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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Kernel 3.14.31 Is Now the Most Advanced LTS Branch Available Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:25pm
Story My Week with Trojita Rianne Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:25pm
Story Simplicity Linux 15.1 Is Based on Slacko – Gallery Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:23pm
Story Open Collaboration is Paving the Path for NFV Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:19pm
Story HummingBoard-i2eX review, dual-core SBC which runs Android and Linux Rianne Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:14pm
Story Release date for Krita 2.9 Rianne Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:09pm
Story Why do some Mac owners run Linux instead of OS X? Rianne Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:03pm
Story Systemd – for better or worse Rianne Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 8:59pm
Story 2014 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 8:35pm
Story You're the Boss with UBOS Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 8:32pm

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Is there a ChromiumOS to go with ChromeOS?
  • Easily Install Fonts In Ubuntu With FontMatrix
  • Boog, the desktop bugzilla client for Fedora
  • Using GSmartControl In Ubuntu Linux
  • Get Hands on OpenSUSE at LinuxCon
  • Game Over for Sony
  • Google browser gets Sony foothold
  • Skype Dials New Owner… And Open Source
  • Lets work together.
  • Noteworthy PCLinuxOS updates (Aug 23rd – Aug 29th)
  • Ubuntu TechBoard 2009
  • Jaunty, Arch and Alsa
  • about:mozilla 9/2
  • Accelerating X with Gallium
  • SFLC Podcast: Episode 0x15: Steve Holden of Python

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HOWTO: Auto launch programs/scripts on LXDE startup
  • Use the same GTK theme for applications started as root
  • Make Ubuntu remember the applications you had open when you last logged out
  • three ways to install alsa drivers
  • A gentle routing tutorial
  • AcetoneISO: Manage CD/DVD images with ease on Ubuntu
  • Graudit – Code Audit Tool Using Grep
  • Gain more battery life from your Linux-based laptop with powertop
  • Instant Lan File Sharing with Python

5 Great opensource games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

unixmen.com: Here are 5 Nice opensource games for Linux , I installed the games on ubuntu and they did work fine, I liked more Supertux perhaps because is similar to super mario bros one my favorite games, the rest of the games are nice ones also with nice music and good graphics.

The File Menu

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: The File menu has been around since the dawn of user interfaces. But do you know what? It has overstayed its welcome. The File menu has been abused in far too many applications.

Windows And Linux Users Get Another Great VM Option

Filed under
Software

bmighty.com/blog: Parallels, Inc. is a company best known for its Mac-based virtualization software. This week, however, it finally delivered an updated version of its Windows- and Linux-based products.

4 Resources for the Powerful Inkscape Open Source Drawing Tool

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Among advanced open source graphics tools, GIMP has a lot of fans, and there are many free online resources available for it, but if you're looking for a drawing and illustration tool that can compete with Adobe Illustrator and is especially good for logos and splashy still graphics, give Inkscape a try.

Kindle DX Impressions

jonobacon.org: The Kindle. I have been wanting to buy one of these babies for a while, and when I kept reading about people buying my book on them, read Mike’s generally positive blatherings, and wanted something to read for my honeymoon last week, I gave in and bought one.

The 'Linuxification' of Windows has begun

Filed under
Linux
Software

Randall C. Kennedy, InfoWorld: It's like a cancer: a creeping, deadly disease that slowly erodes all that's good and clean, replacing it with a swill of malignancy and decrepitude. I'm speaking, of course, of the recent appearance of Linux UI conventions under Windows.

Fedora from an Ubuntu point of view

Filed under
Linux

blog.lynxworks.eu: In the interests of not becoming blinkered to one distribution, I thought I might give Fedora 11 a whirl. Not having used Fedora since FC4, I was surprised to see the adoption of a live CD installation and relieved to avoid a DVD size download. Just like Ubuntu it’s well polished, perhaps more so with graphical grub.

Grants, bounties and free software

Filed under
OSS

stormyscorner.com: The GNOME community has had mixed results with bounties and grants, so when Funambol community manager Stefano Maffulli contacted me about a GNOME grant and said they'd had success using grants for Funambol, I thought it'd be interesting to learn more about the program.

Building Linux Audio Apps 101: A User's Guide, Part 1

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linuxjournal.com: Recently I've received some mail asking for a brief explanation on how to build Linux audio applications from source code packages. Ask and ye shall receive, hence the following simple guide for the perplexed, the puzzled, and the downright mystified. Compiling software is hardly rocket science, and if an old guitar-picker like myself can do it certainly you can too.

Ubuntu Netbook Remix UI Gets Tweaked Again

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntumini.com: Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala Alpha 4 brings another Ubuntu Netbook Remix user interface redesign. The colors has been lighted, the menus now dynamically resize to allow more of the background to be seen and launcher animations have returned.

KDE 4.3.1 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: A month has passed since the release of KDE 4.3.0, so today the KDE Community announces the immediate availability of KDE 4.3.1, a bugfix, translation and maintenance update for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop.

Linux powers world's fastest stock exchange

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: The Deutsche Borse Group manages the International Securities Exchange, an equity options exchange, in New York and the Eurex and Deutsche Borse's own Xetra cash exchange. The Xetra stock exchange platform is also used by the Irish Stock Exchange, the European Energy Exchange, and the Shanghai Stock Exchange among others. It's long used Linux as the basis of these high-speed stock exchanges.

Shooter's gallery: the 10 most influential FPS games

Filed under
Gaming

telegraph.co.uk: Although it was preceded by id Software's Catacomb 3D, Wolfenstein 3D is widely recognised as the father of the first-person-shooter game and the title which spawned one of the most popular genres in the gaming industry.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.31 - Part 5: CUSE, USB 3.0, FireWire networking and the rest

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Linux 2.6.31 will support USB 3.0, although the corresponding hardware is not yet available. Distributions are to use the new FireWire stack that now offers LAN support. CUSE emulates the Open Sound System via a userspace program.

First look: Opera 10 faster with new features

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Opera 10 has arrived and finds itself needing to stand out in an increasingly crowded browser market. Ars goes hands on with the new release to see if Opera 10 has what it takes.

Also: Should Opera dump its desktop browser?

How To Install GRUB 2 On Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can upgrade your GRUB bootloader to GRUB 2 on Ubuntu 9.04. GRUB 2 has been rewritten from scratch to clean up everything for modularity and portability.

IE tumbles, Firefox regains market share mojo

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Last month, Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer posted its largest market share loss since November 2008, while Firefox reaped nearly all the benefit, Web metrics company Net Applications said today.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more