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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story openSUSE 12.1 Beta taking more time to become good srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 8:58pm
Story Kororaa 15 Unleashed srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 8:57pm
Story Red Hat Q2 Profit Rises - Quick Facts srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 8:56pm
Story Latest Hedgewars Release Adds 3D Rendering srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 6:13pm
Story Asunder Rips and Encodes Audio Without the Bloody Mess srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 6:10pm
Story Best Webcam Software Applications for Linux srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 6:08pm
Story Richard Hughes on color management in Linux and GNOME srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 6:05pm
Story Free ‘Ubuntu Software Centre’ Guide Released srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 6:03pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 6:25am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 21/09/2011 - 6:11am

First Look: Firefox 3 Alpha 4

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla has reached another milestone in the development of Firefox 3, releasing version alpha 4 over the weekend. As with the previous alpha releases, Gran Paradiso Alpha 4 is intended primarily for the developer community and is not yet ready for prime-time use.

Alpha 4 brings a number of new enhancements to Firefox 3, which we outlined yesterday.

Dell to choose Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Officially, Dell Inc. hasn't said a word yet about which Linux it will be preloading on its desktops and laptops. Several sources within Dell, however, have told DesktopLinux.com that Dell's desktop Linux pick is going to be Ubuntu.

Review of PCLinuxOS 2007 Test Release 4

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

I find it hard to explain why I love PClinuxOS as much as I do, especially considering the other day when I decided to drop into Ubuntu to perform some basic tasks. PCLinuxOS is an excellent release and PCLOS2007 is looking like a real contender for most usable Linux 2007. Let's see how test release 4 behaves.

Reject Windows addiction, says advocate

Filed under
Microsoft

Outspoken Australian free software advocate Con Zymaris has labelled Microsoft's plan to offer Windows for $3 dollars to developing nations as an attempt to "addict" users to Microsoft software.

WHY is the transition from Windows to Linux easy for some people?

Filed under
Linux

After I'd closed the lid on the "Ubuntu is not Linux" , uh, mess, Eric over at Binary World has taken up the idea and tried to grapple with it. I don't know, maybe I should dig it up and check for a pulse. But I'm thinking again... (that's always a dangerous sign!)

Here's the nut of the matter: moving from Windows to Linux is easy for some people and hard for others. WHY?

New mutt 1.5.15 has a very nice new feature!

Filed under
Software

Just found today when I was looking to see if I missed something with the mutt sidebar patch (still irritates me that I have to sync a mailbox before jumping to another mailbox in order for the counts in the sidebar to be updated properly), that mutt 1.5.15 was released earlier this month. This is an extremely worthwhile upgrade, especially because it now has SMTP support built-in.

Introducing Ubuntu’s Add/Remove Packages

Filed under
HowTos

Last week, my fellow FOSSwire blogger Jacob introduced you to APT, the powerful package management system that is underneath Ubuntu.

The command line interface is the most powerful way to manipulate the software installed on your system, but to users who aren’t familiar with a command line interface, it can be a bit daunting.

Standard Office

Filed under
KDE

June 21th 2005 was the day KOffice released version 1.4. I highlight that release because it was the first release where KOffice switched its native format to the OpenDocument Format. That would become an official ISO standard in May 2006.

PCLinuxOS Magazine May 2007 Issue 9 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

It is my privilege to announce on behalf of the team members of the PCLinuxOS Magazine Project sponsored by MyPCLinuxOS.com, the May 2007 issue (#9) is available for download!

Some highlights include:

1. KDE User Guide Part 2
2. Scroogle and Konqueror Integration
3. Top Ten Reasons for Using Linux
4. Linux in Education
5. Updating PCLinuxOS to 2007

Japanese schools may convert aging computers to Linux

Filed under
Linux

A recent article in OhMyNews.com discusses the results of a conference in Tokyo at which educators recommended converting aging computers running Windows 98 and ME to Linux. About 400,000 such machines exist in Japan's public schools and either can't run more up-to-date operating systems or the cost of upgrade is prohibitive.

One man writes Linux drivers for 352 USB webcams

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

A LONE HOBBYIST programmer sitting at his home in France is responsible for adding 352 USB webcams to the list of those supported by Linux. He tells the INQUIRER about this often unknown and unrecognised achievement.

Inside the Microsoft-Novell deal

Filed under
SUSE

The uproar in the open-source community caused by proprietary poster-child Microsoft's deal with Linux provider Novell shows no sign of abating. For many, it's a betrayal of the fundamental ethos of free and open software — a pact with the devil.

DNS server Setup using bind

Filed under
HowTos

DNS Stands for Domain Name Service.On the Internet, the Domain Name Service (DNS) stores and associates many types of information with domain names; most importantly, it translates domain names (computer hostnames) to IP addresses. It also lists mail exchange servers accepting e-mail for each domain.

Ubuntu on Thinkpad X41 - Upgrading to Feisty Fawn (7.04)

Filed under
Ubuntu

This is one of a number of posts detailing how to install Ubuntu 6.10 (codename Edgy) on a Thinkpad X41. This post focuses on upgrading from Ubuntu Edgy Eft (version 6.10) to Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (version 7.04).

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 200

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to the 200th issue of DistroWatch Weekly.

The KDE 3.5 Control Center - Part 5 - Peripherals

Filed under
KDE

Welcome to part 5 of our series on the KDE 3.5 Control Center. Today we'll be covering the Peripherals section of the Control Center, an area that controls all your most important external add on devices, such as your monitor, printer, keyboard and more. Let's look at each of these sections and get a good idea of what each does and how it affects your user experience.

Setup Your Linux Box as an NTP Server

Filed under
HowTos

I believe that every organization should have a NTP/time server if they have more than one computer on site. Having an NTP server will allow you to keep the times on all of your computers in sync. This helps when comparing the logs from various servers to trace through various events that happened.

Interview: Sam Hocevar, new Debian Project Leader

Filed under
Interviews

Sam Hocevar recently became the next Debian Project Leader (DPL), defeating seven other candidates while running on a platform that emphasized ways to improve how project members interact. Hocevar's election comes at a time when Debian may be losing mindshare among both users and developers to Ubuntu, and looking for ways to improve its efficiencies and to mend internal divisions.

A couple of minor ext3 performance tweaks

Filed under
HowTos

The ext3 filesystem is probably the most common filesystem used upon GNU/Linux machines. It isn't necessarily the fastest, the best, or the most modern filesystem but it does perform adequately for the majority of users.

What’s a newbie to do?

Filed under
Linux

Many more people are becoming interested in GNU/Linux, as even seasoned Microsoft users and advocates are beginning to question the issues surrounding the latest operating system from Redmond. The variety of GNU/Linux distributions, while a good thing, can make a difficult time for a user, especially a new user.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Linux Development and LinuxCon

  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success
    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto. Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked. "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?" What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."
  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel
    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.
  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history
    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux. Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.
  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer
    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack. Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver