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Tuesday, 12 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Is Ubuntu's release cycle its downfall?

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Is Ubuntu's release cycle its downfall?
  • The Intersection Of Quality And Expectations

Ripping CDs with FLAC - Best Compression Settings

Filed under
HowTos

As storage space becomes cheaper, there's a growing trend to save digital music files in a lossless format. Such lossless formats provide an exact replication of the audio quality found in the original content, usually on CD. The resulting files are also much larger, when compared to MP3 or AAC at 128kbps or 256kpbs. A favourite open source lossless audio codec is FLAC, which stands for Free Lossless Audio Codec. Within the possible FLAC settings there are 8 levels of compression to choose from when creating new files.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  1. SimplyMEPIS 8.0.12 Maintenance Release Available
  2. And windows shoots itself in the foot, again.
  3. Activation Frustration? Not With Linux!
  4. Mavizen’s Electric Motorcycle Has Built-In Wi-Fi, Linux
  5. Moblin 2.1 released
  6. France 24 migrates to Drupal 6, codebase to be open-sourced
  7. ATI Drivers 9.10 Working with 2.6.30+ Kernels
  8. Top 10 Issues Confronting Users of Open Source
  9. Hugin: Where we are and where we're going
  10. Conversion examples between OOo and MS Office
  11. OpenSUSE Project Transfers Parts of Maintenance to Community
  12. Danish TV 2 Is No Friend Of Linux
  13. Novell & MS file motions in Wordperfect case
  14. Live from ApacheCon: Subversion Joins ASF
  15. Jaspersoft Joins Open Source Software Institute
  16. Red Hat Expands Advanced Mission-Critical Program
  17. Virtualbox for solving a common small business problem
  18. Kubuntu Notification Helper
  19. Google Releases Core Development Tools as Open Source
  20. Wireless Cortex-A8 module supports Linux
  21. Molding a career in Open Source
  22. The Importance of an Open Internet

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Build a Silent, Standalone XBMC Media Center On the Cheap
  • HOWTO: Compiling Intel Atom Poulsbo GMA 500 graphics driver on Debian
  • Install Compiz & Compiz Fusion plugins on Ubuntu 9.10
  • Symmetric Key Encryption with GnuPG
  • How to install sopcast player in Ubuntu 9.10
  • Package Management With Zypper
  • How to use Empathy Messenger
  • Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part V: a.vim
  • 10 straightforward but proven ways to harden your LAMP servers
  • syslog-ng trap
  • Let Munin monitor your servers and network
  • How to restore Ubuntu 9.04 notifications Position in 9.10
  • DOS to UNIX/Linux Translation (DOS to Linux Cheat Sheet)
  • Establishing a Password Policy in openSUSE

Ubuntu Netbook Remix 9.10 Shines Bright

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxplanet.com: Canonical released Ubuntu 9.10 in various forms last week including the Ubuntu Netbook Remix (UNR) edition. UNR has been around since Ubuntu 8.04 (see Mark Shuttleworth's blog for a good summary of UNR) and has taken on some pretty stiff competition of late from Moblin. Enquiring minds want to know which version is better for my netbook?

A strangely compromised Linux box

Filed under
Linux
Security

aplawrence.com: A customer reported that a Linux machine used for ssh access (to in turn give telnet access to an ancient SCO machine) was refusing logins. I asked him to try logging in as root at the console; he was unable to do so.

9 Free Linux Distributions: A Linux Free For All

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: Have you searched for Linux distributions that are 100% free? Did you find more than one that suited your needs? Well, here's a list of nine from which you can choose your favorite. Free means freedom to alter, redistribute, sell or release as a different product with no restrictions on you or your new distribution.

kde apps update

Filed under
KDE
Software

Open Source: More than a License

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: Has the terminology finally evolved in the debate over "who's open source?" It would seem so. After years of haggling over the essence of open source, free software or other monikers, Simon Phipps gets right to the point in "A Remarkable Reversal" - his critique of Richard Stallman's joint letter to the EC regarding Oracle and MySQL.

Also: Report: Oracle not yielding to EU with Sun buy

Another Protocol Bites The Dust

Filed under
Security

links.org: For the last 6 weeks or so, a bunch of us have been working on a really serious issue in SSL. In short, a man-in-the-middle can use SSL renegotiation to inject an arbitrary prefix into any SSL session, undetected by either end.

My Linux Gaming Experience

Filed under
Gaming

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Arguably gaming is the one place in which Linux is sorely lacking. Very few titles release with a native installer for this platform and as such many say gaming is impossible on Linux. This is just not true.

KDE makes me happy

Filed under
KDE

celettu.wordpress: I’ll be honest, I’m surprising myself by not returning to Openbox. I’m still running Chakra with KDE, and I still love it. It needs a couple extra seconds to boot, but afterwards it feels just as fast as Openbox.

Vote for the openSUSE DVD Cover

Filed under
SUSE

dissociatedpress.net: Typically Novell has created the artwork for the openSUSE DVDs, but this time around we had some really interesting and creative input from openSUSE contributors.

Too Much For Too Litl?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

informationweek.com/blog: A Boston-based startup named Litl is taking a big risk: they're betting people will go for a netbook that sports a Linux-based OS and focuses on Web-/network-based productivity (Facebook, Twitter, etc.). The risk is in the pricetag:

The trough of disillusionment for Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.gnome.org: Reading this blog entry on Linux Magazine, the thought occurred to me that Ubuntu is making its way nicely along the path that new projects have travelled for many years. The Hype Cycle.

Also: Is Karmic Ubuntu's Vista?

Lesser Known, But Very Helpful Features in OpenOffice.org Writer

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: Anyone using Linux (or any operating system for that matter) should know about the OpenOffice.org office suite. But when you really start getting down to business, you will find there are features tucked away in this software that you may not have known existed.

Quick Review: Mandriva 2010 – Impressive

Filed under
MDV
  • Quick Review: Mandriva 2010 – Impressive
  • Mandriva Linux 2010 Review and Commentary

You don’t need to convert them…

Filed under
Linux

terminally-incoherent.com: Recently a friend of mine approached me with a weird question: how to install Windows on a machine without a CD or Floppy drive. I was intrigued. The obvious question here was “why?” “Why don’t you just keep Ubuntu?” I asked him.

Distributions *are* the strength of Linux

Filed under
Linux

blog.flameeyes.eu: Some people think that no operating system has any need for distributions, but one of the thing that impress most the users who switch is, in many cases (at least that I could look at myself) the presence of distributions and the ability to install almost any software by simply looking it up in the package manager.

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More in Tux Machines

If You're Ready for Arch, ArchMerge Eases the Way

Newcomer ArchMerge Linux offers a big change for the better to those switching from the Debian Linux lineage to the Arch Linux infrastructure. ArchMerge Linux is a recent spinoff of ArchLabs Linux. I recently reviewed Archlabs and found it to be a step up from most Arch Linux offerings in terms of installation and usability. Arch Linux distros, in general, are notorious for their challenging installation and software management processes. ArchMerge Linux brings a few extra ingredients that make trying it well worth your while if you want to consider migrating to the Arch Linux platform. Still, no Arch Linux distro is a suitable starting point for Linux newcomers. That reality does not change with ArchMerge, although it helps ease the process considerably for those who are ready for it. Read more

today's howtos

Spaceman Shuttleworth Finds Earthly Riches With Ubuntu Software

He’s best known for being the world’s first “Afronaut,” but since returning to Earth from his 2002 trip on Russia’s Soyuz TM-34 rocket ship, Cape Town native Mark Shuttleworth set about with the conquest of a much more lucrative universe: the internet-of-things. Shuttleworth created Ubuntu, an open-source Linux operating system that helps connect everything from drones to thermostats to the internet. His company, Canonical Group Ltd., makes money from about 800 paying customers, including Netflix Inc., Tesla Inc. and Deutsche Telekom AG, which pay for support services. Its success has helped boost his net worth to $1 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. “It’s destructive to be too focused on that,” Shuttleworth said of his wealth in an interview at Bloomberg’s office in Boston. “It’s just a distraction from whether you have your finger on the pulse of what’s next.” Read more Also:

  • Rocket.chat communication platform enables simplicity through snaps
    Created in Brazil, Rocket.Chat provides an open source chat solution for organisations of all sizes around the world. Built on open source values and a love of efficiency, Rocket.Chat is driven by a community of contributors and has seen adoption in all aspects of business and education. As Rocket.Chat has evolved, it has been keen to get its platform into the hands of as many users as possible without the difficulties of installation often associated with bespoke Linux deployments.
  • The Silph Road embraces cloud and containers with Canonical
    The Silph Road is the premier grassroots network for Pokémon GO players around the world offering research, tools, and resources to the largest Pokémon GO community worldwide, with up to 400,000 visitors per day Operating a volunteer-run, community network with up to 400,000 daily visitors is no easy task especially in the face of massive and unpredictable demand spikes, and with developers spread all over the world.With massive user demand and with volunteer developers located all over the world, The Silph Road’s operations must be cost-effective, flexible, and scalable. This led the Pokémon GO network first to cloud, and then to containers and in both cases Canonical ’s technology was the answer.

How to Install Arch Linux

Installing Arch Linux could be a tidious and tricky task. Here's how to do it the right way. Read more