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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Get more out of Ubuntu's virtual desktops

Filed under
Ubuntu

cnet.com: Perhaps the greatest single productivity-boosting feature in Linux is the ability to open several virtual desktops at one time. This allows you to create separate work environments for various simultaneous tasks. The multiple desktops let you focus on the task at hand without interruption, but switch to your other active workspace with a single click.

some early howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Syncing a Bluetooth phone with a Linux box

  • Manage MySQL remotely with phpMyAdmin
  • Using pam-mount to create a sandboxed home directory
  • Building GCC Cross-Compilers on Ubuntu Linux
  • Image Magick Banner Generator - part 5

Linux Distros That Could Take The Lead Soon

Filed under
Linux

biguncledave.wordpress: After more than 15 years of Linux development, the last couple of years have seen an explosive spectrum of progress in conquering the desktop. It is as if the world is suddenly waking up and discovering Linux. Lately a whole rash of distros have been coming out of the woodwork, building on the previous progress. Here’s my picks for the distros showing the greatest potential.

How To Set Up Software RAID1 On A Running LVM System (Incl. GRUB Configuration) (Debian Etch)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how to set up software RAID1 on an already running LVM system (Debian Etch). The GRUB bootloader will be configured in such a way that the system will still be able to boot if one of the hard drives fails (no matter which one).

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • More OOXML BRM Messiness: A Delegate from Brazil Challenges "Law of Silence"

  • Best Way To Create Your Own Ubuntu
  • Hidden Linux : Doing the splits
  • Google exec lets slip Android release date?
  • Presens IT conducts Open Source Survey with Red Hat
  • I found my perfect KDE4 Setup!
  • Kernel as hypervisor: Andrea Arcangeli
  • Linux 2.6.24.4
  • Exploring Etoys on the OLPC XO
  • Paul Murphy: Security - lintel vs wintel
  • Exposing a closed Congress to Open Source: Change Congress
  • AMD's "Mystery" Digital Block Supported
  • ATI "r500-fp" DRM Merged To Master
  • Microsoft's real open-source nightmare
  • How to check the exit status code
  • Gnome Needs Plenty of Improvements, but ...

ISO approval: A good process gone bad

Filed under
Misc

redhatmagazine.com: You may have read our background article about ODF and OOXML and why Red Hat believes OOXML should not be approved as an ISO standard. This time, we focus on how the standardization process has been compromised at ISO.

My experience with Mandriva (and 64 bit)

Filed under
MDV

techsmartly.com/blog: I’ve always wanted to try Linux, but it was always impractical, since I had some stuff installed that I needed, and it would take ages to get everything working smoothly on Linux. But now, with a fresh reinstall, why not install Linux as well?

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Misconceptions

  • It’s The Little Things…
  • 5 Must have Apps for Ubuntu
  • Mdv2Ubu...
  • Ubuntu UK Podcast Second Episode

Is the AGPL half-empty, or half-full?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: The GNU Affero GPL, released in November 2007 and approved by the OSI this month, is being viewed as both closure of a GPL loophole and as a tool to truly transfer the collaborative and community benefits of GPL to the software-as-a-service model.

Is Firefox 3 ready for prime time?

Filed under
Moz/FF

desktoplinux: Firefox 3 may still be a beta, Beta 4 to be exact, but in a recent Reuters news story, Mozilla Vice President of Engineering Mike Schroepfer said of the browser, "In many ways it is much more stable than anything else out there." OK, so Reuters jumped the gun. Still, how ready is Firefox 3 for everyday use? I decided to find out.

some howtos and apps:

Filed under
HowTos
  • PIC Programming with Linux #3: installing the needed software

  • Make the Windows Key Open the Gnome Panel Menu
  • File System Checking with fsck
  • gcore: Obtain core dump of current running application
  • Easily Install Prism Web Apps in Ubuntu 8.04
  • gcipher - A simple “encryption” tool
  • Find out what ports are open on Linux
  • KWordQuiz: An amazingly useful flash card tool
  • Inserting more than one row at a time in OpenOffice.org Calc
  • Undeleting photos on (gentoo) linux/windows/mac
  • I like Brasero
  • Music applet

Cuba Votes No to OOXML - Says It Did So in September, Too

Filed under
OSS

groklaw.net: The Cuban National Bureau of Standards has reportedly sent an email to the three names NBs are supposed to notify at ISO, Toshiko Kimura, Keith Brannon, and Martine Gaillen, reporting that Cuba votes to disapprove OOXML.

Linux Docks - 5 Mac OS X Docks for Ubuntu and Other Linux Distros

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: Why is the Dock becoming more and more popular? It’s probably got something to do with clever window management, doesn’t it? Well, in my opinion it’s just the eye candy. Now here’s a list of 5 different Docks you can use on Linux.

The Orientation: Linux

Filed under
Linux

crunchgear.com: Keeping with our Linux theme for the week, I present this week’s Orientation on, well, Linux. Despite a market share of less than 1 percent for the Linux OS compared to 92 percent for Windows and a smidge over 7 percent for Apple’s Mac OS, the seldom used (by the general public) OS is the epitome of open source dev and free software. So for the uninitiated, here’s Linux in a nutshell.

Ubuntu 8.04 “Hardy Heron” beta - making life easier for Windows users

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet.com: Let’s face it, deciding to nuke your existing operating system installation and replace it with a completely different OS isn’t the sort of task that you should approach lightly. One of the barriers to Linux adoption is the fact that many people find the idea of wiping their Windows installation a daunting thing.

Also: Ubuntu 8.04 beta: an agile upgrade

AMD Radeon HD 3200 / 780G

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Last year AMD introduced the flagship 790 Chipset series as part of their Spider Platform for use with the Phenom processors and Radeon HD 3800 graphics. Until earlier this month when AMD introduced the 780 Series, missing was any chipset with integrated graphics capabilities supporting these first AMD quad-core processors. Now we have AMD's 780G and 780V.

Dell, Rivals Leaving Linux Money on the Table

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy is in the market for a small office printer that supports Ubuntu Linux, Mac OS X and Windows XP. Alas, most PC companies do a lousy job describing which of their printers work with Ubuntu. Which means they’re leaving easy money on the table. Here’s our resident blogger’s sad story so far.

The Unexpected (good) side effect of using Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

dthomasdigital.wordpress: I am a Ubuntu believer, as one of those total converts for almost two years now Ubuntu has answered my every computing need. So what’s the side effect you say?

Roundtable: The state of open source

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: Any endeavor rooted in community is bound to spark passionate debate. After all, without contention, how else to determine the best way forward? On the eve of our Open Source Business Conference, we spoke with 11 thought leaders about the current open source climate to uncover the most vibrant themes and conflicts shaping open source today.

Get the Most out of Social Media On Your Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: Sometimes I get the feeling that Web 2.0 is just too fancy for Linux, loads of tools, websites, and apps are being developed without taking Linux users into consideration. Here I will take you through some of the best tools and apps out there and how to get them up and running on your Ubuntu (assume 7.10).

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More in Tux Machines

New NVIDIA SHIELD Android TV Console Shows Up At The FCC

While the Xiaomi Mi Box does seem to be inching closer towards its release and while this is expected to be the next big major device release for the Android TV platform, the last week has seen speculation mounting as to what NVIDIA might have up their sleeves. This is because a new SHIELD Controller popped up on the FCC and this was then followed by new filings for a new SHIELD Remote control. Of course, just because the two controller accessories were passing through the FCC, it does not automatically mean there will also be a new SHIELD Android TV device coming as well. Although on this particular occasion, that looks to be exactly what is happening. Read more

today's leftovers

  • BSODs at scale: we laugh at your puny five storeys, here's our SIX storey #fail
    It's an easy drive-by troll, isn't it? Last week, we asked readers to top the five-storey Blue Screen of Death spotted in Thailand, and examples big and small flooded the inbox. Manchester Piccadilly Station is either vying for the crown with last week's entry, or perhaps it's a display from the same maker. Thanks to James for catching this shot from 2013.
  • Monitoring of Monitoring
    I was recently asked to get data from a computer that controlled security cameras after a crime had been committed. Due to the potential issues I refused to collect the computer and insisted on performing the work at the office of the company in question. Hard drives are vulnerable to damage from vibration and there is always a risk involved in moving hard drives or systems containing them. A hard drive with evidence of a crime provides additional potential complications. So I wanted to stay within view of the man who commissioned the work just so there could be no misunderstanding. The system had a single IDE disk. The fact that it had an IDE disk is an indication of the age of the system. One of the benefits of SATA over IDE is that swapping disks is much easier, SATA is designed for hot-swap and even systems that don’t support hot-swap will have less risk of mechanical damage when changing disks if SATA is used instead of IDE. For an appliance type system where a disk might be expected to be changed by someone who’s not a sysadmin SATA provides more benefits over IDE than for some other use cases. I connected the IDE disk to a USB-IDE device so I could read it from my laptop. But the disk just made repeated buzzing sounds while failing to spin up. This is an indication that the drive was probably experiencing “stiction” which is where the heads stick to the platters and the drive motor isn’t strong enough to pull them off. In some cases hitting a drive will get it working again, but I’m certainly not going to hit a drive that might be subject to legal action! I recommended referring the drive to a data recovery company. The probability of getting useful data from the disk in question seems very low. It could be that the drive had stiction for months or years. If the drive is recovered it might turn out to have data from years ago and not the recent data that is desired. It is possible that the drive only got stiction after being turned off, but I’ll probably never know.
  • Blender 2.78 Is Adding Pascal Support, Fixes Maxwell Performance Issues
  • motranslator 1.1
    Four months after 1.0 release, motranslator 1.1 is out. If you happen to use it for untrusted data, this might be as well called security release, though this is still not good idea until we remove usage of eval() used to evaluate plural formula.
  • Live dmesg following
  • WineTricks has seen a massive amount of improvements this year
    WineTricks has seen allot of development recently, some of the notable changes are better IE 8 support, MetaTrader 4 support, Kindle improvements, Russian translation, A new self update function and a massive amount of other fixes and updates. The full changelog sense February 2016 and August 2016 is provided below with a download link to get the latest release.
  • Sunless Sea expansion Zubmariner releases on October 11th with Linux support
    Sunless Sea is about to get bigger, as Zubmariner has been confirmed for release on October 11th with Linux support.
  • Agenda, control an organization trying to take over the world in this strategy game
  • Clarity (Vector Design) Icon Theme for Linux Desktop’s
    Clarity Icon Theme is completely different from other icon themes because its purly based on Vector design. This theme is based on AwOken and Token, lots of shapes and basic color pallete was taken from these icons. Few icons was taken from Raphael. used some shapes from OpenClipart, Wikipedia, Humanity and AnyColorYouLike Themes. The rest of icons designed by developer by simplifying existed icons or logos. Two types of fonts used Impact and Cheboygan.
  • GUADEC 2016
    I have just returned from our annual users and developers conference. This years’ GUADEC has taken place in the lovely Karlsruhe, Germany. It once again was a fantastic opportunity to gather everyone who works pretty hard to make our desktop and platform the best out there. :)
  • GUADEC 2016, Karlsruhe
    Nice thing this year was that almost everyone was staying in the same place, or close; this favoured social gatherings even more than in the previous years. This was also helped by the organized events, every evenings, from barbecue to picnic, from local student-run bar to beer garden (thanks Centricular), and more. And during the days? Interesting talks of course, like the one offered by Rosanna about how the foundation runs (and how crazy is the US bank system), or the Builder update by Christian, and team meetings.
  • Debian-Based Q4OS 1.6 "Orion" Linux Distro Launches with Trinity Desktop 14.0.3
    Softpedia has been informed today, August 28, 2016, by the developer of the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution about the immediate availability for download of a new stable release to the "Orion" series, version 1.6. The biggest new feature of the Q4OS 1.6 "Orion" release is the latest Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) 14.0.3 desktop environment, an open source project that tries to keep the spirit of the old-school KDE 3.5 desktop interface alive. Q4OS was used the most recent TDE version, so Q4OS 1.6 is here to update it. "The significant Q4OS 1.6 'Orion' release receives the most recent Trinity R14.0.3 stable version. Trinity R14.0.3 is the third maintenance release of the R14 series, it is intended to promptly bring bug fixes to users, while preserving overall stability," say the Q4OS developers in the release announcement.
  • Antergos installation guide with screenshots
  • Reproducible builds: week 70 in Stretch cycle
  • Ubuntu's Mir May Be Ready For FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync
    The Mir display server may already be ready for working with AMD's FreeSync or VESA's Adaptive-Sync, once all of the other pieces to the Linux graphics stack are ready. If the comments from this Mir commit are understood and correct, it looks like Mir may be ready for supporting FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync. While NVIDIA's proprietary driver supports their alternative G-SYNC technology on Linux, AMD FreeSync (or the similar VESA Adaptive-Sync standard) has yet to be supported by the AMD Linux stack. We won't be seeing any AMD FreeSync support until their DAL display stack lands. DAL still might come for Linux 4.9 but there hasn't been any commitment yet by AMD developers otherwise not until Linux 4.10+, and then after that point FreeSync can ultimately come to the open-source AMD driver. At least with the AMDGPU-PRO driver relying upon its own DKMS module, DAL with FreeSync can land there earlier.
  • Python vs. C/C++ in embedded systems
    The C/C++ programming languages dominate embedded systems programming, though they have a number of disadvantages. Python, on the other hand, has many strengths that make it a great language for embedded systems. Let's look at the pros and cons of each, and why you should consider Python for embedded programming.

Canonical Patches Eight Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Just a few minutes ago, Canonical published multiple security advisories to inform the Ubuntu Linux community about the availability of new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu OSes, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus). Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Free Hadoop and Spark Training Options Spread Out
    In the tech job market race these days, hardly any trend is drawing more attention than Big Data. And, when talking Big Data, the subject of Hadoop inevitably comes up, but Spark is becoming an increasingly popular topic. IBM and other companies have made huge commitments to Spark, and workers who have both Hadoop and Spark skills are much in demand. With that in mind MapR Technologies and other providers are offering free Hadoop and Spark training. In many cases, the training is available online and on-demand, so you can learn at your own pace.
  • Git hooks, a cloud by the numbers, and more OpenStack news
    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.
  • Improving phpMyAdmin Docker container
    Since I've created the phpMyAdmin container for Docker I've always felt strange about using PHP's built in web server there. It really made it poor choice for any production setup and probably was causing lot of problems users saw with this container. During the weekend, I've changed it to use more complex setup with Supervisor, nginx and PHP FPM. As building this container is one of my first experiences with Docker (together with Weblate container), it was not as straightforward as I'd hope for, but in the end is seems to be working just fine. While touching the code, I've also improved testing of the Docker container to tests all supported setups and to better report in case of test fails.
  • Support open source motion comic
    There is an ongoing campaign for motion comic. It will be done entirely with FLOSS tools (Blender, Krita, GNU/Linux) and besides that, it really looks great (and no, it is not only for the kids!). Please support this effort if you can because it also shows the power of Free software tools. All will be released Creative Commons Atribution-ShareAlike license together with all sources.
  • GNU APL 1.6 released
    I am happy to announce that GNU APL 1.6 has been released.
  • Italian guide on government websites to be updated
    The source of the document is now available on GitHub, a cloud-based source code management system.
  • Ethiopia’s Lucy is Now Open Source: Famous Bones’ 3D Scans Released
    The world’s most famous fossil is now open source. 3D scans of Lucy — a 3.18-million-year-old hominin found in Ethiopia — were released on 29 August, allowing anyone to examine her arm, shoulder and knee bones and even make their own 3D-printed copies.s
  • How to use open source information to investigate stories online
    Myself and others at First Draft frequently receive emails from a whole range of people asking how they can start doing the sort of online open source investigation and verification that they’ve seen us doing. The skills and methodologies used are all something that can be learnt through a little persistence, but here are a few pieces of advice to get you started.
  • Microsoft relies on Wikipedia and loses Melbourne
    Microsoft’s Bing made the grave mistake on relying on data collected by Wikipedia for its mapping software and lost Melbourne. While Melbourne might not be the nicest it place to live, there were a fair few who felt that Bing Maps moving it to the wrong hemisphere was not exactly fair dinkum. Apparently Vole made the mistake when it collected the data. Ricky Brundritt, a senior program manager at Bing Maps, said that the outfit does not normally rely that much on Wackypedia, but sometimes it uses it.
  • Free education resources from Curriki and Sankoré wikis
    From the days of Gutenberg, technology has been linked to education. Curriki and Sankoré use open source to bring high-quality education to people who need it, and otherwise cannot access it.
  • You don't need a green thumb with this farming robot
    FarmBot is a robotic open hardware system that assists anyone with a small plot of land and a desire to grow food with planting, watering, soil testing, and weeding. It uses a Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and other awesome components, including weather-resistant materials.