:59pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 9:58pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 9:57pm
Story Mesa and Intel Roy Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 9:27pm
Story Linux Jailhouse Hypervisor 0.5 Adds x86_64 & ARMv7 Support Roy Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 9:25pm
Story Urgent Kernel Patch for Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 9:24pm
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-3.5 released Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 9:17pm
Story Get All the Ubuntu 15.04 Live CDs Into a Single ISO Image with Linux AIO Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 9:14pm
Story KDE Ships KDE Applications 15.04.1 Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2015 - 9:08pm

A Look Back At Docky in 2009

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: As with a few other of my favourite Linux applications, Docky has an incredibly insightful and focused team who hare a passion for making Docky awesome – as proven by its breathtakingly fast development speed! So, to Docky – my favourite application of 2009!

2010 - A Linux Odyssey

Filed under
Linux
  • 2010 - A Linux Odyssey
  • Open source predictions for 2010
  • 2010 as the year of Linux on the desktop – does it really matter?

The Meaning of ’su’

pthree.org: When I taught for Guru Labs, part of the students training was covering different ways of becoming the root user, such as using “su”, “sudo” and taking advantage of the wheel group. So, what does “su” mean?

GNOME needs to get its act together

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: As the year ends, it is fair to say there have been many free and open source software organisations that have made rapid strides, not merely in 2009 but right through the noughties. But one organisation badly needs to get its act together.

Linux on the cusp of 2010

Filed under
Linux

limulus.wordpress: We’re almost at 2010 and so I thought I’d revisit my 2010: The year of the Linux Desktop post. But rather than start with Linux, I want to start with Apple…

Getting Started with Arch Linux

Filed under
Linux

maketecheasier.com: As a Linux distro addict, I’ve heard of Arch many times over the years but for some reason, I’d never actually given it a shot. In particular, one aspect that’s always interested me has been Arch’s homegrown package management system, pacman. Today we’ll be finding out what Arch is all about.

Still Livin' La Vida Linux

Filed under
Linux

tuxdeluxe.org: It's been over a year since I wrote about my conversion to a Linux based digital media environment, and since it's the holiday season (or just after) I thought it was time to update the story, and describe some new Linux based devices I'm using that others might find useful.

Linux and windows people are the same

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

toolbox.com/blogs: There is a common belief propagated around the web that Linux users are a different breed of people than windows users. In the beginning of Linux history that would have been true. These days it is not.

Lenono IdeaCentre Q100

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxuser.co.uk: A low-cost nettop PC designed primarily for accessing the Internet, the Lenovo IdeaCentre Q100 is an ideal computer for knowledge workers and end-user quality assurance testing. As a primary development system, the Q100 lacks graphics power, is low on RAM, and has a slow processor.

Open source in 2009

Filed under
OSS

mybroadband.co.za: Free software made steady progress in 2009, even if it didn't have the excitement of previous years.

What Lies at the Heart of "Avatar"?

Filed under
Linux
Movies

opendotdotdot.blogspot: It takes a lot of data center horsepower to create the stunning visual effects behind blockbuster movies such as King Kong, X-Men, the Lord of the Rings trilogy and most recently, James Cameron’s $230 million Avatar.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Seven great Ubuntu applications
  • Release Early, Release Often, Adopt Slowly
  • Linux drivers for Broadcom HD Video Accelerator
  • How to install Cairo-Dock on Simply Linux 5
  • Gifts for Gamers: Some End-of-Year Recommendations, Part 3
  • Theming GNOME
  • Announcing Acire
  • Put some meat on it: Writing release announcements
  • Pixelize, create an image consisting of many small images
  • The Quandary over Open Source Support
  • Terminator – Run Multiple Terminals in a Single Window
  • What Is Ubuntu?
  • Firefox 4 slips to 2011
  • As a linux sysadmin I do care about
  • Queen Rania using Drupal, Ashley Tisdale using Drupal
  • A Dinosaur Game Is Coming To Linux
  • 2009: A breakthrough year for mobile Linux
  • Running Different OSs Inside Windows
  • MySQL Database Corruption Post Collation Issues
  • All Quiet on the CodePlex Front as 100 Day Mark Passes

Will Linux Survive the Global Economic Meltdown?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: While companies worldwide look for ways to reduce costs, shed dead weight from their labor resources and streamline their businesses, it makes me wonder if Linux will survive the global economic meltdown.

Learning is Childsplay

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: After I finished my recent articles on Teaching with Tux and Learning with Gcompris, I received a couple of suggestions from readers that I take a look at Childsplay. I spent some time looking at Childsplay and if you have small children, I think you should too.

Ubuntu 32-bit, 32-bit PAE, 64-bit Kernel Benchmarks

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Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Coming up in our forums was a testing request to compare the performance of Linux between using 32-bit, 32-bit PAE, and 64-bit kernels. We decided to compare the performance of the 32-bit, 32-bit PAE, and 64-bit kernels on a modern desktop system and here are the results.

FreeBSD Foundation end-of-year newsletter (2009)

Filed under
BSD

freebsdnews.net: Deb Goodkin announced the publication of the annual FreeBSD Foundation’s End-of-Year Newsletter (2009). Highlights include: Letter From the President, End-of-Year Fundraising Update, and New Console Driver.

Why can't we all just get along?

Filed under
OSS

linux-magazine.com: At the risk of sounding naive, I'm concerned about how members of the free and open source software (FOSS) community treat each other. No doubt in most parts of the community, people are getting things done while keeping civil. But, publicly, or when the big issues are raised, a sustained nastiness has crept into discussions over the last year or so.

10+ free, fast-booting Linux distros that aren't Chrome OS

Filed under
Linux

downloadsquad.com: Sure, Chrome OS has been all over the headlines since early December. But it might not run on your hardware and you're going to have to wait at least a year for the final version. Why bother waiting?

Open Source in 2010: Nine Predictions

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Even though this is the end of the decade only for those who can't count, retrospectives seem more common than predictions in the last days of 2009. Or maybe, after a year of recession, all the pundits are nervous about the future.

Nightshade Forks From Stellarium, Designs Open Source Software for Planetariums

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: Stellarium is a great astronomy application for helping you learn about the skies overhead, but it's aimed mainly at astronomy buffs and casual users. Nightshade is a newly-launched fork of Stellarium designed exclusively for use for planetarium, teaching, and educational settings.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Leftovers

  • This Week in Rust
    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.
  • My trip in Cuba
    Olemis Lang is one of the founders and very active in promoting open source in Cuba. We’ve had some similar experiences in running user groups (I founded the Python french one a decade ago), and were excited about sharing our experience.
  • Mozilla Files Suit Against FCC to Protect Net Neutrality
    Today, Mozilla filed a petition in federal court in Washington, DC against the Federal Communications Commission for its recent decision to overturn the 2015 Open Internet Order.

GNU: GCC 7.3 and LibrePlanet 2018 Keynote Speakers

  • GCC 7.3 Preparing For Release To Ship Spectre Patches
    GNU developers are preparing to quickly ship GCC 7.3 now in order to get out the Spectre patches, a.k.a. the compiler side bits for Retpoline with -mindirect-branch=thunk and friends. It was just this past weekend that the back-ported patches landed in GCC 7 while now GCC 7.3 is being prepared as the branch's next bug-fix point release.
  • Announcing LibrePlanet 2018 keynote speakers
    The keynote speakers for the tenth annual LibrePlanet conference will be anthropologist and author Gabriella Coleman, free software policy expert and community advocate Deb Nicholson, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) senior staff technologist Seth Schoen, and FSF founder and president Richard Stallman. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. The theme of this year's conference is Freedom. Embedded. In a society reliant on embedded systems -- in cars, digital watches, traffic lights, and even within our bodies -- how do we defend computer user freedom, protect ourselves against corporate and government surveillance, and move toward a freer world? LibrePlanet 2018 will explore these topics in sessions for all ages and experience levels.

Open Source in 3-D Printing

  • 17,000% Cost Reduction with Open Source 3D Printing: Michigan Tech Study Showcases Parametric 3D Printed Slot Die System
    We often cover the work of prolific Dr. Joshua Pearce, an Associate Professor of Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering at Michigan Technological University (Michigan Tech); he also runs the university’s Open Sustainability Technology (MOST) Research Group. Dr. Pearce, a major proponent for sustainability and open source technology, has previously taught an undergraduate engineering course on how to build open source 3D printers, and four of his former students, in an effort to promote environmental sustainability in 3D printing, launched a business to manufacture and sell recycled and biodegradable filaments.
  • Open Source 3D printing cuts cost from $4,000 to only $0.25 says new study
    Slot die coating is a means of adding a thin, uniform film of material to a substrate. It is a widely used method for the manufacturing of electronic devices – including flat screen televisions, printed electronics, lithium-ion batteries and sensors. Up until recently, slot die components were only machined from stainless steel, restricting development and making the process expensive. Now slot dies for in-lab experimental use can be made on a 3D printer at a fraction of the cost.
  • Dutch firm unveils world's first 3-D-printed propeller
    Three-dimensional (3-D) printing technology has caught the logistics world's attention for its potential to save on warehouse and shipping costs by producing items on demand at any location. In the past two years, for example, UPS Inc. announced plans to partner with software developer SAP SE to build a nationwide network of 3-D printers for use by its customers, and General Electric Co. spent nearly $600 million to buy a three-quarters stake in the German 3-D printing firm Concept Laser GmbH. Recently, transportation companies have begun turning to the same technology for another application, creating the actual hardware used in vehicles that move the freight. For instance, in late 2016, global aircraft maker Airbus S.A.S. contracted with manufacturing firm Arconic Inc. to supply 3-D printed metal parts for its commercial aircraft.

Android Leftovers