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About Tux Machines

Friday, 26 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Steam's hardware survey now shows many distros srlinuxx 17/03/2013 - 7:32pm
Story Windows 8: A Review From A Linux User’s Perspective srlinuxx 17/03/2013 - 7:27pm
Story The Kernel Column – Linux Kernel 3.8 srlinuxx 17/03/2013 - 7:21pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 17/03/2013 - 8:15am
Story Open source genealogy with Gramps srlinuxx 17/03/2013 - 1:10am
Story Top Things to do After Installing Ubuntu 13.04 srlinuxx 17/03/2013 - 1:09am
Story 9 Google Reader alternatives srlinuxx 17/03/2013 - 1:06am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 16/03/2013 - 4:58pm
Story Replacing MySQL with MariaDB srlinuxx 16/03/2013 - 4:50am
Story openSUSE 12.3 wallpapers alternativos srlinuxx 16/03/2013 - 4:44am

today's leftovers and stuff

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu and Fonts

  • Ubuntu Hardy - Liberation Fonts now Fully Hinted?
  • Opensuse 11.0 Alpha 3
  • Troubleshooting Defunct (Zombie) Processes on Linux
  • Linux Directory Structure Overview
  • Quickzi: How To Change MySQL Root Password
  • New packages in Ubuntu 8.10 (Hardy Heron) that I'm excited about
  • Make Conky Transparent and movable
  • New Life for an Old Laptop - an Update part 2
  • Two console word processors
  • Howto: Install Safari on Ubuntu with Flash!

Mozilla: what do you fear?

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Question to Mozilla CEO: what do you fear?

  • Miro 1.2 update is out with the latest Mozilla 1.9
  • Firefox + Gmail = GTD

No consensus over OOXML in Poland, yet

Filed under
OSS

polishlinux.org: Last Thursday PKN (Polish Normalization Committee) had a meeting on which it was supposed to come up with the decision concerning Polish recommendation for ISO/IEC DIS 29500 (OOXML) proposed standard. The common stance has not been acheived.

First look at Ubuntu 8.04 “Hardy Heron” beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes: Ubuntu 8.04 “Hardy Heron” has just entered the beta phase of development - and that means another 650+MB download and some good hands-on time with my favorite Linux distro!

Myka sneaks BitTorrent into the living room

Filed under
Hardware

engadget.com: OK, perhaps not so sneaky, there's a nice big BitTorrent logo right up front, but Myka seems to be quite the end-to-end solution for getting those torrents up on the big screen. The box hooks up to the internet via LAN or WiFi, includes a 80GB, 160GB or a 500GB drive for storage and runs a torrent client on Linux.

Mining DistroWatch.com Logs (Part 2)

Filed under
Linux

blue-gnu.biz: This article pursues the analysis of DistroWatch.com's logs I started one week ago. Last time, the data were prepared so that we could investigate the evolution, in time and space, of the popularity of GNU/Linux distributions. Pre-processing the logs in a different manner allows to focus on other interesting questions.

Mythbuntu 8.04 Brings MythTV Improvements To Fruition

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Last November we had looked at Mythbuntu 7.10 and found it to be an excellent MythTV distribution. Today we are taking an early look at this spring refresh using the recently released beta.

What Gael Did Next - Ulteo Online Desktop

Filed under
Linux

lostaddress.org: Gael Duval is the creator of Mandrake Linux. He left Mandriva in March 2006 and went on to start a new project called Ulteo. So what’s it all about?

Operating systems are not cars

Filed under
OS

blogbeebe.blogspot: Every once in a while I come across the argument being made that OS choice is like car choice. It's usually in a forum involving Linux, where one poster will lead off that there's too much choice and the follow-up will read something like "But how will we ever choose what car to buy and drive with all this choice.. it's too much.."

pretty cool Plasma stuff

Filed under
KDE

nowwhatthe.blogspot: Plasma themes rock Wink Now you can have a much more consistent look throughout KDE 4. Here are a few screenshots showing how KDE 4 trunk can look these days.

Ubuntu Beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

hotchkikr.wordpress: Here are some of the new updates for ubuntu HARDY! newer X.org, Newer Gnome, And more! The latest Xorg, Xorg 7.3, is available in Hardy, with an emphasis on better autoconfiguration with a minimal configuration file.

Thanks Ubuntu!

Filed under
Ubuntu

lexlocilinux.blogspot: Until last night, I was not an Ubuntu fan. For various reasons, I preferred PCLinuxOS or Kubuntu over the Linux distribution juggernaut, Ubuntu. But last night, Ubuntu "pulled my fat out of the fire". Here's the story:

One reason Firefox 3 is going to be awesome - Auto-completion in the Location Bar

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.codefront.net: I’m writing this today to rave about how cool this one particular feature, auto-completion in the Location Bar (or the Address Bar, you know, where you type in URLs), in Firefox 3 is.

more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Authenticating an Ubuntu PC to Active Directory

  • Using sed to extract lines in a text file
  • Image Magick Banner Generator - part 4
  • Five Tips for Easter

Update: Mandriva 2008.1RC2

Filed under
MDV

justingill.com/blog: Mandriva 2008.1 RC2 has been out a few days and the reviews are coming in. My biggest concern with Mandriva was the memory issue. Mandriva is listening, and they have responded.

Theory confirmed : Intel and AMD about opensource

Filed under
Hardware

Fabrice Facorat:When AMD begun to release specs for its GPU, I've read a theory about the fact that this move was motivated by the project to release hybrid CPU/GPU by AMD. Intel is now doing the same thing.

Curse Fedora, but you will be using their technologies

Filed under
Linux

clunixchit.blogspot: Recently at FOSDEM we had many visitors at the Fedora booth. Everyone in the Fedora team talked pretty much what they do at the Fedora Project to the public and how important it is, but I should rephrase my sentence "how important it is for the users".

Configuring Views in Konqueror

Filed under
KDE

ppenz.blogspot: In Konqueror for KDE 4.0 it was not possible configuring the views within the settings dialog. As Konqueror uses the Dolphin KPart, it was required to start Dolphin for this task. Well this nasty issue will be a thing of the past.

Games at Google Summer of Code 2008

Filed under
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: Gamesoogle has published a list of mentoring organizations and projects for Google Summer of Code 2008. Quite a few gaming and gaming-related projects have made it again this year:

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto Setup Vidalia TOR GUI with Ubuntu

  • HOWTO setup Atheros AR5007EG wireless on Feisty Fawn (with ndiswrapper)
  • HowTo: Set A Default Browser in Debian
  • Mastering OpenOffice: Tips And Tricks For Your OpenOffice (Part Sleepy
  • Configuring Dual Monitor on Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon
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More in Tux Machines

Servers/Networks

  • Rackspace to be Acquired for $4.3B
    Rackspace announced that it is being acquired in an all-cash deal valued at $4.3B. Pending regulatory anti-trust approval, the firm will be taken private by a group of investors led by Apollo Global Management in Q4 of 2016. This valuation equates to a price of $32/share. The 38% premium cited in the announcement is calculated against a base share price from August 3, as the news about the pending acquisition began increasing the company stock price as early as August 4. For historical context, this valuation falls considerably below the company’s peak market capitalization in January 2013 when Rackspace was worth $10.9B. This means that the company’s current valuation – including the premium – is less than 40% of what it was at its highest point.
  • More on Open Source Tools for Data Science
    Open source tools are having a transformative impact on the world of data science. In a recent guest post here on OStatic, Databricks' Kavitha Mariappan (shown here), who is Vice President of Marketing, discussed some of the most powerful open source solutions for use in the data science arena. Databricks was founded by the creators of the popular open source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, which is itself transforming data science. Here are some other open source tools in this arena to know about. As Mariappan wrote: "Apache Spark, a project of the Apache Software Foundation, is an open source platform for distributed in-memory data processing. Spark supports complete data science pipelines with libraries that run on the Spark engine, including Spark SQL, Spark Streaming, Spark MLlib and GraphX. Spark SQL supports operations with structured data, such as queries, filters, joins, and selects. In Spark 2.0, released in July 2016, Spark SQL comprehensively supports the SQL 2003 standard, so users with experience working with SQL on relational databases can learn how to work with Spark quickly."
  • SDN, open source nexus to accelerate service creation
    What's new in the SDN blog world? One expert says SDN advancements will be accelerated, thanks to SDN and open source convergence, while another points out the influence SDN has in the cloud industry.
  • Platform9 & ZeroStack Make OpenStack a Little More VMware-Friendly
    Platform9 and ZeroStack are adding VMware high availability to their prefab cloud offerings, part of the ongoing effort to make OpenStack better accepted by enterprises. OpenStack is a platform, an archipelago of open source projects that help you run a cloud. But some assembly is required. Both Platform9 and ZeroStack are operating on the theory that OpenStack will better succeed if it’s turned into more of a shrink-wrapped product.
  • Putting Ops Back in DevOps
    What Agile means to your typical operations staff member is, “More junk coming faster that I will get blamed for when it breaks.” There always is tension between development and operations when something goes south. Developers are sure the code worked on their machine; therefore, if it does not work in some other environment, operations must have changed something that made it break. Operations sees the same code perform differently on the same machine with the same config, which means if something broke, the most recent change must have caused it … i.e. the code did it. The finger-pointing squabbles are epic (no pun intended). So how do we get Ops folks interested in DevOps without promising them only a quantum order of magnitude more problems—and delivered faster?
  • Cloud chronicles
    How open-source software and cloud computing have set up the IT industry for a once-in-a-generation battle

KDE and Qt

GNOME News

  • Fresh From the Oven: GNOME Pie 0.6.9 Released
    For a slice of something this weekend you might want to check out the latest update to GNOME Pie, the circular app launcher for Linux desktops.
  • GUADEC 2016 and the Butterfly Effect
  • GUADEC 2016 Notes
    I’m back from GUADEC and wanted to share a few thoughts on the conference itself and the post-conference hackfest days. All the talks including the opening and closing sessions and the GNOME Foundation AGM are available online. Big thanks goes to the organization team for making this possible.

Security News

  • Thursday's security updates
  • Priorities in security
  • How Core Infrastructure Initiative Aims to Secure the Internet
    In the aftermath of the Heartbleed vulnerability's emergence in 2014, the Linux Foundation created the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII)to help prevent that type of issue from recurring. Two years later, the Linux Foundation has tasked its newly minted CTO, Nicko van Someren, to help lead the effort and push it forward. CII has multiple efforts under way already to help improve open-source security. Those efforts include directly funding developers to work on security, a badging program that promotes security practices and an audit of code to help identify vulnerable code bases that might need help. In a video interview with eWEEKat the LinuxCon conference here, Van Someren detailed why he joined the Linux Foundation and what he hopes to achieve.
  • Certificate Authority Gave Out Certs For GitHub To Someone Who Just Had A GitHub Account
    For many years now, we've talked about the many different problems today's web security system has based on the model of security certificates issued by Certificate Authorities. All you need is a bad Certificate Authority be trusted and a lot of bad stuff can happen. And it appears we've got yet another example. A message on Mozilla's security policy mailing list notes that a free certificate authority named WoSign appeared to be doing some pretty bad stuff, including handing out certificates for a base domain if someone merely had control over a subdomain. This was discovered by accident, but then tested on GitHub... and it worked.