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Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 22: The Final Countdown (and Red Hat News) Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 9:58am
Story Big Switch CTO Details SDN and Linux Plans [VIDEO] Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 9:39am
Story Fedora 23 Cinnamon Edition Proposed, Just What the Doctor Ordered Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 9:24am
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 9:13am
Story GNOME 3.16 On Fedora 22: Wayland vs. X.Org Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 9:03am
Story Rackspace: Expect more of a leadership role in OpenStack community Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 8:34am
Story How low can we go? Introducing the $9 Linux computer! Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 8:27am
Story CommunityCube: Open-source, Privacy First Server Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 8:23am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 8:17am
Story More Concept Designs for the Samsung Gear A Tizen Smart Watch Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 8:16am

Opera Software CEO steps down

Filed under
Software

mybroadband.co.za: Opera Software ASA announced Tuesday that co-founder and CEO Jon von Tetzchner has stepped down following 15 years at the helm of the Norwegian software developer.

Creating An NFS-Like Standalone Storage Server With GlusterFS On Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a standalone storage server on Ubuntu 9.10. Instead of NFS, I will use GlusterFS here. The client system will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.

The GPL Barter Cycle - A Graphic

Filed under
Linux
OSS

groklaw.net: In our efforts at Groklaw to explain the General Public License, or GPL, over the years, we've used many words. But the other day I asked if anyone could think of a way to show it graphically, and PolR has done it.

X-Plane 9 on Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • X-Plane 9 on Linux
  • Mystery of Solarus DX – Zelda Remake

Lenovo unveils IdeaPad U1 Hybrid

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

  • Lenovo unveils IdeaPad U1 Hybrid
  • Lenovo Unveils New Hybrid Tablet/Laptop and Smartbook
  • IdeaPad U1 Hybrid pairs notebook base with detachable tablet

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • XKB2 Gets Cut Again, Maybe For X Server 1.9?
  • Add-on Lets Firefox Use Ubuntu Notification System
  • Samba4 release pushed back to late 2010, 2011?
  • IBM software sticks to the plan for 2010
  • Penguin Awareness
  • openSUSE 11.2 on Dell Mini 10v
  • Open-Source BI Going Mainstream for Routine Uses
  • Linux-running Pandora game handheld nears completion
  • New Drupal Book: Drupal for Dummies
  • Zec - a client for Empire
  • 2020 Vision: Why you won't recognize the 'Net in 10 years
  • Mandriva support and updates // 2009 followup

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto Install Carwhisperer on Ubuntu
  • Quick package install wth apt
  • Synchronizing Date with NTP
  • Create a simple to use kiosk machine with Fluxbox
  • Ubucompilator - Easy way of creating .deb packages from source files
  • Fully disabling touchpad in Ubuntu
  • Designing Pages in OpenOffice.org Writer
  • Converting Maildir to mbox via mutt
  • Smoother Compiz Performance In 3 Simple Steps
  • how to use nslookup
  • Get An Animated & Themed GRUB Menu Using BURG
  • Create Custom Email Templates in KMail
  • Copying Remote Files with scp

Official Ubuntu Beginners Manual Coming With Lucid Lynx

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu wiki points out that a new complete beginners manual for Ubuntu is on it's way. The manual will include information on anything you need to know after installing Ubuntu and very useful how-to's for beginners, all written in a user-friendly way in a PDF file. [Full story]

Firefox development dilemma: Tweak or overhaul?

Filed under
Moz/FF

news.cnet.com: Mozilla is building a number of features into the upcoming Firefox 3.7 browser--but the organization now has begun stewing over whether to introduce some of them in a significant update, as planned, or to rewrite some sooner for a variation of the current browser.

Sneak Peek at Opera 10.5

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: If at first you don’t succeed, try again. Opera hasn’t cracked double digits in the desktop browser market, but that doesn’t mean the company is giving up. A few days ago, Opera released alpha builds of Opera 10.5 and made them available for download.

A comparison of virtualization features of HP-UX, Solaris, and AIX

Filed under
Linux

Most AIX administrators understand the virtualization features available to them on their System p platform through PowerVM, which is also available on the System p for Linux. What about the other UNIX hardware platforms? find out what HP-UX, Solaris have to offer and how do some of their features compare to PowerVM.

The Ultimate Distro Showdown: Ubuntu 9.10 vs openSUSE 11.2 vs Mandriva 2010

Filed under
Linux

linuxforu.com: We laid our hands on all the three biggies—Ubuntu 9.10, Mandriva 2010 and openSUSE 11.2—and pitted them against each other. What followed was the battle of the century, as each distro pulled off one unique trick after another to stay on top of the game.

What's your vision of GNOME?

Filed under
Software

stormyscorner.com: The GNOME Foundation's mission is to provide a free desktop accessible to everyone. Accessible regardless of their ability to pay, their physical ability or the language they speak.

IP STB runs Linux, supports Netflix downloads

Filed under
Linux

linuxfordevices.com: Syabas Technology has posted specs for an upcoming IP STB (set-top box) that supports streaming Netflix downloads. The UPnP-ready "Popbox" offers Ethernet, WiFi, Component video, and HDMI connections, runs embedded Linux on a MIPS-based Sigma Designs SMP8643 processor, and will ship in March for only $129.

Arora web browser review

Filed under
Software

linuxuser.co.uk: Arora is a simple and lightweight cross-platform web browser based on the WebKit web browser engine, which has a small memory footprint. It can do some things that the more sophisticated web browsers can do.

Three console audio mixers

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I mentioned byobu the other day, and a few days before I mentioned a slew of audio players for the console. Here’s a mis-mash of those ideas, with three audio mixers running inside the Ubuntu version of byobu.

Bangarang: The new KDE media player

Filed under
Software

linuxcrunch.com: Most KDE4 users know the default KDE media player Dragon player. It is simple and easy. In this post I will introduce you a new media player for KDE4 which intends to be simple in stylish way, more integration with KDE4 technologies like phonon and Nepomuk, and has more features than Dragon player. It is Banarang.

Does Debian Deviate From Standards Or Upstream?

Filed under
Linux

pthree.org: Recently, I got into a discussion with a friend of mine. The discussion was about whether or not Debian and Ubuntu have deviated from standard practice regarding Paul Vixie’s cron implementation.

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More in Tux Machines

Intel's "Utter Garbage" Code Bricks and Delays Linux, Torvalds Furious

today's leftovers

  • 20 Years of LWN
    Back in mid-1997, your editor (Jonathan Corbet) and Liz Coolbaugh were engaged in a long-running discussion on how to trade our nice, stable, reliably paying jobs for a life of uncertainty, poverty, and around-the-clock work. Not that we thought of it in those terms, naturally. We eventually settled on joining Red Hat's nascent "support partner" program; while we were waiting for it to get started, we decided to start a weekly newsletter as a side project — not big and professional like the real press — to establish ourselves in the community. Thus began an amazing journey that has just completed its 20th year. After some time thinking about what we wanted to do and arguing about formats, we published our first edition on January 22, 1998. It covered a number of topics, including the devfs controversy, the pesky 2GB file-size limit on the ext2 filesystem, the use of Linux on Alpha to render scenes in the film "Titanic", the fact that Red Hat had finally hired a full-time quality-assurance person and launched the Red Hat Advanced Development Labs, and more. We got almost no feedback on this issue, though, perhaps because we didn't tell anybody that we had created it.
  •  
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.4 | Ubuntu 17.10 Revisited
    Canonical revised Ubuntu 17.10 with the new 17.10.1. Time to take another look…
  • PodCTL #22 – Highway to Helm
    One of the reasons that Kubernetes has gained so much traction in the marketplace is because it is flexible enough to allow innovation to happen all around the core APIs. One area where that has happened is in application package management, specifically with the Helm project.
  • LibreELEC Linux OS Will Get Meltdown and Spectre Patches with Next Major Release
    The development team behind the Kodi-based LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source HTPC operating system for embedded systems and PCs released LibreELEC 8.2.3. LibreELEC 8.2.3 is the third maintenance update to the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series of the Just enough Operating System (JeOS), which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center. It's here a month after the LibreELEC 8.2.2 point release to address a few issues.
  • openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week
    The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26. The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3. “We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”
  • French Gender-Neutral Translation for Roundcube
    Here's a quick blog post to tell the world I'm now doing a French gender-neutral translation for Roundcube.
  •  
  • This Oil Major Has a Supercomputer the Size of a Soccer Field
    Big Oil is now Big Tech. So big, in fact, that Eni SpA’s new supercomputer is the size of a soccer field. In the multimillion-dollar pursuit of the world’s most powerful computers, the Italian explorer says it’s taken the lead. Its new machine, located outside Milan, will scan for oil and gas reservoirs deep below the Earth over thousands of miles. “This is where the company’s heart is, where we hold our most delicate data and proprietary technology,” Eni Chief Executive Officer Claudio Descalzi said in an interview on Thursday.

Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.