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Saturday, 21 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 9:35pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 9:33pm
Story This Mechanical Keyboard Is Secretly An Android Computer Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 9:32pm
Story Black Lab BriQ rev4 Is a "Mac Mini" type PC That Runs Black Lab Linux Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 8:35pm
Story ROV dives deep in Antarctic waters with Linux-based cams Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 8:31pm
Story 4MLinux Allinone Edition 11.1 Beta Now Ready for Testing Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 8:25pm
Story Ozon OS Gets GTK+ Theme Update, Still No Release Date for This Beautiful OS Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 8:02pm
Story The World’s Email Encryption Software Relies on One Guy, Who is Going Broke Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 7:54pm
Story Which Light Weight, Open Source Web Server is Right for You? Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 7:43pm
Story KDevelop 4.7.1 Released Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2015 - 7:28pm

How To Add A Splash Image To GRUB 2 On Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can add a splash image to your GRUB 2 boot loader on Ubuntu 9.04. Please note that you should use this tutorial only if you have upgraded your bootloader to GRUB 2 previously.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • A Video Editor that Just Works
  • Ubuntu certified on the latest HP Servers
  • Sutor's Red Hat Summit keynote: “Linux Everywhere?"
  • Microsoft contract forces cancellation of Stallman talk in Argentina
  • Linus Torvalds in Live Streaming from LinuxCon
  • Red Hat Announces Enhancements to Red Hat Enterprise Linux Management Solutions
  • Put Trading Swells on Red Hat (RHT)
  • Metadata Performance of Four Linux File Systems
  • msec future and plans
  • Hunt for the perfect Operating System
  • Enterprise windows and Linux destops. Is it possible?
  • Kindle Hacking: It's a "lovely little Linux box"
  • A Few Details On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
  • Linux Outlaws 109 - Saturday Light Live
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 1 Episode 16

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create a Bootable FreeDOS USB Drive on Linux With UNetbootin
  • How To: Upgrade Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 to v5.4
  • Locating Your Laptop With Dynamic DNS
  • Easy way to use any DialUP modem Without WVDIAL in Ubuntu/Linux
  • Ubuntu Dual Boot Install
  • Record screencasts to animated GIF files
  • Howto: Dual Boot Ubuntu and Windows on RAID 10
  • Encrypting your private data - Part 2
  • Exclude Websites From Appearing In The Firefox Address Bar
  • Make your own Wayback Machine or Time Machine in GNU/Linux with rsnapshot
  • How To Fix The KStars Broken Package in Kubuntu 9.04 (KDE 4.3)
  • Firefox Can’t Find Acobat Reader In Your Home Directory (Linux)

CrossOver Games 8.0, Now With Zombie-Plague Protection

Filed under
Software
Gaming

ostatic.com/blog: It's been a while since CodeWeavers updated CrossOver Games and today's release of version 8.0 is a doozy.

openSUSE-LXDE live CD now ready

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Yes, that’s true! After some develop and tests i finally completed the openSUSE-LXDE live installable iso based on openSUSE 11.1 made with SUSE-STUDIO.

Should the Gates Foundation support Mac, Linux PCs

computerworld.com: The Gates Foundation has done a commendable job for the past ten years installing Windows computers in public libraries around the country. While the purpose of these donated computers was not to maintain and expand Windows market share, the net effect of this philanthropy has been to do just that.

10 Linux file managers worth checking out

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: If you’ve never given your file manager much thought, maybe it’s time to look at the wide range of features offered by Linux file management tools.

Murphy's Law: Open-Source Should Go Unrewarded

Filed under
OSS

maximumpc.com: Why do open-source programs win awards? Or, rather, what is it about open-source that makes us so prone to dishing out accolades--as if the very nature of a program being open-source somehow makes it indistinguishable from any other common application you can use. Why do we keep giving the same programs the same awards?

Interview with Eric Hameleers: Why You Should Try Slackware

Filed under
Interviews
Slack

linux-mag.com: Linux Magazine spoke with Eric Hameleers (known as Alien BOB) about the 64-bit port and why users should consider switching to Slackware. As Eric discusses, this 64-bit release came from a ground up approach which has even managed to benefit the 32-bit build in the process.

Also: Continued Amazement

Internet celebrates 40th birthday: but what date should we be marking?

Filed under
Web

telegraph.co.uk: The internet celebrates its birthday today, September 2, with 40 years having passed since the first successful transfer of data between two computers.

The best netbook ever?

Filed under
Hardware

education.zdnet.com: Netbooks, in a variety of applications, are certainly among my favorites. After all, they’re cheap, they do most of what we need them to do, they fit well in backpacks, they’re cheap, and, oh yeah, they’re cheap.

Opera 10 – Finally a browser that is NOT sluggish

Filed under
Software

* Opera 10 – Finally a browser for linux that is NOT sluggish
* Opera 10 - A First Look At This Fabulous Web Browser
* Fun and games with Opera 10 widgets

Open Source Karaoke Game Hits the Right Notes

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: Though Performous is a really fun open source karaoke game, I'll spare you the sound bite of me singing along with my favorite tune (trust me, you don't want to hear). Instead, you'll want to go download this cool cross-platform app and spend the day crooning into your hairbrush and pretending you're Elvis.

Linux Gazette September 2009 (#166):

Filed under
Linux

Linux Gazette September 2009 (#166) is out. Highlights include: Away Mission: VMware World, Digital ID World and Intel Developer Forum; Using Linux to Teach Kids How to Program, 10 Years Later (Part I); and Internet Radio Router.

Red Hat Aims RHEL 5.4 At The Cloud

Filed under
Linux

eweekeurope.co.uk: New operating system release and hypervisor development work put the open source vendor on a collision course with VMware and Microsoft

Vixta Linux 2009.7

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: A lot of Windows users have considered switching to Linux and usually when they do switch it means getting used to a whole new look and feel on their desktop computers. But what happens when Linux is made to look like Windows? Is that a good thing or a bad thing?

Slackware 13.0 - ho hum

Filed under
Slack

techiemoe.com: Slackware. It's an institution in its own right. Some might argue that it's *put* people into institutions as well, out of either frustration or zealotry. Whatever your opinion may be about it, there's little doubt that it's a strong one.

Also: Slackware 13.0

Simple, Fast, and Geeky Console-based Audio Players for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: To those of you who are new to Linux, you may not know that you can use the shell terminal to do some fun stuff like play games, watch Star Wars, and even browse the web. You can even blast your favorite music with it.

Why Linux does not look like Windows

Filed under
Linux

tech-no-media.com: One interesting remark I read in some comments is that Linux distributions are not successful because they don't look enough like Windows. Apparently if someone completely copied the interface of Windows and slapped that on top of Linux, Windows users would migrate in droves.

Comparing windows and Linux hardware management.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: An operating systems most basic function is to act as a layer between the computer hardware and the user space programs. What an operating system provides to those user space programs is a standard interface to the computers hardware, no matter what type of hardware that is.

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

GNU/Linux on Desktop/Phone: System76, DeX, Librem

  • Pop!_OS Is Finally Here — System76’s Ubuntu-based Operating System For Developers
    The first ever stable release of Pop!_OS is finally here. You can go ahead and download it from this link. Don’t forget to share your feedback. Earlier this year in June, we reported that System76 is creating its own Linux distro called Pop!_OS.
  • Samsung DeX Promises to Bring the Linux PC Experience to Your Mobile Device
    After unveiling its next-generation Bixby 2.0 intelligent assistant, Samsung today announced that it plans to bring the Linux PC experience to the Samsung DeX ecosystem.
  • Steps toward a privacy-preserving phone
    What kind of cell phone would emerge from a concerted effort to design privacy in from the beginning, using free software as much as possible? Some answers are provided by a crowdfunding campaign launched in August by Purism SPC, which has used two such campaigns successfully in the past to build a business around secure laptops. The Librem 5, with a five-inch screen and radio chip for communicating with cell phone companies, represents Purism's hope to bring the same privacy-enhancing vision to the mobile space, which is much more demanding in its threats, technology components, and user experience. The abuse of mobile phone data has become a matter of worldwide concern. The capture and sale of personal data by apps is so notorious that it has been covered in USA Today; concerns over snooping contribute to the appeal of WhatsApp (which has topped 1.3 billion users) and other encrypted and privacy-conscious apps. But apps are only one attack vector. I got in touch with Todd Weaver, founder and CEO of Purism, to find out what the company is doing to plug the leaks in mobile devices.

Servers: DockerCon Coverage, MongoDB IPO

  • DockerCon EU 17 Panel Debates Docker Container Security
    There are many different security capabilities that are part of the Docker container platform, and there are a number of vendors providing container security offerings. At the DockerCon EU 17 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, eWEEK moderated a panel of leading vendors—Docker, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Aqua Security, Twistlock and StackRox—to discuss the state of the market. To date, there have been no publicly disclosed data breaches attributed to container usage or flaws. However, that doesn't mean that organizations using containers have not been attacked. In fact, Wei Lien Dang, product manager at StackRox, said one of his firm's financial services customers did have a container-related security incident.
  • DockerCon EU: Tips and Tools for Running Container Workloads on AWS
    Amazon Web Services wants to be a welcome home for developers and organizations looking to deploy containers. At the DockerCon EU conference here, a pair of AWS technical evangelists shared their wisdom on the best ways to benefit from container deployments. The terms microservices and containers are often used interchangeably by people. Abby Fuller, technical evangelist at AWS, provided the definition of microservices coined by Adrian Crockford, VP of Cloud Architecture at AWS and formerly the cloud architect at Netflix.
  • Docker CEO: Embracing Kubernetes Removes Conflict
    Steve Singh has ambitious plans for Docker Inc. that are nothing less than transforming the world of legacy applications into a modern cloud-native approach. Singh was named CEO of Docker on May 2 and hosted his first DockerCon event here Oct. 16-19. The highlight of DockerCon EU was the surprise announcement that Docker is going to support the rival open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In a video interview with eWEEK, Singh explained the rationale behind the Kubernetes support and provided insight into his vision for the company he now leads.
  • MongoDB's IPO Beats the Market Out of the Gate
    The folks at MongoDB raised a whole lot of money today in their debut on NASDAQ. Yesterday the open source company announced it was going to be asking $24 a share for the 8 million Class A shares it was letting loose in its IPO, which had some Wall Street investors scratching their heads and wondering if the brains at Mongo were suffering from some kind of undiagnosed damage. Analysts had been estimating an opening price of between $20-22 per share, and on October 6 the company had estimated an opening price in the range of $18-20.