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About Tux Machines

Friday, 20 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create a Bootable FreeDOS USB Drive on Linux With UNetbootin
  • How To: Upgrade Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 to v5.4
  • Locating Your Laptop With Dynamic DNS
  • Easy way to use any DialUP modem Without WVDIAL in Ubuntu/Linux
  • Ubuntu Dual Boot Install
  • Record screencasts to animated GIF files
  • Howto: Dual Boot Ubuntu and Windows on RAID 10
  • Encrypting your private data - Part 2
  • Exclude Websites From Appearing In The Firefox Address Bar
  • Make your own Wayback Machine or Time Machine in GNU/Linux with rsnapshot
  • How To Fix The KStars Broken Package in Kubuntu 9.04 (KDE 4.3)
  • Firefox Can’t Find Acobat Reader In Your Home Directory (Linux)

CrossOver Games 8.0, Now With Zombie-Plague Protection

Filed under
Software
Gaming

ostatic.com/blog: It's been a while since CodeWeavers updated CrossOver Games and today's release of version 8.0 is a doozy.

openSUSE-LXDE live CD now ready

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Yes, that’s true! After some develop and tests i finally completed the openSUSE-LXDE live installable iso based on openSUSE 11.1 made with SUSE-STUDIO.

Should the Gates Foundation support Mac, Linux PCs

computerworld.com: The Gates Foundation has done a commendable job for the past ten years installing Windows computers in public libraries around the country. While the purpose of these donated computers was not to maintain and expand Windows market share, the net effect of this philanthropy has been to do just that.

10 Linux file managers worth checking out

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: If you’ve never given your file manager much thought, maybe it’s time to look at the wide range of features offered by Linux file management tools.

Murphy's Law: Open-Source Should Go Unrewarded

Filed under
OSS

maximumpc.com: Why do open-source programs win awards? Or, rather, what is it about open-source that makes us so prone to dishing out accolades--as if the very nature of a program being open-source somehow makes it indistinguishable from any other common application you can use. Why do we keep giving the same programs the same awards?

Interview with Eric Hameleers: Why You Should Try Slackware

Filed under
Interviews
Slack

linux-mag.com: Linux Magazine spoke with Eric Hameleers (known as Alien BOB) about the 64-bit port and why users should consider switching to Slackware. As Eric discusses, this 64-bit release came from a ground up approach which has even managed to benefit the 32-bit build in the process.

Also: Continued Amazement

Internet celebrates 40th birthday: but what date should we be marking?

Filed under
Web

telegraph.co.uk: The internet celebrates its birthday today, September 2, with 40 years having passed since the first successful transfer of data between two computers.

The best netbook ever?

Filed under
Hardware

education.zdnet.com: Netbooks, in a variety of applications, are certainly among my favorites. After all, they’re cheap, they do most of what we need them to do, they fit well in backpacks, they’re cheap, and, oh yeah, they’re cheap.

Opera 10 – Finally a browser that is NOT sluggish

Filed under
Software

* Opera 10 – Finally a browser for linux that is NOT sluggish
* Opera 10 - A First Look At This Fabulous Web Browser
* Fun and games with Opera 10 widgets

Open Source Karaoke Game Hits the Right Notes

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: Though Performous is a really fun open source karaoke game, I'll spare you the sound bite of me singing along with my favorite tune (trust me, you don't want to hear). Instead, you'll want to go download this cool cross-platform app and spend the day crooning into your hairbrush and pretending you're Elvis.

Linux Gazette September 2009 (#166):

Filed under
Linux

Linux Gazette September 2009 (#166) is out. Highlights include: Away Mission: VMware World, Digital ID World and Intel Developer Forum; Using Linux to Teach Kids How to Program, 10 Years Later (Part I); and Internet Radio Router.

Red Hat Aims RHEL 5.4 At The Cloud

Filed under
Linux

eweekeurope.co.uk: New operating system release and hypervisor development work put the open source vendor on a collision course with VMware and Microsoft

Vixta Linux 2009.7

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: A lot of Windows users have considered switching to Linux and usually when they do switch it means getting used to a whole new look and feel on their desktop computers. But what happens when Linux is made to look like Windows? Is that a good thing or a bad thing?

Slackware 13.0 - ho hum

Filed under
Slack

techiemoe.com: Slackware. It's an institution in its own right. Some might argue that it's *put* people into institutions as well, out of either frustration or zealotry. Whatever your opinion may be about it, there's little doubt that it's a strong one.

Also: Slackware 13.0

Simple, Fast, and Geeky Console-based Audio Players for Linux

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Software

junauza.com: To those of you who are new to Linux, you may not know that you can use the shell terminal to do some fun stuff like play games, watch Star Wars, and even browse the web. You can even blast your favorite music with it.

Why Linux does not look like Windows

Filed under
Linux

tech-no-media.com: One interesting remark I read in some comments is that Linux distributions are not successful because they don't look enough like Windows. Apparently if someone completely copied the interface of Windows and slapped that on top of Linux, Windows users would migrate in droves.

Comparing windows and Linux hardware management.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: An operating systems most basic function is to act as a layer between the computer hardware and the user space programs. What an operating system provides to those user space programs is a standard interface to the computers hardware, no matter what type of hardware that is.

The Best Image Viewers For Linux

Filed under
Software

d0od.blogspot: Below are a selection of Image Viewers that provide more features than the default application and how they compare against it.

How to be anonymous online with Incognito

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: At first glance Incognito may seem suited only for the extremely paranoid, because of the totality of tools it offers to hide your online presence. This 430MB-ish live CD has many faithful users, but I can't quote any on its usefulness since their identities couldn't be confirmed. Yes, Incognito is that good.

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More in Tux Machines

Mastodon 2.0

About 6 months have passed since April, during which the major mainstream breakthrough of our decentralized social network took place. From 20,000 users to almost a million! What better time to run through a couple examples of what’s been introduced since then? Mastodon is defined by its focus on good user experience, polished design and superior anti-abuse tools. In that vein, the web app has received numerous updates. Using the latest browser features, the web app receives real push notifications, making it almost indistinguishable from a native mobile app. It works faster and looks smoother thanks to many performance and design improvements. Read more

Red Hat: Satellite, OpenShift, Government, SoftBank

  • A Red Hat Satellite tutorial to install an update server
    Is server patch management the best part of your job? Stop reading here. Many IT organizations struggle with OS patching processes. For Red Hat administrators who are willing to invest some initial energy to simplify later tasks, Satellite provides infrastructure lifecycle management, including capabilities for provisioning, reporting and configuration management. To this end, follow this Red Hat Satellite tutorial to set up a simple server for updates. Once we review how to install the basic update server, we'll create one example client.
  • Red Hat updates Gluster storage for OpenShift container apps
    Red Hat bolstered Gluster storage for its OpenShift Container Platform, adding iSCSI block and S3 object interfaces, as well as greater persistent volume density.
  • Red Hat to Cover Open Source Collaboration at Gov’t Symposium; Paul Smith Comments
    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) is set to hold its annual symposium on federal information technology on Nov. 9 where the company will host discussions on open source collaboration and its potential benefits for government, GovCon Executive reported Oct. 11.
  • Red Hat’s Container Technologies and Knowledge Were Chosen by SoftBank to Embrace DevOps
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that several of Red Hat’s open source technologies, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, as well as the knowledge of Red Hat Consulting, were chosen by SoftBank Corp (“SoftBank”), a subsidiary of SoftBank Group Corp., to implement DevOps methodology for its Service Platform Division, IT Service Development Division, Information Technology Unit, and Technology Unit, the company’s in-house IT organization. This large, varied organization develops, maintains and operates SoftBank’s IT systems for internal work and operations, supporting 600 diverse systems.
  • Form 4 RED HAT INC For: Oct 17 Filed by: Kelly Michael A
  • Taking a Fresh Look at Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)

Security: Google Play, WPA2, FERC, HackerOne

  • 8 'Minecraft' apps infected with Sockbot malware on Google Play found adding devices to botnet

    Security researchers have discovered that at least eight malware-laced apps on Google Play Store are ensnaring devices to a botnet to potentially carry out distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) and other malicious attacks. These apps claimed to provide skins to tweak the look of characters in the popular Minecraft: Pocket Edition game and have been downloaded as many as 2.6 million times.

  • KRACK Vulnerability: What You Need To Know
    This week security researchers announced a newly discovered vulnerability dubbed KRACK, which affects several common security protocols for Wi-Fi, including WPA (Wireless Protected Access) and WPA2. This is a bad vulnerability in that it likely affects billions of devices, many of which are hard to patch and will remain vulnerable for a long time. Yet in light of the sometimes overblown media coverage, it’s important to keep the impact of KRACK in perspective: KRACK does not affect HTTPS traffic, and KRACK’s discovery does not mean all Wi-Fi networks are under attack. For most people, the sanest thing to do is simply continue using wireless Internet access.
  • FERC sets rules to protect grid from malware spread through laptops
    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday proposed new mandatory cybersecurity controls to protect the utility system from the threat posed by laptops and other mobile devices that could spread malicious software. The standards are meant to "further enhance the reliability and resilience of the nation's bulk electric system" by preventing malware from infecting utility networks and bringing down the power grid, according to the nation's grid regulator.
  • Hack These Apps And Earn $1,000 — Bug Bounty Program Launched By Google And HackerOne
  • Security Vulnerability Puts Linux Kernel at Risk

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