Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 3.16-rc3 Rianne Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 3:18am
Story Exclusive: A review of the Blackphone, the Android for the paranoid Rianne Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 3:18am
Story Why Android Wear is the new iPad Rianne Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 3:11am
Story Hacking LibreOffice in Paris Roy Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 8:21pm
Story Robolinux 7.5.4 Wants to Be the Ultimate Windows Replacement Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:26pm
Story FreeBSD 9.3 RC2 Released with Numerous Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:19pm
Story Linux Mint 17 "Qiana" Cinnamon and MATE Flavors Get Second Release with Major Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:13pm
Story Paying With Your Time Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:09pm
Story What would you do with millions of pounds? Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:04pm
Story KDE Connect turns your Android phone into a touchpad for your PC Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 6:58pm

Azureus is dead, long live Vuze

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: When it comes to downloading content from the Internet using a P2P protocol of some sort, I'm more of an eMule (aMule) sort of a person. However, if you are into viewing, publishing and sharing DVD and HD modern and current content, Vuze is the application you want.

Interview With Warren Woodford - Founder Of Mepis

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

howsoftwareisbuilt.com: In this interview we talk with Warren. In specific, we talk about: The origins of SimplyMEPIS, Ubuntu’s role in the larger community, Differences among distros from a developer perspective, and The Linux desktop and the future of client-side Linux.

Lancelot, and the Knights of the Plasma Widget

Filed under
KDE

bushweed.blogspot: As controversial as it has been, i've been a supporter of KDE 3's Kickoff menu ( as introduced by openSUSE Linux ), and hence a supporter of the new KDE 4 default menu. There are some vocal protesters, but i feel that this sort of menu is a huge leap forward in general.

Eight Crazy Nights of Hanukkah and Linux

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: Trying to find something for your gelibte this year? Look no further, my Linux Geek's Guide to Hanukkah will help you make the right decisions.

All aboard for the FLOSS Community interaction! (part 1)

Filed under
OSS

cookingwithlinux.com: In this piece I try to explore who the community is and how people and organisations both formal and informal could interact, and what their ground rules might be in some cases, after all it would be unfair of anyone to presume that the same rule sets apply to all groups.

Arch Linux - A sleek, fast Linux distribution

Filed under
Linux

linuxhelp.blogspot: I had always wanted to try Arch Linux. Mainly because, most people who used it became its ardent followers and, I wished to know what was the magic that pulled a Linux user to go the Arch Linux way.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Goofy but fascinating Thunderbird Add-ons

  • Rsync Heaven
  • The Difference Between Vista, XP, Linux and Mac OS Explained
  • LF chief talks up Moblin and the well-hedged OS
  • How to sync Evolution with Google's PIM apps
  • Ubuntu Developer Summit Jaunty Group Picture
  • Development configuration tips for Ubuntu
  • Add a line to files using find and echo
  • Open source - the ultimate globalization tool
  • Screencast: How to Build a Fedora 10 Remix
  • GPL Violations: Is Cisco the Big One?
  • legal chess and the GPL
  • Dell’s New Ads Minimize Ubuntu
  • Instructions from Fedora on fixing the dbus problem
  • How to get CMake find what you want it to
  • How to watermark an image using GIMP
  • Firefox, Chrome and IE Talk Add-ons
  • SETI's very large-scale telescope scans the skies
  • Is Linux ready for the average user? My wife thinks so
  • Google Chrome on GNU/Linux

Ubuntu tries marketing slogan, fails

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcauthority.com.au: Hey, we like Linux, which is why we're a tad concerned by Ubuntu's efforts to come up with a hip training slogan.

Review: ZaReason Makes Desktop Linux A Breeze

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

workswithu.com: Before you finish your holiday shopping, consider the following option: If you’re in the market for a low-end PC, put aside about $300 for the ZaReason Breeze, a small desktop computer that runs Ubuntu Linux.

Q&A with Joe Brockmeier at Novell

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

neowin.net: If you read the Linux section of the Neowin forums recently, you will know that Neowin was recently given the opportunity for a Q&A session with Joe Brockmeier.

Also: Open Source Matures w/ Joe Brockmeier

Play Linux Games From A Live DVD

Filed under
Gaming

makeuseof.com: When it comes to gaming in Linux, one of the most frequently faced problems is the sourcing of the game code then compiling and installing them on your machine. Now, without worrying you about any of the technical details, you can play your favorite Linux game from a Live DVD.

Ubuntu & Songbird, sitting in a tree…..

Filed under
Ubuntu

whacked.net: I’ve spent the past two days down in Mountain View. Yesterday I spent some time at the Ubuntu Developer Summit meeting with the great guys from the Ubuntu Mozilla-team to see about integrating Songbird into Ubuntu.

Managing your movie collection with Griffith

Filed under
Software

linux.com: For a long time, I recorded a basic list of all the backups I made of my movie collection in a scruffy notebook. In due time, I found that relying on a simple piece of paper was wishful thinking. I then endured the laborious process of migrating my list to a spreadsheet on my computer -- but that still wasn't enough. Eventually I found Griffith, a movie collection manager, and was pleasantly surprised to discover what it was capable of.

Archlinux - More Trouble than It’s Worth?

Filed under
Linux

bitburners.com: This is a review-like story about my experiences with the Archlinux Linux distribution. I’ve been using Arch for half an year now and I’ve been quite impressed with it.

Fear Not the Linux Command Line!

Filed under
HowTos

linuxplanet.com: Most recent converts to Linux spend most of their time in the GUI -- the graphical desktop (whether Gnome, or KDE, or XFCE, or some other interface) that's made to look and act somewhat like Windows and Mac. But if you spend all your time in the GUI, you're missing out.

OpenOffice.org 3

Filed under
OOo

linuxworld.com (MacWorld): OpenOffice.org is a powerful productivity suite--including tools for word processing, spreadsheets, slideshows and more--with one major additional feature: it's free.

Jack’s best linux tips and features

Filed under
HowTos

blogs.techrepublic.com: Jack regularly moonlights in the 10 Things blog and occasionally even infiltrates the Windows blog! It’s time to round up some of his Linux-related articles that you might have missed.

How KDE and Kubuntu lost a devotee

Filed under
KDE

How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?

Filed under
Linux

Take a big, deep breath and repeat after me, "There is no perfect OS, there is no perfect OS".

OK, fine, now read this.

When bugtracking systems are being fenced

Filed under
Software

dag.wieers.com/blog: Today, in my quest for a media center solution that suits me, I started fixing some issues with running Elisa on CentOS 5. The Elisa project is using Launchpad for bugtracking and project management and so I created an account to send a few patches.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi based computer offers Real-Time Ethernet

Hilscher is prepping a rugged “netPI” computer that combines a Raspberry Pi 3 with its “netHAT 52-RTE” RPi add-on featuring dual Real-Time Ethernet ports. German Real-Time Ethernet experts Hilscher will soon launch a Raspberry Pi 3-based industrial computer with Real-Time Ethernet support. Hilscher has yet to formally announce the ruggedized netPI computer, but the board was demonstrated at the recent Embedded World show, and was revealed in a Mar. 27 Element14 Community blog by Shabaz. The system can be used as a Real-Time Ethernet gateway or controller, and it supports add-ons such as sensors or actuators to enable additional applications, writes Shabaz. Read more

GNOME Migration and Slideshow

  • The Linux Migration: Corporate Collaboration, Part 2
    Note that a number of folks have suggested alternative calendar applications. I’ve rejected these so far because I don’t think they’ll fit into my workflow or my environment, but they may work for others. Some of the applications I’ve seen suggested include Rainlendar, Calcurse, or KOrganizer. Some of these applications address some of the shortcomings of GNOME Calendar, but none of them address all the major issues I’ve outlined here (based on my testing thus far).
  • GNOME 3.24 Provides Users With More Pleasing Linux Desktop Experience

Dowry to Linux Foundation From NSA Ally

  • AT&T takes up membership in the Linux Foundation, furthers open source efforts
    AT&T has become a Platinum member in the Linux Foundation, a move that reflects the telco’s ongoing effort to implement open source and open networks not only in its own networks but also to drive broader industry collaboration. One example of this is AT&T's Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) architecture. In February, AT&T contributed several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that AT&T has become a Platinum member. This follows news of the company’s contribution of several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.

GNU/Linux on Servers: VisionMobile Report, Cilium, Microservices, and Kubernetes

  • VisionMobile Report Lays Out Developer Salaries by Skill, Software Sector, and Location
    In 2017, that means skilled cloud and backend developers, as well as those who work in emerging technologies including Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning and augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) can make more money -- tens or sometimes hundreds of times more -- than frontend web and mobile developers whose skills have become more commoditized. “In Western Europe, for example, the median backend developer earns 12% more than the median web developer; a machine learning developer makes 28% more,” according to the report.
  • Cilium leverages Linux kernel for advanced container networking
    Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier. Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.
  • Modules vs. microservices
    Much has been said about moving from monoliths to microservices. Besides rolling off the tongue nicely, it also seems like a no-brainer to chop up a monolith into microservices. But is this approach really the best choice for your organization? It’s true that there are many drawbacks to maintaining a messy monolithic application. But there is a compelling alternative which is often overlooked: modular application development. In this article, we'll explore what this alternative entails and show how it relates to building microservices.
  • What Is Kubernetes?
    Kubernetes is open source software for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. The project is governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which is hosted by The Linux Foundation. And it’s quickly becoming the Linux of the cloud, says Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. Running a container on a laptop is relatively simple. But connecting containers across multiple hosts, scaling them when needed, deploying applications without downtime, and service discovery among several aspects, are really hard challenges. Kubernetes addresses those challenges with a set of primitives and a powerful API.