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About Tux Machines

Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A glimpse of Mandriva 2012 Alpha1 srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 5:39pm
Story The Raspberry Pi gets a turbo mode srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 5:36pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 2:19pm
Story Why am I a freetard? srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 2:02pm
Story The Linux Desktop: Not Dead, Just Broken srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 2:00pm
Story LF Announces Automotive Grade Linux Workgroup srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 3:44am
Story 80 Open Source Replacements for Audio-Video Tools srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 3:41am
Story Mandriva and Fedora Release Alphas srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 3:40am
Story Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal Beta 1 Review srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 11:48pm
Story Sabayon 10 Review: Gentoo on steroids! srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 11:43pm

Take advantage of multiple CPU cores during file compression

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: With the number of CPU cores in desktop machines moving from two to four and soon eight, the ability to execute computationally expensive tasks in parallel is becoming more important. The mgzip tools that can take advantage of multiple CPU cores during file compression, while pbzip2 uses multiple cores for both compression and decompression.

Open Source breaking barriers

Filed under
OSS

deccanherald.com: Besides the apparent commercial benefits of adapting open source approach, technology developers also appreciate the possibility of altering the software to suit their architecture.

A sad state of affairs: open source in the UK

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: I stated yesterday that open source had not been widely adopted in the UK without really backing the statement up. Fortunately SiriusIT, the UK-based open source services firm, has revamped its site with a blog entry explaining the situation with the example of open source adoption in the schools sector.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Dell Promotes Linux on the Desktop

  • Corporate Code Searching with Krugle
  • Ubuntu Developer Week - Your Shipment Of Win Has Arrived
  • Ars at SCALE: the exhibit hall
  • 451 weighs in on GPLv3
  • Mozilla offering limited live chat support for Firefox
  • Must Do Better, BECTA
  • GNU's upcoming 25-year anniversary
  • Next Up for Enterprise Open Source: Nexenta?
  • The long tail of open source

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HowTo Create an IPv6 over IPv4 Tunnel to Reach the IPv6 Internet

  • Ping IPv6 IP Address With ping6 Command
  • HowTo Fix vmsplice Local Root Exploit in Gentoo Linux
  • Pimp your WordPress
  • Linux Tips: find all files of a particular size
  • Windows XP, Ubuntu, GParted & Super Grub Disk
  • Small-scale SNMP reporting
  • Ebuild 2 Overlay
  • Linux Tip No.15:IP Address Aliasing - Temporary

Group interview: a graphic view of the open hardware movement

Filed under
Hardware
Interviews

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Excitement in the Open Graphics community is quite high as it approaches its first production run of the FPGA-based “Open Graphics Development” board, known as “OGD1”. As an insider in this group, I had a unique opportunity to interview several of its members.

Apachelogger interviewed by kubuntu-de.org

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

kubuntu-de.org: Harald Sitter, also known as apachelogger, was promoted to Kubuntu MOTU not too long ago. He also works as a volunteer project manager for the Amarok project. We spoke with him about Amarok 2 and what can be expected from KDE 4 in Kubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron.

What if Ubuntu Hosted a Repository and Nobody Came?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itmanagement.earthweb: Last week, Canonical, the commercial face of the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, announced that it would be using its Partners repository to sell proprietary applications like Parallels Workstation. But, if past incarnations of the idea are any indication, then the results are likely to be disappointing at best.

First look: Firefox 3 beta 3 polishes rough edges

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla has announced the official release of the third Firefox 3 beta, which includes many user interface improvements and a handful of new features. Firefox 3 is rapidly approaching completion and much of the work that remains to be done is primarily in the category of fit and finish.

Small Linux distros: Puppy, SLAX and DSL

Filed under
Linux

polishlinux.org: Linux is really a great operating system, and probably none of you would argue with such opinion. Its features are almost endless, and with little effort and skills you can perform just any task using this OS. But the question is, what can we do when we have a really old computer?

Marble's Secrets Part III: The Earth in a Download

Filed under
Software

kdedevelopers.org: Today we'll finish our first trilogy about Marble Desktop Globe. In Part III we'll look beyond Marble's offline mode: We'll get to know how Marble fetches its data from the internet.

The Best Linux gmail Checker

Filed under
Software

thelinuxmovement.blogspot: he best Linux gmail checker is named CheckGmail. Now why am I raving about a gmail mail checker? You ask, how different can it be from the other gmail checkers, because don't they all do the same thing, notify you when you get mail?

Fluxbuntu: User-friendly Featherweight Linux?

Filed under
Linux

techthrob.com: While Linux is praised for its ability to run on older hardware, modern distributions such as [K]Ubuntu and Fedora eat up lots of disk space, memory, and processing power. Fluxbuntu's aim is to be a "lightweight, productive, agile, and efficient" operating system; this review takes a look at Fluxbuntu and whether it lives up to the challenge.

Apple iPhone camera and Linux Mint / gThumb 2.10.6

Filed under
Linux

on-being-open.blogspo: I have been on the road for a week or so, and I have been using my MacBook for most of the trip. Today I decided to use my Dell D620 running Mint 4.0 at the office and I was surprised to see the Linux desktop ask me if I wanted to import the pictures.

Debian & APT - Why I love it

Filed under
Software

itpro.co.uk/blogs: I pretty much use Debian in favour of other linuxes because it is free, and updates are also free. Why do I personally use Debian on my home servers - the main answer is APT.

Five fun ways to use a Linux webcam

Filed under
Hardware

linux.com: So you just set up a Linux-compatible webcam. You've tested it with Kopete, and you can send images on MSN and Yahoo! Now what? Here are some fun things you can try.

Also: Get the most out of your mouse with btnx

The world ends on January 19, 2038: thanks Unix!

Filed under
Linux

linuxlove.org: While no significant computer failures occurred when the clocks rolled over into 2000, this might not be the case with the Y2K38 bug. Even if this problem only affects Unix-like operating systems, if true, will be enough to cause massive disruption to the computer world and real world alike, as we know them.

How to Create a Desktop Linux Monopoly

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement.earthweb: What if I told you that it would actually be possible to see a Linux monopoly with the right components in place taking form within a short five-year period? That would be impossible due to licensing and availability, right? Nonsense.

Eight Distros a Week: Fluxbuntu 7.10

Filed under
Linux

larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: Take the massively popular and versatile Ubuntu distro and minimize the impact on system resources so newer machines are raised to a higher level of performance while older machines can utilize it. What would you call it? Fluxbuntu.

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Opensuse 11: Alpha 2 with KDE 4

  • Spice up your Linux desktop with AWN
  • UPDATE: OpenSUSE 10.3 And KDE 4 Repositories
  • Accessing Linux Volumes From Windows
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