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Wednesday, 23 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • customize Linux Mint 9
  • Building kernels the Debian way
  • Open UIF File (MagicISO Custom ISO Format) in Linux / MacOS X
  • Fix Window and Linux Boot Problems with the Super Grub Disk
  • [SOLVED] Can’t open /dev/dsp in Ubuntu
  • GRUB - embedding a configuration file
  • Easy desktop notification system
  • Manage Ubuntu Gnome Themes with Gstyle
  • 7 Chmod Command Examples for Beginners
  • Easiest way to install Google Chrome on Slackware
  • Mount ISO, IMG, BIN, MDF and NRG Files w Furious
  • Locking Down Firefox Preferences w new firefox.js
  • install Oracle Solaris Studio Express 6/10 on Slackware
  • Rar Unrar Support For Fedora 13 Goddard
  • Making Movies with Free Software
  • Convert any software packages to formats recognized by your distro using Alien
  • how to retrieve image size in perl
  • Privnote- A simple way to send longer messages on Twitter
  • DNS querying with dig

4 Great Alternatives to Gnome Panel Menu Bar

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: One good thing about Linux system is that you can change almost every single aspect of the system. Dislike the dull wallpaper? Change it. Not happy with the default splash screen? Change it. Getting bored of the default panel? You can change it as well.

Google's new search index: Caffeine

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Google

googleblog.blogspot: Today, we're announcing the completion of a new web indexing system called Caffeine. Caffeine provides 50 percent fresher results for web searches than our last index, and it's the largest collection of web content we've offered.

A little healthy kompetition

Filed under
Linux
Software

larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: I go back and forth between the two top desktop environments with Fedora on my Fujitsu laptop — the even numbers, as it turns out, have been GNOME and the odd (with nothing to read into this, honest) have been KDE. Since we’re now at Fedora 13, it’s KDE time.

User Interfaces Compared – Five Operating Systems, TWENTY Tests

g33q.co.za: The gauntlet has been thrown down. I have been slapped in the face with a glove. Reader response to my previous six test comparison has been very strong. More tests were suggested.

Ubuntu Control Center Makes Using Ubuntu Easier

Filed under
Software

howtogeek.com: Users who are new to Ubuntu might find it somewhat difficult to configure. Today we take a look at using Ubuntu Control Center which makes managing different aspects of the system easier.

Ubuntu Netbook Remix on the Acer Aspire One

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxjournal.com: In preparation for this year's annual motorcycle trip, I purchased an Acer Aspire One Intel Atom N450 netbook. What follows are a few notes and suggestions for installing Ubuntu Netbook Remix (UNR) 10.04.

Peppermint Team – Q&A

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

openbytes.wordpress: It was with great pleasure then that I was able to catch up with a couple of members from the Peppermint team and put to them some questions about Peppermint, their views on the future of the cloud and a variety of other subjects.

Report Card on Federal Openness

Filed under
OSS
  • Report Card on Federal Openness
  • Open Source for America Wants To Give An Openness Report Card

15 years of PHP

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Software

h-online.com: Fifteen years ago today, on the 8th of June, 1995, Rasmus Lerdorf launched PHP with a post to the comp.infosystems.www.authoring.cgi Usenet news group. He announced version 1.0 of his "Personal Home Page Tools."

linuX-gamers.net live DVD 0.9.6 released

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: We recently released a new version of our games distribution.

Ten years of IBM mainframe Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: Back in March 1991, Stewart Alsop, venture capitalist and one time editor-in-chief of InfoWorld said, "I predict that the last mainframe will be unplugged on March 15, 1996." In 2010, while IBM doesn't break out its profits by individual server line, IBM's systems and technology group, reported 1st quarter revenue of $3.4 billion.

Nautilus Elementary Just Won't Stop Improving

Filed under
Software

techdrivein.com: In our previous post we had a detailed discussion on what is nautilus elementary and how to install nautlius elementary in ubuntu using PPA. That was just a week ago. And already a number of important updates. Let's see what are the changes.

Linux Mint 9 review

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Mint 9, aka Isadora, is the latest update to the desktop-focused, Linux distribution based on Ubuntu (10.04). It is one of the more exciting desktop distributions, with a nice selection of custom-developed graphical management utilities.

Six Distributions, one HP 2133 Mini-Note

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: My HP 2133 Mini-Note with WSVGA (1024x600) display has been out on loan for several months. It came back a week or so ago, and as it had missed the latest wave of Linux distribution updates, I decided to reload it from scratch.

GNU/Linux: The Name Game

Filed under
Linux

I have been asked several times why I do not refer to Linux as "GNU/Linux," or "the GNU/Linux operating system," or some variation thereof. Most of you are well aware of the controversy around using the term "Linux," but many people who have recently switched are likely confused.

Ubuntu to decommission IA64 port

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu to decommission SPARC port, IA64 port in jeopardy
  • Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat Won't Run On Processors Below i686

Installing Apache2 With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Ubuntu 10.04 (LAMP)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

LAMP is short for Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP. This tutorial shows how you can install an Apache2 webserver on an Ubuntu 10.04 server with PHP5 support (mod_php) and MySQL support.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • ZFS for the Linux kernel
  • X Server 1.9 Window Closing After RandR 1.4 Pull
  • Lucid Productive Wallpaper
  • BSDMag: Jun 6 BSD Firewalls
  • Linux crash on a Plane
  • Those Perfect Desktop Articles
  • Vivia: user-friendly video editing
  • DeaDBeeF - Ultimate Music Player For GNU/Linux
  • GNU Accessibility Statement
  • LiVES: realtime video performance and non-linear editing
  • Is Open Source Safe?
  • MeeGo, Android, ChromeOS - Signs of Linux REALLY Going Mainstream?
  • Hacking for Freedom
  • Trust: the catalyst of the open source way
  • What exactly is a Freedom Outlaw?
  • Patent Absurdity mailed to 200 policy setters
  • Meet the GIMP Episode 142: Waterfront
  • Friends of FLOSS: HP Printers
  • A Comparative Performance Analysis of Longene VS Wine

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Launch Nautilus, Programs in openSUSE as Root
  • Fixing Logitech (pwc) webcam hang in Linux Mint / Ubuntu
  • OOo: Select Background Image
  • Adding clip art to the OpenOffice gallery
  • GIMP: Old Blue Eyes
  • Record internet radio using VLC
  • [SOLVED] Media Playing issues in Ubuntu 10.10
  • split a large file
  • Bash Shell Expansion within Braces
  • Adding directories to your PATH
  • Uploading files with Curl
  • CountBeats—BPM Finder
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More in Tux Machines

Zuul: Proven open-source continuous integration/continuous delivery

If you think Zuul is the Gatekeeper, demigod, and minion of the ancient Hittite god Gozer, then you're a Ghostbusters fan, too. But, if you're interested in continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) and not "human sacrifice, dogs, and cats living together... mass hysteria," then you want Zuul, OpenStack's open-source CI/CD platform. Zuul originally was developed for OpenStack CI testing. For years, OpenStack, the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, got all the attention. Over time, people began to realize that as impressive as OpenStack was, the CI system behind it, which enabled contributors and users across many different organizations to work and develop quickly together across multiple projects, was impressive in its own right. Read more

Smallest RK3399 hacker board yet ships at $129 with 4GB DDR4

FriendlyElec has launched a 100 x 64mm, $129 “NanoPC-T4” SBC that runs Android or Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 with 4G DDR4, native GbE, WiFi-ac, DP, HDMI 2.0, 0 to 80℃ support, and M.2 and 40-pin expansion. FriendlyElec has released its most powerful and priciest hacker board to date, which it promotes as being the smallest RK3399-based SBC on the market. The 100 x 64mm NanoPC-T4 opens with a $129 discount price with the default 4GB DDR4 and 16GB eMMC. Although that will likely rise in the coming months, it’s still priced in the middle range of open spec RK3399 SBCs. Read more

today's leftovers

  • How to dual-boot Linux and Windows
    Even though Linux is a great operating system with widespread hardware and software support, the reality is that sometimes you have to use Windows, perhaps due to key apps that won't run under Linux. Thankfully, dual-booting Windows and Linux is very straightforward—and I'll show you how to set it up, with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 18.04, in this article. Before you get started, make sure you've backed up your computer. Although the dual-boot setup process is not very involved, accidents can still happen. So take the time to back up your important files in case chaos theory comes into play. In addition to backing up your files, consider taking an image backup of the disk as well, though that's not required and can be a more advanced process.
  • Weather Forecasting Gets A Big Lift In Japan
    This is a lot more compute capacity than JMA has had available to do generic weather forecasting as well as do predictions for typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions – the weather forecasting alone is predicted to run 10X faster, according to Cray.
  • Bitwarden Password Manager Adds Command Line Vault
    Bitwarden, the secure, open source password manager we talked about recently, added a command line tool to its list of apps you can use to access your passwords. Bitwarden CLI is currently in public beta testing, and according to its documentation, it includes all the features available in other Bitwarden client applications, like the desktop or browser extension.
  • GSoC’18 Week 1
    The first week of the coding period was great and I got to learn a lot of new things. My mentors help me on every stage and the work is going on as planne [...] Improvement in the overall UI is still in progress. Other than this, I have been working on refactoring the current code for this activity and breaking the whole code into various elements. For the next week, my main task is to complete the overall UI of this activity and add more geometries for drawing.
  • Time to Test Plasma 5.13 Beta
    The forthcoming new release of Plasma 5.13 will have some lovely new features such as rewritten System Settings pages and Plasma Browser Integration. But we need testers. Incase you missed it the Plasma 5.13 release announce has a rundown of the main features. If you are an auditory learner you can listen to the Late Night Linux Extra podcast where Jonathan “great communicator” Riddell talks about the recent sprint and the release.
  • GSoC students are already hacking!
    We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)
  • CryptoFest a openSUSE Conference již tento víkend v Praze
  • openSUSE Conference a CryptoFest 2018
  • Aaeon reveals two rugged, Linux-ready embedded PCs
    Aaeon unveiled two Linux-friendly embedded systems: an “AIOT-IP6801” gateway equipped with an Apollo Lake-based UP Squared SBC with WiFi and LoRa, and a “Boxer-8120AI” mini-PC with an Nvidia Jetson TX2 module and 4x GbE ports. Aaeon announced that three of its Linux-ready embedded systems have won Computex d&j awards, including two previously unannounced models: an Intel Apollo Lake based AIOT-IP6801 gateway based on Aaeon’s community-backed UP Squared board, as well as a Boxer-8120AI embedded computer built around an Arm-based Jetson TX2 module.
  • Last Call for Purism's Librem 5 Dev Kits, Git Protocol Version 2 Released, LXQt Version 0.13.0 Now Available and More
    Purism announces last call for its Librem 5 dev kits. If you're interested in the hardware that will be the platform for the Librem 5 privacy-focused phones, place your order by June 1, 2018. The dev kit is $399, and it includes "screen, touchscreen, development mainboard, cabling, power supply and various sensors (free worldwide shipping)".

Programming: GNU Parallel, Rust, Go