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Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu 10.04 is Awesome

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #191
  • Ubuntu 10.04 is Awesome
  • Packages I install after a fresh load of Kubuntu 10.04
  • Tracking The Performance Of Ubuntu 10.10
  • Empathy as Ubuntu's IRC client

The Perfect Server - Ubuntu Lucid Lynx

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Lucid Lynx (Ubuntu 10.04) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Courier POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. In the end you should have a system that works reliably, and if you like you can install the free webhosting control panel ISPConfig 2 (i.e., ISPConfig runs on it out of the box).

Gwibber and Zeitgeist – Another Case of Implicit Relating

Filed under
Software

reflaction.info: Today, a user who wants to get back to what s/he was doing while perceiving or doing something else is given a hard time. Why? Well, because this user is not supplied with a direct link to the information X, which was used while Y happened, upon provision of that Y.

Microsoft Only Singles Out *Linux* As "Infringing On Its Patents"

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

penguinpetes.com: Funny how it's always Linux which Microsoft is alleging is infringing on Microsoft's patent portfolio, isn't it? Not FreeBSD, not OpenBSD, not NetBSD, not Solaris (open or closed), not Plan Nine From Bell Labs, not ReactOS, not Minix, not GNU-HURD, not any of the flavors of proprietary Unix.

Ubuntu 10.4 lives up to the hype

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.techrepublic.com: I realize over the last couple of months I have been just as guilty of hyping up Ubuntu 10.4 as every other person in the media. Did it stand up to what was promised? From my perspective it not only stood up to it, it surpassed the hype.

Growth Market in Theora FUD

Filed under
Software

drdobbs.com: In my last post, I mentioned one of the big problems for the Theora video codec: an active whisper campaign regarding its potential for patent infringement.

Kobby: KDE collaborative text editor

Filed under
KDE
Software

ghacks.net: The KDE equivalent of Gobby is, to no surprise, Kobby. Kobby is a tool that allows users to to collaborate on text files either with another Kobby instance or even an instance of Gobby.

Gunfight at the Linux Corral

Filed under
Linux
PCLOS

bloggeringidiot.blogspot: I had been running the PCLinuxOS 2010 beta in VMWare Player for a while, and update after update it just kept getting better and better. So much better in fact, I decided it was finally good enough to install on the laptop.

Nightmare on Kubuntu Street

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Nightmare on Kubuntu Street
  • Revisiting Bisigi - 13 Top Notch Themes For Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.04 Desktop i386 bootable USB image
  • Ubuntu 10.04 - Late Night Thoughts
  • Ubuntu 10.04
  • (X)ubuntu 10.04

today's howtos and leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • How to fix Firefox slow problem in ubuntu 10.04
  • Install e17 from SVN/source on Ubuntu
  • How to enable Wi-Fi in Asus Eee 1201N and 1201T [Ubuntu 10.04]
  • Improving your resolv.conf file
  • Don’t let updatedb take your Linux down
  • How to Fix the Big and Ugly Plymouth Logo in Ubuntu 10.04
  • Howto Show Home/MyComputer in Ubuntu Desktop
  • Ubuntu for Facebook Users
  • Implementing a shared cache: Part 2
  • Nautilus File Conflict Bug Fixed After 8 Years
  • Building a Fedora 13 Beta Remix
  • openSUSE Weekly News, issue 121 is out
  • A quick one on Being Free
  • The customer is (almost) always right
  • KDevelop 4.0 Stable Released into the Wild

Can you think of a better way to spread the use of Linux?

ghabuntu.com: Camfed International, UK, contracted 1ViLLAGE to set up 48 seats of Ubuntu Linux desktops in four districts in the Northern Region of Ghana.

The Magic Black Box Paradox of Freedom

Filed under
OSS

trombonechamp.wordpress: Free software advocates (myself included) have a habit of claiming that using free (libre) software means the same thing as having freedom. But does the fact that someone is using free software necessarily imply that the person has as much freedom as is possible?

The Slough of Unsatisfied Ubuntu Users

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Slough of Unsatisfied Ubuntu Users
  • What’s New In Kubuntu 10.04
  • Restore Failure
  • Ubuntu 10.04 - Perfect

Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup 0.6.0 Released

Filed under
Gaming

linuxgames.com: What’s probably my favorite Linux game from the past year, Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup, is now at version 0.6.0! It’s a roguelike game that comes in graphical and console flavors.

Leafpad: Yet another Linux text editor

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: In my most recent series of articles I have been highlighting different Linux text editors. Today I will illustrate yet another GUI Linux editor, this time around – Leafpad.

Apple: Worse for open source than Microsoft?

Filed under
Mac
OSS
  • Apple: Worse for open source than Microsoft?
  • Stop Fighting Apple

ODF at 5 Years

Filed under
OSS

robweir.com: Five years ago today, on May 1st, 2005 OASIS approved Open Document Format 1.0 as an OASIS Standard. I’d like to take a few brief minutes to reflect on this milestone, but only a few.

Expected features in Fedora 13 Goddard

Filed under
Linux

icewalkerz.blogspot: boot.fedoraproject.org (BFO) is one of the unique features in Fedora. This effort by Fedora community hopes to completely remove DVD installations in long term.

Linux Mint News update

Filed under
Linux

linuxmint.com: This is just a brief news update about what is going on at the moment:

Here's The First Screenshot Of The Linux Steam Client

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Some still didn't believe the existence of a Steam client for Linux with Source Engine support, but it's something we have said for nearly two years based upon our sources and then the emergence of these binaries.

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More in Tux Machines

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.