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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:42pm
Story CyanogenMod users may not see Android L anytime soon Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:19pm
Story VLC for Android available on Google Play Store Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:15pm
Story LG is the first smartphone maker to join Google's Open Automotive Alliance Roy Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:12pm
Story Ubuntu 14.10 Will Not Ship With Open-Source OpenCL Support Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:11pm
Story Chumby back from the dead with 1,000 apps Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:30pm
Story kGraft Being Discussed For Inclusion Into Linux-Next Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:23pm
Story Qt HiDPI Support Is On Hold For A Few Months Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 8:30pm
Story BrickPi Bookreader 2 interview Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 8:20pm
Story Preview: Fedora 20 Updated vs. Fedora 21 Rawhide Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 8:13pm

The Wrong Way To Sell Linux

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday: It seems that anymore all we hear about Linux and FOSS is it's free of cost, and that desktop Linux is just as good as Windows because it's all pointy-clicky and you don't have to touch the nasty command line which is frightening and must be avoided, and "just like Mac and Windows" you don't have to learn a thing because it's all magic.

Marooned in KDE and Lovin’ It

Filed under
KDE

linuxtidbits.wordpress: I hadn’t much of a thought of KDE before. When I first started Linux I did as most people did and tried Ubuntu, and I was in love. Gnome did just about everything I needed to do and was endlessly customizable.

Ubuntu FOSScamp builds community

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: The week-long Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) meets every six months at changing locations to discuss what will be in the next release of Ubuntu. The mostly unpublicized FOSScamp always meets the weekend before. The FOSScamp un-conference has no program, no invited speakers, and costs nothing. Like some sort of geek Woodstock but smaller, the Ubuntu hip just show up.

Also: Plymouth Planned For Ubuntu 9.10 Integration
And: Ubuntu on Amazon Beta

Interview with Sjoerd Simons of Empathy

Filed under
Software
Interviews

gnomedesktop.org: This is the third in a series of interviews about open source multimedia. For this interview we check in with Sjoerd Simons who works on the Empathy client, an which combines instant messaging, video conferencing and voice over IP into one application. Sjoerd will talk to us about the current status of Empathy and where it is going.

20 bizarre and funny ways people have broken their computers

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom: We here at Pingdom have gone through those press releases and handpicked the funniest and most bizarre incidents, for your reading pleasure.

Why Linux owes (part of) its success to Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: One of the things that characterizes humanity is our ability to adapt quickly to external change - it’s the key reason, for example, that humans aren’t confined to one climatic zone on the planet.

Fedora Outage Notification: Koji, Wiki, Smolt, Transifex

Filed under
Linux
Web

lwn.net: Fedora has an unplanned outage which began at 2008-12-16 08:10 UTC. There is currently no ETA for resolving the issues which are disk related. Services affected are Koji, Wiki, Smolt and Transifex.

Also: Announcing Omega 10

Mandriva Linux Attracts 2,000 Partners

Filed under
MDV

thevarguy.com: When it comes to Linux, most U.S. headlines involve Canonical, Novell or Red Hat. But another Linux distribution — from Mandriva S.A. of Paris, France — is making a name for itself in the global IT channel.

Fine tunning your Linux hardware Systems

Filed under
Linux

Learn how to tune and troubleshoot your Linux hardware

Opera 9.63 Released

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Hei! We released 9.63 today, which addresses quite some security issues. This release is a recommended security upgrade for all those running the latest stable releases.

Perl 5.8.9 released

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: Perl 5.8.9 has been released as the latest and probably last significant release of the Perl 5.8 series. Future releases of the Perl 5.8 series are expected to only deal with security and platform build issues.

The HeHe2-ness Holiday Linux Gift Guide 2008

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: Doing some shopping for your technical friends this year? Or just following the Golden Rule of Giving? That is, Give Something That You Yourself Would Like In Case They Don’t Get Around To Using It. Either way, we’ve shifted through a wide range of gifts to come up with suggestions and ideas in hopes that we can help you expand your range of gift giving.

Open source isn't free software

Filed under
OSS

blogs.computerworld: There's a long standing argument over the differences between "open-source" software and "free software. But, a more common error outside of software ideology circles is that you can use open-source software anyway you please. Nope. Wrong.

A Readers Digest History of Linux

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxblog.com: Linux as we know it was developed in 1991 by Linux Torvalds based upon the GNU code written by, or at least announced by, Richard Stallman in 1983. Just knowing that dispels the myth that Linux is based upon Unix as GNU stands for “Gnu is Not Unix.” This often leads to the use of the term GNU/LINUX.

The OpenSuse FAQ touched me in a bad place

Filed under
SUSE

meandubuntu.wordpress: Today, I was reading Slashdot coverage on the new release of OpenSUSE. Surfing from there led me from one place to another, eventually ending up on the OpenSUSE FAQ:Novell-MS. There was a particular statement that bothered me enough to make this blog entry.

Going Loco Over the Ubuntu Logo

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: Ubuntu is undoubtedly the most popular Linux distribution at the moment. It has millions of passionate users and tons of dynamic community members that can prove it. Let the following images that I’m going to show to you illustrate this phenomenon.

Amarok2.0 Part Two: Continued failure

Filed under
Software

the-gay-bar.com: First thing I saw is that Amarok couldn't playback files but didn't give me any error message. After some thinking I remembered that Ubuntu doesn't install codecs by default but Amarok just silently failed.

Open-source Software Security Vendor Praises 25 Projects

Filed under
OSS

pcworld.com (IDG): Palamida, a vendor that sells software and services around open-source software security and legal compliance, has named 25 open-source projects companies should not hesitate to use.

What’s new in Linux Mint 6 Felicia?

Filed under
Linux

ubuntulook.com: Based on Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex, Linux 2.6.27, Gnome 2.24 and Xorg 7.4, Linux Mint 6 “Felicia” comes with a brand new “Software Manager”, FTP support in mintUpload, proxy support and history of updates in mintUpdate, mint4win (a Linux Mint installer for Microsoft Windows), tabbed browsing in Nautilus and a lot of other improvements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Metro 1.2 Released

  • tor2web brings anonymous Tor sites to the "regular" web
  • My Netbook Took Me Back To Windows
  • ASUS Eee PC 1000HA Netbook
  • The LTSP adds thin-client support to a Linux server
  • Semantic Sense for the Desktop
  • Bringing WINE Into Ubuntu Main
  • 7 Free Open Source Video Editors For Linux
  • Switching to KDE
  • Giving KDE a second chance
  • Intel 2.6 RC1 X.Org Driver Brings DRI2, XvMC
  • Back to Windows
  • Can Wine make Ubuntu better for Ed Tech?
  • Ubuntu EEE's New Name
  • OpenSUSE Linux 11.1 Fans are Jumping the Gun
  • One Linux to Rule Them All?
  • Linux Outlaws 68 - The Episode of the Beast
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More in Tux Machines

11 reasons why Android is winning

You know the smartphone has supplanted every other consumer technology when all anyone really wants in a car now is a “smartphone on wheels.” In a world where most smartphone users have Android-based models, Google is aiming to reach the next billion users coming online — with Android as the nexus of activity. Whether it’s as a Google Home oracle/assistant, Android Auto smart car integration, TensorFlow machine learning or DayDream virtual reality, the Internet search behemoth now aims to become the search engine for your life. Add to that a serious focus on developer tooling and solutions such as Firebase and Android Studio 2.3, and it’s clear that Google is ramping its current ubiquity up to a whole new level. Here are 11 reasons why Android isn’t just for phones anymore. Read more

Qt Creator 4.3 Beta released

Qt Quick Designer now integrates a QML code editor. This allows you to use views like the Properties editor and the Navigator also for text based editing. When you use the split view, you directly see the effects of what you are doing. The graphical editor got support for adding items and tab bar to stacked containers like StackedLayout and SwipeView, a tool bar with common actions, and support for HiDPI displays. Read more Also: Qt Creator 4.3 Beta Rolls Out QML Code Editor & CMake Server-Mode

today's leftovers

  • Red Hat - Another Quarter And A Totally New Set Of Investor Perceptions
  • BIG open-source love Microsoft and Google? You still won't catch AWS [Ed: Microsoft does not love FOSS (or loved by it); it actively attacks FOSS.]
    Open source wasn’t supposed to matter in the cloud. After the Free Software Foundation’s failed attempt to rein in network-delivered software services, some wrung their hands and waited for the open source apocalypse. Instead of imploding, however, open source adoption has exploded, with ever more permissive licenses rising to largely eliminate the need to contribute anything back.
  • Open Source Data:The Last Frontier of the Fintech Revolution
    In the early days of computing, programmers and software developers shared their creations learned from each other and therefore advanced computing and software engineering to new heights.
  • The cheap arm project: An affordable, open-source robotics project
    What do you get when you put together wood and rope? Well according to Plymouth University’s Professor Guido Bugmann: a low-cost, open source, 2 meter tall robot! All buildable for under £2000. The Cheap Arm Project (CHAP) began as an MSc project aimed at developing an affordable mobile robot arm system that could be used by wheelchair users to access daily objects at inaccessible heights or weights (the extreme case being 2 litre bottle).
  • European Interoperability Framework: Commission presents new guidance for digital public services
    The announcement will be made today, at the Digital Day in Rome, together with other initiatives that aim to promote cooperation between EU Member States to better prepare society to reap the full potential of the digital transformation. Many EU Member States are digitising their public administrations to save time, reduce costs, increase transparency, and improve the quality of services that they offer to citizens and businesses. Doing this in a coordinated way ensures that the public sector is not only digital but also interoperable. The EU framework published today will help Member States to follow a common approach when making their public services available online, also across countries and policy areas. This will contribute to reducing bureaucracy for people and businesses, for example, when requesting certificates, enrolling to services, or handing in tax declarations.
  • Carbon Black warns of over reliance on 'nascent' machine learning security

    Security professionals cited high false positive rates and the ease with which machine learning-based technologies can be bypassed – at present – as the most serious barriers to adoption.

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