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Monday, 03 Aug 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story How to truly fuel the adoption of Open Source srlinuxx 09/05/2010 - 9:37pm
Story Much ado about nothing srlinuxx 09/05/2010 - 7:37pm
Story The State Of Mac And GNU/Linux Gaming srlinuxx 09/05/2010 - 7:35pm
Story Frankenstein’s Netbook srlinuxx 09/05/2010 - 3:59pm
Story Sony is Now Facing a Total of 3 Lawsuits Over Other OS Renoval srlinuxx 09/05/2010 - 3:57pm
Story LinuX Gamers Live – A Revolution in Linux Gaming srlinuxx 09/05/2010 - 3:55pm
Story Desktop Drapes for GNOME srlinuxx 09/05/2010 - 3:54pm
Story 5 Things Easier To Do In The Command Line srlinuxx 09/05/2010 - 3:52pm
Story today's odds & ends: srlinuxx 1 09/05/2010 - 11:31am
Story The Perfect Server - Ubuntu 10.04 falko 09/05/2010 - 11:19am

Moving Away from Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ever [since] I tried a Fedora build for programming purposes a few years back, I was interested in this alternate operating system, and the benefits it offered. Now that my new laptop has arrived, the time was right for a fresh operating system for my fresh laptop. Enter Ubuntu my new best friend.

KDE Celebrates 10 Years of the Free Desktop

Filed under
KDE

Yesterday at 10:00 AM the president of the KDE e.V. Eva Brucherseifer welcomed the audience of the presentation track at the KDE anniversary event at the Technische Akademie Esslingen (TAE) in Ostfildern near Stuttgart, Germany. Keynote speakers were Matthias Ettrich, founder of the KDE project, as well as Klaus Knopper of Knoppix fame. During their presentations they looked back at KDE's successful past 10 years and they offered their thoughts about the future of KDE and Free Software.

How to compile and install a program from source

Filed under
HowTos

Regardless of what system you use or which package manager comes with your distribution, compiling a program from the source code is one option that will work across all platforms. Don't be hesitant to compile software - this is one of Linux and BSD's strong points.

ATI X1000 + fglrx Q4/06 Update

Filed under
Software

It has been six months since ATI Technologies had introduced Radeon X1000 support in their Linux fglrx display drivers. But how has the support evolved with their monthly driver releases? At Phoronix we have retested the last six display drivers with a Radeon X1k product to answer this question.

Scaling the Windows vs. Linux Chasm

Filed under
OS

There's a popular notion swirling around the high-tech sector that Microsoft's dominant position in the industry and software bugs have customers scurrying for the cover of Linux.

F-Prot Antivirus with Web Interface

Filed under
HowTos

F-Prot Antivirus for Linux was especially developed to effectively eradicate viruses threatening workstations running Linux. It provides full protection against macro viruses and other forms of malicious software - including Trojans

What do dependencies have to do with Free Software?

Filed under
OSS

There is one huge difference between the free and non-free software that has some very practical implications in the way we use it. One of those implications are the dependencies between single software packages in the free software model. What do they have to do with the free software philosophy and why should not you be afraid of them?

On stage at Opera Backstage

As an industry leader in providing innovative, usable and secure Web browsing, Opera Software is an active participant in industry-related events around the world. In London, October 17, 2006, Speakers will include some of the most prominent names from Opera and the UK Web technology community.

Getting bored with 3D desktops? I'm definitely not!

Filed under
Software

I’m (AGAIN) updating my 3D desktop article. This time, I’ll answer some comments I have seen appear in response to the two previous incarnations of this very same article, as well as revise (further) some of the content.

Firefox: Mission Accomplished

Filed under
Moz/FF

When the folks from Mozilla prepared to launch their open-source Firefox 1.0 browser two years ago, their hope was to gain enough market share to compel Web sites to adopt open standards--rather than standardizing on Microsoft's proprietary Internet Explorer browser technology. Job done.

Happy Birthday KDE

Filed under
KDE

It's party time. Today we celebrate the tenth birthday of KDE. It all started with the famous post by Matthias Ettrich on October 14th 1996 calling for programmers to create a piece of free software he called KDE. I digged up the oldest screenshot of a program I worked on that I could find, a KOrganizer version from 1998, this was just before KDE 1.0.

Q&A: GP2X chief Craig Rothwell

Filed under
Gaming

The GP2X--which stands for 'Game Park Times Two'--was first released in the UK this year as an alternative portable that runs on Linux. The portable underdog reports surge in interest in the UK and first big-budget game release; sales expected to reach 50,000 by Christmas.

Why I Choose PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

There's been quite a few postings and articles on new users and Linux flourishing during the past year. The reason I believe this to be is that desktop Linux is approaching or has arrived at the tipping point where it can gain mainstream adoption. People are seeing Linux as a viable alternative to Microsoft.

Firefox accepting feature suggestions for version 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Firefox web browser has come a long way since the project was announced as a fork from the open-sourced Mozilla project. The Mozilla organization has set up a feature brainstorming web site that allows everyone to enter their favorite wish lists for the open source browser.

Getting Your Ubuntu Box Safely Up To Speed

Filed under
Ubuntu

As a long-time fan of SuSE Linux, I somehow managed to miss the Ubuntu bandwagon. Now I know what I was missing. I recently replaced SuSE 10.1 with Ubuntu 6.06, also known as Dapper Drake, on my main PC in a matter of minutes, and am now enjoying a clean, feature-rich computing environment that is easy to configure and just works.

Hans Reiser's Software Could Be Phased Out

Filed under
Linux
Reiser

The arrest of Hans Reiser in connection with the murder of his estranged wife is having a ripple effect on the technology world. Because Reiser is the backbone of Namesys, the software's parent company, many wonder what his arrest will mean for the software's future.

Ron Hovsepian: CEO Vision of Linux

Filed under
Linux

It's important not to get too carried away with "the latest tech trend." Technology changes more rapidly than any other sector, and this year's "must have" technology is quickly made obsolete, or so it seems. However, every so often something significant comes along that truly changes the game. Mainframes yielded to client/server, which in turn was replaced by the Web as the dominant computing paradigm. I believe Linux and Open Source more broadly represent a similar game-changing force.

COMPUTER CORNER: Linux provides systems for Christians

Filed under
Linux

Operating systems for Christians? Sound silly? It may sound silly but it's true. Recently, two versions of Linux have come out geared towards the Christian faith. One is called Ubuntu Christian Edition and the other is Ichthux.

Let the Browser Wars begin

Filed under
Software

Firefox 2.0 is almost here, and Microsoft is expected to start pushing out Internet Explorer 7 to users via the Windows Automatic Update software-distribution mechanism by year's end. In short, the browser wars are about to begin again.

Who's Driving That Bus?

Filed under
OSS

It's Friday the 13th, and for some of us in the Western world it's a day where we walk a little more carefully. I enjoy delving into mysteries of the universe around us. The most prominent example of this is the GPL 2 vs. 3 debate, which seems to have some people convinced that it's the End of Linux kernel as We Know It.

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