Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story K. Y. Srinivasan: From Serving Microsoft’s Agenda Inside Novell to Helping Microsoft Infiltrate and Control Linux Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:15pm
Story Best Practice Linux Guide: Data Security Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:08pm
Story The Linux Mint Security Controversy Taken Out of Proportions, Distracting From Real Controversies Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 7:27pm
Story Winamp Petition Emerges as Microsoft Considers Purchase Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 12:27pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 10:07am
Story Leftovers: GNOME Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 10:03am
Story Leftovers: Graphics Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 9:57am
Story Reglue Seeks ’12 Geeks of Christmas’ Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:03am
Story Samsung to pay Apple $290m for patent infringement Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 7:54am
Story Could Mozilla become a branch of Google? Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 7:51am

A Quick Look At Facebook's Open Source

Filed under
Software The other week, when representatives from Facebook mentioned that they'd be open-sourcing significant portions of their platform, I hazarded a guess that they would be providing at most a set of APIs. Now that Facebook's actually released some code under the aegis of the Facebook Open Platform, I had a look-see.

Canonical Releases Ubuntu for Netbooks

Filed under
Ubuntu The paint has barely dried on Ubuntu 8.04 when Canonical announced at the Computex trade show in Taiwan on June 3rd that it will be releasing a new version of Ubuntu 8.04 just for Intel Atom-based netbooks and UMPCs (Ultra Mobile PCs).

Upgrading to Slackware 12.1

Filed under
Slack Pat Volkerding and the Slackware team released the latest version of Slackware Linux, 12.1, on May 2. Even though it is a "point one" release, the list of new features reads like what other distributions would consider a major new version.

Linux Podcasts Roundup

Filed under
Linux I have been working pretty hard lately, mainly coding some personal projects. I always used to listen to music whilst coding, these days I tend to listen to podcasts. Is that sad? Maybe, maybe not. Either way, I thought I would post a list of Linux and Ubuntu related podcasts which I listen to on a regular basis.

Linux: You Get What You Paid For (When You Bought Windows)

Filed under
Linux If you've been an Open Source advocate for any significant amount of time, you've no doubt heard someone say, with a sneer in their voice, "You get what you pay for". Let it be noted, I really hate that cliche.

openSUSE 11: Ubuntu Killer?

Filed under
SUSE I have been an avid openSUSE user in the past as it worked perfectly on my main workstation. However, I switched to Xubuntu as I'm more obsessed with speed and simplicity nowadays more than anything else.

Ubuntu Server receives positive reviews

Filed under
Ubuntu Ubuntu isn’t just for desktops. Behind the scenes, corporate IT managers have put Ubuntu to work on servers. Don’t believe me? Well, I can name names. I can also tell you up front that Ubuntu Server gets high marks for its corporate support; easy backups, installs and upgrades; documentation, and more.

OpenSUSE 11 RC1: The Mercedes-Benz to Ubuntu’s Volkswagen

Filed under
SUSE 2008 will be a very good vintage for community end-user Linux distributions. I must admit, however, to having a particularly strong interest in OpenSUSE, Novell’s entry into the community Linux distro fray.

Five things I hate about Linux

Filed under

blogs.ittoolbox: You all know that I am an advocate of Linux. I have even been called a fan boy and a Linux shill. That's fine. People can call me what they want. However there are some things about Linux that add a few extra lines to the forehead. Here are the five things I most hate about Linux.

Open Source Software Shows Its Muscle

Filed under
OSS Two recent events should give for-profit companies new reasons to re-evaluate the ways in which they use open source software as well as the extent to which they use it.

More Pleasant Surprises with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu As I continue to test and work with Ubuntu, I have come across a few more very pleasant surprises:

today's leftovers

Filed under
  • RedOffice 4.0 Beta - A great new UI?

  • Geek Gang Signs
  • ProcessMaker uses open source inside and out
  • Why Linux won the embedded market?
  • Make your linux ubuntu look like a mac
  • Ubuntu Guide For Windows Users: Clear And Disable Recent Documents
  • The #1 bug in my ~14 years of Linux
  • Put icons in your Fluxbox menu
  • openSUSE touch to PulseAudio
  • openSUSE Board Elections Committee
  • It's official: Open source makes you happy
  • Ubuntu Linux Live CD: I Haz It
  • Mozilla-Central: Open For Business
  • Lindependence 2008 The countdown starts
  • The Top Security Tools in the Ubuntu Repositories you may not know about

some howtos:

Filed under
  • Expert's guide to configuring Conky

  • IBM Lotus Symphony 1 on Ubuntu
  • Recording in Ubuntu, Part 1
  • Delegate privileges to users with sudo
  • Fedora 9 Tips and Tricks
  • OpenSUSE Linux 10.3: Signing Self-Generated SSL Certificates as Your Own Certificate Authority
  • Quick and Dirty MySQL Backup

A Profusion of Minis

  • A Profusion of Minis

  • ASUS Eee Box Preview & Intel's Atom Benchmarked
  • Asus Eee PC 1000 vs Atom-based 901 vs original 701... fight!
  • Acer aspires to lead low-cost laptop race

How To Set Up WebDAV With Apache2 On Debian Etch

Filed under

This guide explains how to set up WebDAV with Apache2 on a Debian Etch server. WebDAV stands for Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning and is a set of extensions to the HTTP protocol that allow users to directly edit files on the Apache server so that they do not need to be downloaded/uploaded via FTP.

Foresight Linux Review

Filed under
Linux Foresight Linux was supplied on the most recent Linux Format Magazine disc. I gave it 1 GB of RAM and started her off. I read on the website that Foresight is meant to be easy for the end user and is also supposed to showcase the latest Gnome programs.

Ubuntu 7.10 to PCLinuxOS 2008

Filed under
Linux I was looking through my pile of install CDs, and I came across PCLinuxOS 2008, which I’d downloaded a few weeks previously, and I’d been meaning to try out. “So why not try it out on this laptop?” said the evil part of my brain — the same part which forces me to spend time on Facebook instead of working.

'48 Hours' to focus on Hans Reiser murder trial

Filed under
Reiser A national news show will air an hour program chronicling the murder case and trial of computer programmer Hans Reiser CBS's 48 Hours Mystery is set to air "Betrayal," Tuesday night at 9 p.m. on local channel CBS 5.

Barracuda Tries to Gobble-Up SourceFire

Filed under

Over the last few years there has been a lot of fanfare around open source companies and their liquidation events. Most of the news has been around Sun’s billion dollar acquisition of MySQL or the Citrix acquisition of Xen and even Yahoo’s acquisition of Zimbra. Recently, SourceFire has been in the news a bit lately as Barracuda Networks has made a bid for their open source competitor.

Desktop Linux Face-Off: Ubuntu 8.04 vs. Fedora 9

Filed under
Linux The recent releases of Ubuntu 8.04 and Fedora 9--two top Linux distributions--mark another step forward in the evolution of the Linux desktop. I've been running both of them to see which offers the better blend of usability and advanced features.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.

OSS in the Back End

  • AtScale Delivers Findings on BI-Plus-Hadoop
    Business intelligence is the dominant use-case for IT organizations implementing Hadoop, according to a report from the folks at AtScale. The benchmark study also shows which tools in the Haddop ecosystem are best for particular types of BI queries. As we've reported before, tools that demystify and function as useful front-ends and connectors for the open source Hadoop project are much in demand. AtScale, billed as “the first company to allow business users to do business intelligence on Hadoop,” focused its study on the strengths and weaknesses of the industry’s most popular analytical engines for Hadoop – Impala, SparkSQL, Hive and Presto.
  • Study Says OpenStack at Scale Can Produce Surprising Savings
    Revenues from OpenStack-based businesses are poised to grow by 35 percent a year to more than $5 billion by 2020, according to analysts at 451 Research. In its latest Cloud Price Index, 451 Research analyzes the costs associated with using various cloud options to determine when it becomes better value to use a self-managed private cloud instead of public or managed cloud services. The idea is to createa complex pricing model that takes into consideration the major factors impacting total cost of ownership (TCO), including salaries and workload requirements.The 451 study found that because of the prevalence of suitably qualified administrators, commercial private cloud offerings such as VMware and Microsoft currently offer a lower TCO when labor efficiency is below 400 virtual machines managed per engineer. But where labor efficiency is greater than this, OpenStack becomes more financially attractive. In fact, past this tipping point, all private cloud options are cheaper than both public cloud and managed private cloud options.
  • How OpenStack mentoring breaks down cultural barriers
    Victoria Martinez de la Cruz is no stranger to OpenStack's mentorship opportunities. It's how she got her own start in OpenStack, and now a few years later is helping to coordinate many of these opportunities herself. She is speaking on a panel on mentoring and internships later this week at OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Spain. In this interview, we catch up with Victoria to learn more about the details of what it's like to be a part of an open source internship, as well as some helpful advice for people on both sides of the mentoring process.