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About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Whats New for You This August in Open Source CMS Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 6:24pm
Story Barrier to entry: Busting more myths about Linux Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 6:03pm
Story Fedora Is Considering Putting 32-bit Platform on a Backburner Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 5:50pm
Story Alpine Android Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 5:24pm
Story today's leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 4:46pm
Story Leftovers: Software and Games Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 4:29pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 4:25pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 4:25pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 4:18pm
Story Unity 8 Looking like a Proper Linux Desktop - Gallery Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 4:07pm

Linux Media Players Suck – Part 1: Rhythmbox

Filed under
Software

thelinuxexperiment.com: The state of media players on Linux is a sad one indeed. If you’re a platform enthusiast, you may want to cover your ears and scream “la-la-la-la” while reading this article, because it will likely offend your sensibilities. This article will concentrate on lambasting Rhythmbox.

The Scribes experience: It’s all about productivity

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: When a text editor’s catch phrase is “Scribes: It’s about the experience, not features.” you have to wonder what you are in for.

Kubuntu 10.04: Another Average KDE Distro

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Kubuntu 10.04: Another Average KDE Distro
  • Ubuntu: Unexpected upgrade difficulties
  • Compiz Keyboard Shortcuts in Ubuntu 10.04
  • Koala to Lynx Almost Flawless
  • Philippines 2010 Elections and Ubuntu

How To Build A Standalone File Server With Nexenta 3.0 Beta2

Filed under
HowTos

Nexenta is a project developing a debian user-land for the OpenSolaris kernel. This provides all of the advantages of apt as a package respoitory (based on the Ubuntu LTS apt repository, currently using 8.04) as well as the advantages of the ZFS filesystem. In the resulting setup every user can have his/her own home directory accessible via the SMB protocol or NFS with read-/write access.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • PCLinuxOS 2010 Enlightenment Screenshots
  • Is the Android truly open source?
  • Harnessing UML in Ubuntu
  • What Do Open Source Surveys reveal?
  • 100$ Android Tablet from China: Eken M001
  • Best Practices for Contributors: Getting Started with Linux Distro Development
  • WeakNet IV Linux, a Great Distro for Security Experts
  • Package BLOCK for Perl 5.14
  • Red Hat and Drupal Announce New Support/Training Offerings
  • KDE Priorities
  • Linux Foundation Announces LinuxCon Keynotes, Mini-Summits
  • The GNU/Linux Code of Life
  • Beef up Firefox Privacy Features
  • Pomodoro and KDE
  • Krusader Team Celebrates 10th Birthday and Seeks New Contributors

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Enable larger persistent data for Linux Live on SolidState or USB devices
  • Bg, Fg, &, Ctrl-Z – 5 Examples to Manage Unix Background Jobs
  • 16 GB encrypted candy file
  • Installing CRUX from a CD-ROM
  • Symbian development using Linux on real life
  • How to Install XAMPP on Ubuntu Linux
  • Diagnose PC Hardware Problems with an Ubuntu Live CD
  • switching from gnu screen to tmux
  • Improving battery life time in Linux
  • Browse Folders In openSUSE With Full Root Access
  • Restore Grub 2 As The Main Bootloader
  • fix function keys (FN) issue after upgrading to ubuntu 10.04
  • Hudzilla Coding Academy: Project Ten
  • How to enable a second monitor NVIDIA
  • Compiling and installing gcocoadialog in Ubuntu

Interview with Cory Fields of XBMC

Filed under
Software
Interviews

linuxjournal.com: I recently had the honor of spending time with Cory Fields, the Public / Business Relations Manger for XBMC.

Chrome VS Midori

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: Both in response to my recent review of Midori and some argument... ehm, discussion, in yesterdays Ubuntuesday OMG! Podcast, I have taken on the task of running Midori and Google Chrome through a few tests to see which one performs better and faster.

Tilting at Windows. Why rejecting Microsoft’s OSS contributions is counter-productive

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

blogs.the451group: Yesterday I had a look at the response of the Joomla! community to the news that Microsoft had signed the Joomla! Contributor Agreement and was contributing code to the content management project.

Upgrading your distro should come with a warning

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxcurmudgeon.blogspot: The upgraders, who prefer to leave their computer as is, and hit the "upgrade" button, hoping to come back to their computers in a couple hours and revel in their shiny new OS. But is the upgrade method really worth it?

No GNOME-Shell in Maverick

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Shuttleworth: No GNOME-Shell in Maverick
  • Ubuntu 10.04 – packed with goodies.
  • Canonical explains Ubuntu unfree video choice
  • Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx – Gasp What’s Wrong With ALSA ?

Osmos for Linux...prepare to be assimilated

Filed under
Gaming

linuxlock.blogspot: When Dave Burke from Hemisphere games emailed me to let me know that his game "Osmos" had been ported to Linux, it got my attention. As requested, he sent me a link to download it and give it a try. And as most always with Indie guys, it comes with no form of DRM.

Finally a graphics card for Linux that works flawlessly with compiz and is lightning fast

Filed under
Hardware

deathwing00.org: After years of struggling and looking around, I have finally found a graphics card that works flawlessly when running compiz under Linux and that processes all the effects at lightning speed. I've never seen something like this for that reasonable price!

My Wallpaper changer search

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: With the Advent of Ubuntu 10.1 I began tweaking the Os to my liking, changing the desktop, adding programs, and that sort of stuff. I was doing good until I find that wallpaper-tray is no longer supported by Ubuntu.

PCLinuxOS 2010 - Familiar taste of radical simplicity

Filed under
PCLOS

dedoimedo.com: I find PCLinuxOS to be the big small distro. While it has a modest development team, the final product has always felt quite solid and polished, beyond the normal expectations of limited resources.

Ceph: A Linux petabyte-scale distributed file system

Filed under
Linux

A recent addition to Linux's impressive selection of file systems is Ceph, a distributed file system that incorporates replication and fault tolerance while maintaining POSIX compatibility. Explore the architecture of Ceph and learn how it provides fault tolerance and simplifies the management of massive amounts of data.

KDE 4.4.3 Is Upon Us

Filed under
KDE

KDE today released the 3rd monthly update to the 4.4 series, bringing a slew of bugfixes and translation updates to our users. Konsole has seen some love, so has Okular.

Linux Brands: Desired and Distracting at the Same Time

Filed under
Linux

itworld.com: Branding first appeared on the splash screens of Linux distributions: cleverly designed logos that briefly showed the world what kind of Linux you were using, then rolled away to reveal the stock GNOME, KDE, or other window environment/manager underneath.

AMD Radeon HD 4290 On Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Last week we delivered benchmarks of the AMD Athlon II X3 425 processor running Ubuntu 10.04 LTS while this week we are continuing in benchmarks from this triple-core budget processor as we try out its gaming performance when paired with an AMD 890GX motherboard boasting integrated Radeon HD 4290 graphics.

PCLinuxOS 2010.1 KDE - Update Review

Filed under
PCLOS

cristalinux.blogspot: While I was waiting, much to my surprise, I have seen the PCLinuxOS team has released a bug fix/enhancement version of their much acclaimed PCLinuxOS 2010 KDE.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: Liberation of Code, GNU Parallel, Devhelp

  • When should you open source your software?
    It’s 20 years this this since the term ‘Open Source’ was coined. In that time the movement for free and open software has gone from a niche to a common method of distribution and a normal way of operating for businesses. Major technology shifts are now driven by open source technologies: Big Data (Hadoop, Spark), AI (TensorFlow, Caffe), and Containers (Docker, Kubernetes) are all open projects. Massive companies including Google, Facebook, and even Lyft regularly release Open Source tools for the world to use. Microsoft – whose former CEO once described Linux as a cancer – now embraces the concept.
  • GNU Parallel 20180422 ('Tiangong-1') released
    Quote of the month: Today I discovered GNU Parallel, and I don’t know what to do with all this spare time. --Ryan Booker
  • Devhelp news
    For more context, I started to contribute to Devhelp in 2015 to fix some annoying bugs (it’s an application that I use almost every day). Then I got hooked, I contributed more, became a co-maintainer last year, etc. Devhelp is a nice little project, I would like it to be better known and used more outside of GNOME development, for example for the Linux kernel now that they have a good API documentation infrastructure (it’s just a matter of generating *.devhelp2 index files alongside the HTML pages).

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

University students create award-winning open source projects

In my short time working for Clarkson University, I've realized what a huge impact this small university is making on the open source world. Our 4,300 student-strong science and technology-focused institution, located just south of the Canadian border in Potsdam, New York, hosts the Clarkson Open Source Institute (COSI), dedicated to promoting open source software and providing equipment and support for student projects. While many universities offer opportunities for students to get involved in open source projects, it's rare to have an entire institute dedicated to promoting open source development. COSI is part of Clarkson's Applied Computer Science Labs within the computer science department. It, along with the Internet Teaching Lab and the Virtual Reality Lab, is run by students (supported by faculty advisers), allowing them to gain experience in managing both facilities and projects while still undergraduates. Read more