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Sunday, 26 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Cheap Intel-based Android tablets get real Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 1:19am
Story Valve Steam Machines: Now Look Forward To 2015 Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 1:12am
Story Intel: BYOD enterprise Android is OK Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 1:07am
Story Intel Partners With ARM Chip Maker Rockchip on Tablet Products Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 1:04am
Story Ubuntu Devs Work on Porting Android Apps to Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 1:02am
Story MIPS supporters form a Linaro-like collaboration Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 12:36am
Story GNOME Mutter 3.13.2 Brings HiDPI Support On Wayland Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 12:29am
Story Radxa: The $100 Quad-Core ARM Raspberry Pi Alternative Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 12:14am
Story Leftovers: Software and Games Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:48pm

Why do netbook vendors make their own distribution?

Filed under
Linux

stormyscorner.com: The thing that's disappointing to me is that they all have their own Linux distribution. As a matter of fact, the Eee PC I talk about so much, comes with a custom version of Xandros. So why is this?

10 Linux-powered E-book Readers

Filed under
Hardware

junauza.com: Linux just keeps popping up on many of the popular gadgets that are hogging the limelight nowadays. However, there are some that don't flaunt Linux around, like the Amazon Kindle. Not that they have to, but well, allow me to do it for them here anyway.

Compiz Weekend Update

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: So, I decided to put the last few days to good use, here is a summary of what I have done so far.

Sparkle GeForce 9500GT 1GB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: We've checked out ATI's Radeon HD 4550 low-end graphics card already and found it to be a nice solution for Linux users on a budget, but how does NVIDIA's competitor contend? In this review we are looking at the NVIDIA GeForce 9500GT from Sparkle.

Red Hat opens Dubai Office

Filed under
Linux

cpilive.net: Red Hat has announced the expansion of its international presence with the opening of an office in Dubai. The new office will provide support for its growing customer base in the Middle East and Africa and enable Red Hat to leverage experts with local knowledge to meet new business demands in the region.

Non-Constructive Linux Bashing Does Require A Kevlar Suit

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: An article published in iTWire titled “Opinion: why Linux sucks at being user friendly” has been drawing a lot of attention recently. I am going to start by responding to each of the author’s points and then pointing out what I think the overall problem is.

Xubuntu 8.10 - Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-hardcore.com: I like speed and stability. To be honest I find Gnome and Kde do not live up to my perception of speed, so I choose Xfce and Fluxbox.

Choosing Your Shell

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot: In most Linux systems, your default shell is the bash shell. There are many other shells, and you can activate a different one by simply typing the new shell’s command (ksh, tcsh, csh, sh, bash, and so forth) from the current shell.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Using Your Linux Computer As A UPnP AV Server (Part 3)

  • How will Windows 7 affect Linux?
  • stats.larrythecow.org — what’s installed on your box?
  • Is Smolt the Key to Counting Linux Users?
  • Where to find royalty-free cliparts for OpenOffice.org?
  • Open Source enterprise to facilitate University Education
  • Back to the roots with Gentoo...
  • Ubuntu Podcast Episode #11
  • Ballmer’s upside down thinking on open source
  • Notes in OpenOffice.org 3.0 Writer
  • Linux print server enhances library printing
  • Supercharging a home network with Amahi
  • Open Source Software and Africa
  • Having more than 4GB of RAM on x86 Linux
  • Open Letter to Richard Stallman
  • Mepis 7.0- My Distro of Choice
  • Russia and Cuba Unite Against Microsoft
  • Gollem: A Web-based file manager for back-end data
  • Kernel tcp_output “work around” implemented for openSUSE 11.1 Beta 5
  • Origin of Famous Linux Distibutions

Desktop Linux – Will It Ever Stick?

Filed under
Linux

popsci.com: About seven years ago, I tried to free myself from the oppression and misery of running Windows ME by installing Linux on my PC. Ever installed the Linux operating system? It’s not for the faint of heart. So, when it was recently reported that Linux-based netbooks are being returned at a rate four-times higher than their Windows-based brethren, I can’t say I was surprised.

OpenNMS 1.6.0: Birthing an Elephant

Filed under
Software

blogs.opennms.org: We were finally able to release the next stable version of OpenNMS, 1.6.0, at the end of October, but I wasn’t able to write about it. Getting a new stable release out can be painful. Anyway, here’s a short overview of all the work that went in to 1.6.0.

GNOME as the computing platform for the future

Filed under
Software

stormyscorner.com: Often when people talk about open source software businesses they immediately think about companies like Jboss or MySQL. All these companies – and many more - successfully use GNOME technologies to improve their business. How does that work? What is GNOME and what about it makes it good for businesses and society?

ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 8.10 and OpenOffice.org 3.0

  • Ubuntu Special Characters
  • Why choose Ubuntu 8.10 as a server?
  • Installing Ubuntu 8.10 In 12 Easy Steps
  • Ubuntu from your flash drive - easier than ever before
  • Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex
  • 50 amazing Ubuntu time-saving tips

YaST releases independent of openSUSE releases?

Filed under
Software
SUSE

opensuse.org: YaST is one of the cornerstones of openSUSE. There never was a release of YaST independent of openSUSE. Even the versioning of YaST is tied to openSUSE. But in principle, YaST is a tool that can be used across distributions.

Why Microsoft is running scared of Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: Microsoft is frightened. Even Ballmer is telling users that they can skip Vista, which tells you everything you need to know about Vista's failure. In the past, Microsoft wouldn't have sweated this kind of flop. "What can users do?" they'd say. "Move to Linux or Macs? Ha!" That was then. This is now.

Also: Windows 7 Will Let Microsoft Track Your Every Move

The View From Firefox's Bleeding Edge

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • The View From Firefox's Bleeding Edge

  • Mozilla Firefox 3.0.4 update coming November 12
  • My Most-Useful Firefox Add-ons
  • Microsoft breaks HotMail for Linux users?

Some kinda Linux mix

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

beranger.org: If there is a distro that supports well my hardware, then it doesn't hibernate, or the provided OpenOffice.org can't load the Antidote RX plugin, or some other software is missing, or it doesn't offer GNOME, or it doesn't provide updates in a timely manner, or its developers are Nazis when comes to a particular subject, or some of the software in the repositories is broken, or the distro is supported for only about 12-13-18 months, etc. etc. Yes, I've installed Ubuntu 8.10...

Can't we all just get a distro?

Filed under
Linux

neowin.net: Its no secret that open source is a viable alternative to pay for systems such as Vista and OSX; but why has it taken until now for laptop manufactures to start shipping Linux as an option?

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 4 Initial Impressions

Filed under
SUSE

dtschmitz.com: Even if I wasn't such an openSUSE devotee, I think I might find a lot of good things to say about this Linux product. Beta 4 is almost stable enough for production use.

Linux growth: The Asus connection

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: Asustek is not a name most people know. The Taiwan-based hardware maker traditionally operates in the PC-board sector. But a few years ago the company began to make its own notebook PCs.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Major Cloudflare bug leaked sensitive data from customers’ websites
    Cloudflare revealed a serious bug in its software today that caused sensitive data like passwords, cookies, authentication tokens to spill in plaintext from its customers’ websites. The announcement is a major blow for the content delivery network, which offers enhanced security and performance for more than 5 million websites. This could have allowed anyone who noticed the error to collect a variety of very personal information that is typically encrypted or obscured.
  • SHA1 collisions make Git vulnerable to attakcs by third-parties, not just repo maintainers
    After sitting through an endless flood of headless-chicken messages on multiple media about SHA-1 being fatally broken, I thought I'd do a quick writeup about what this actually means.
  • Torvalds patches git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks
    Linux creator Linus Torvalds says two sets of patches have been posted for the distributed version control system git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks which are based on the method that Dutch and Google engineers detailed last week. The post by Torvalds detailing this came after reports emerged of the version control system used by the WebKit browser engine repository becoming corrupted after the two proof-of-concept PDF files that were released by the Dutch and Google researchers were uploaded to the repository.
  • Linus Torvalds on "SHA1 collisions found"
  • More from Torvalds on SHA1 collisions
    I thought I'd write an update on git and SHA1, since the SHA1 collision attack was so prominently in the news. Quick overview first, with more in-depth explanation below: (1) First off - the sky isn't falling. There's a big difference between using a cryptographic hash for things like security signing, and using one for generating a "content identifier" for a content-addressable system like git. (2) Secondly, the nature of this particular SHA1 attack means that it's actually pretty easy to mitigate against, and there's already been two sets of patches posted for that mitigation. (3) And finally, there's actually a reasonably straightforward transition to some other hash that won't break the world - or even old git repositories.
  • [Older] Wire’s independent security review
    Ever since Wire launched end-to-end encryption and open sourced its apps one question has consistently popped up: “Is there an independent security review available?” Well, there is now!
  • Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED
  • FCC to halt rule that protects your private data from security breaches
    The Federal Communications Commission plans to halt implementation of a privacy rule that requires ISPs to protect the security of its customers' personal information. The data security rule is part of a broader privacy rulemaking implemented under former Chairman Tom Wheeler but opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority. The privacy order's data security obligations are scheduled to take effect on March 2, but Chairman Ajit Pai wants to prevent that from happening. The data security rule requires ISPs and phone companies to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information—such as Social Security numbers, financial and health information, and Web browsing data—from theft and data breaches. "Chairman Pai is seeking to act on a request to stay this rule before it takes effect on March 2," an FCC spokesperson said in a statement to Ars.
  • Google releases details of another Windows bug
  • How to secure the IoT in your organisation: advice and best practice for securing the Internet of Things
    All of the major technology vendors are making a play in the Internet of Things space and there are few organisations that won’t benefit from collecting and analysing the vast array of new data that will be made available. But the recent Mirai botnet is just one example of the tremendous vulnerabilities that exist with unsecured access points. What are the main security considerations and best practices, then, for businesses seeking to leverage the potential of IoT?

GNOME News

  • FEDORA and GNOME at UNSAAC
    Today I did a talk to introduce students of UNSAAC to the Fedora and GNOME world as it was announced by the GDG Cusco group. We started at 8:30 am and it was a free event:
  • GNOME Theme For Firefox Gets Updated, Looking Great
    There are a lot of complete themes for Firefox. We spoke about 3 of them in one of our previous articles. The good news today is that “GNOME 3” theme (which was also called Adwaita) for Firefox was updated. Now it’s working with all versions higher than Firefox 45. Previously, the theme didn’t work with the recent versions of Firefox. So people had to switch to other available themes. Fortunately, this finally changed today when another developer took the code, fixed the compatibility problems and re-released the theme.
  • GStreamer Now Supports Multi-Threaded Scaling/Conversion For Big Performance Win
    With the addition of over two thousand lines of code, GStreamer's video-convert code within gst-plugins-base is now properly multi-threaded. Video scaling and conversion can now be multi-threaded when using GStreamer. With this multi-threading work by Sebastian Dröge, he commented with the commit, "During tests, this gave up to 1.8x speedup with 2 threads and up to 3.2x speedup with 4 threads when converting e.g. 1080p to 4k in v210."

Linux and Graphics

  • OpenRISC For Linux 4.11 Gets Some Optimizations, Prepares For SMP
    OpenRISC continues advancing with its sights on being a free and open processor for embedded systems using the RISC instruction set architecture. Last year the Linux kernel got a new OpenRISC maintainer and for Linux 4.11 there is a fair amount of interesting changes for the OpenRISC code within the mainline tree.
  • drm for v4.11 - main pull request
    The tinydrm code seems like absolute pure shit that has never seen a compiler. I'm upset, because I expect better quality control. In fact, I expect *some* qualitty control, and this piece-of-shit driver has clearly seen none at all. And those patches were apparently committed yesterday. WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK?
  • [Old] A Guide Through The Linux Sound API Jungle
    At the Audio MC at the Linux Plumbers Conference one thing became very clear: it is very difficult for programmers to figure out which audio API to use for which purpose and which API not to use when doing audio programming on Linux.
  • Mesa, Vulkan & Other Driver Talks From 2017 Embedded Linux Conference
  • Fuzzing Mesa Drivers Begin To Uncover Bugs
    Last December we wrote about work being done on fuzzing OpenGL shaders leading to wild differences with the work being done at the Imperial College London. While they were testing other drivers on different operating systems, they have now fired up tests of Mesa.
  • Wayland's Weston 2.0 Compositor Released
    Wayland 1.13 was released earlier this week but the adjoining Weston compositor update didn't happen at the same time due to some last minute changes needing more time to test, but this Friday, Weston 2.0 is now shipping. But before getting too excited, Weston 2.0 doesn't represent some break-through changes but rather was bumped away from the Wayland versioning rhythm due to its new output configuration API breaking Weston's ABI. Thus the major version bump.
  • weston 2.0.0
    Welcome to the official release of Weston 2.0. There are no changes since RC2.

today's howtos