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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 23 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Google Nexus 6 review: A larger Moto X with fewer Motorola enhancements Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 4:46pm
Story Hands-on with Linux Mint 17.1 Cinnamon and MATE Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 4:38pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 12:54pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 12:53pm
Story GNU Releases Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 11:05am
Story Linux Mint 17.1 Cinnamon and MATE Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 10:32am
Story Fedora 21 vs. Ubuntu 14.10 Performance Benchmarks Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 3:50am
Story Linux 3.18-rc7 Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 3:48am
Story A Week in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 2:00am
Story Systemd 217 Updated In Debian & Soon Making Its Way To Ubuntu 15.04 Rianne Schestowitz 30/11/2014 - 10:05pm

Video: Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux

redhatmagazine.com: Fedora 10 is out, and to celebrate that milestone, Fedora Project leader Paul Frields sat down with Red Hat community guru Greg DeKoenigsberg to talk about where Fedora’s been over the past five years and where it’s going.

A media player for the times: Songbird

Filed under
Software

mozillalinks.org: After about two years in the works, Pioneers of the Inevitable have released Songbird, a Mozilla-based music player, with which, POTI aims to do for music what Mozilla did with Firefox: provide an open source customizable multiplatform music player.

10 Ways To Trick Out Your Netbook for Free

Filed under
Software

gigaom.com: Netbooks are all the rage at the moment, with Asus predicting that it will sell 5 million of its Asus Eee PC netbooks by the end of this year. In this post, you’ll find 10 ways to pimp out your Windows or Linux netbook, without breaking the hardware resources bank.

Mingle brings group video chat to Linux

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The developers at Collabora have extended Jingle—a multimedia chat protocol for XMPP—so that it can support audio and video conversations with more than two participants. Support for this new XMPP extension, which they call Mingle, could eventually land in Empathy, the GNOME instant messaging client.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Yes, Linux can run Crysis!

  • Microsoft Should Worry Less About Live, More About Linux
  • I Want Sandy Back, Says Open Source Project
  • WiMAX deal "clears" Linux for takeoff
  • Yet another reason to use Linux instead of (Windows) Vista
  • From Evolution to Thunderbird (Part II)
  • Tux on a Groom's Cake
  • Q & A: Keith Curtis on Open Source
  • Nokia eyes wider use of Linux software in phones
  • SilverStone Fortress FT01
  • The Linux Newb: The Install
  • Mozilla Developer News Dec 02
  • Gentoo New Mplayer Real Support, dvdnav support
  • OpenOffice's UI will be getting a refurb
  • Reason to stay with Ubuntu 8.04
  • MySQL 5.1 released with crashing bugs
  • 40 Open Source Tools for Protecting Your Privacy
  • Blender Render Grid
  • Trumpet Windows Loudly--- Except When It's Malware Outbreaks
  • Open source phone gains "fat" distro

some howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • The Best Way To View Youtube in Ubuntu

  • OMG! I am running out of memory. What to do?
  • Hidden Linux : Doing the joins
  • Predicting Solaris 10 TCP Sequence Numbers Part 1: Initial Discovery
  • urpmi tricks
  • Keeping an eye on your network with PasTmon
  • Using Linux to Overcome Comcast's Policy of FUD
  • HowTo use Dig to check if a DNS server is using random source ports
  • Gentoo, build it like Lego.
  • Vim as typewriting tutor
  • Different signal handling under FreeBSD and Linux
  • Mandriva : Fixing input drivers issues in Cooker
  • Add right-click virus scanning capability to Nautilus
  • Where is All The Disk Space Going?
  • Dealing with Command Line Options in Python

Open-source developers set out software road map for 2020

Filed under
OSS

linuxworld.com (IDG): A group of open-source software advocates set out a road map for the software industry through 2020 at the Open World Forum conference in Paris on Tuesday.

Various Mandriva Things

Filed under
MDV

Frederik's Blog: Mandriva decided to end the contracts of at least Adam Williamson, Mandriva's community manager and Oden Eriksson, maintainer of the Apache, MySQL, PHP stack and other related packages. This has triggered a haevy reaction from the community now, with a public letter to the CEO being written, an online petition and people deciding not to spend money anymore to Mandriva, but instead spent it on other free software projects.

Konqueror is losing my conquest.

Filed under
KDE

it.toolbox.com/blogs: KDE comes with the everything including the kitchen sink konqueror program which acts as a file manager and browser although the file management part is being slowly replaced by dolphin. This leaves konquerors role to be primarily a web browser.

Silverlight for Linux : Moonlight 1.0 almost complete

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: The beta version of Moonlight 1.0 is now available to download as a Firefox plug-in. The application, is the Linux version of Microsoft's rival to Flash, Silverlight. It makes it possible to play files such as WMV files under Linux.

NVIDIA 180.11 Linux Driver Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: This afternoon, NVIDIA has pushed out another driver. The 180.11 Beta brings in a couple of fixes and improvements.

Open Source iTunes Competitor Songbird Officially Released

Filed under
Software

blog.wired.com: Songbird is like an open source version of iTunes that handles just about everything that program does, while swapping out the iTunes store interface in favor of the world's music blogs.

Hands-on: KDE 4.2 beta 1 brings impressive improvements

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: The first beta release of KDE 4.2, the next major version in the KDE 4 series, was made available for download last week. Thousands of bugs have been fixed since the 4.1 release and many aspects of the environment are starting to feel very smooth and polished.

Whassup with Netbooks?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.zdnet.com: It has suddenly become fashionable to diss the Netbook. Some of the blame goes to Intel, which didn’t understand who its buyers might be.

Excelixis 1.0: A new workbench

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Excelixis is the awkwardly-renamed latest version of what was previously known as Workbench Linux. I liked that distro very much, so I was curious to see what (if any) improvements had been made.

Mozilla slates second Firefox 3.0 auto-update this week

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. said today that it will take another stab this week at convincing users running older versions of its Firefox browser to update to Version 3.0.

OpenSolaris 2008.11 is ready

Filed under
OS

heise-online.co.uk: The OpenSolaris project developers have released the final version 2008.11, four weeks after the release candidate and in line with their six-monthly release cycle. Apart from Firefox 3, Gnome 2.24 and OpenOffice 3, which are mainly intended for desktop use, the operating system also offers a complete web stack.

Three graphical mount managers

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Mounting and unmounting filesystems used to be straightforward in GNU/Linux. However, with the addition of udev and the demand for hotswapping USB devices the process is now more complicated. That is where graphical mount managers such as Forelex Mount Manager, PySDM, and MountManager find their niche.

Fedora Project Taking Ideas For Next Release Name

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Distribution naming schemes are one of the more humorous aspects of the open source community. The Fedora Project is calling for suggestions on what to name Fedora 11.

Debian Project News - December 2nd

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's 16th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include: Etch-and-a-half installation images updated, GNU Affero General Public License suitable for Debian main, and Security Teams Meeting in Essen.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Perl, JavaScript, Ick, PowerFake, pylint-django, nbdkit filters

  • An Open Letter to the Perl Community

    Some consider Perl 6 to be a sister language to Perl 5. Personally, I consider Perl 6 more of a genetically engineered daughter language with the best genes from many parents. A daughter with a difficult childhood, in which she alienated many, who is now getting out of puberty into early adulthood. But I digress.

  • Long Live Perl 5!

    While not mentioned in the original Letter, a frequent theme in the comments was that Perl 6 should be renamed, as the name is inaccurate or is damaging.

    This is the topic on which I wrote more than once and those who have been following closely know that, yes, many (but by no means all) in the Perl 6 community acknowledge the name is detrimental to both Perl 6 and Perl 5 projects.

    This is why with a nod of approval from Larry we're moving to create an alias to Perl 6 name during 6.d language release, to be available for marketing in areas where "Perl 6" is not a desirable name.

  • JavaScript Trends for 2018
    Trying to bet on how many new JavaScript frameworks will be released each month, is, the best software engineer’s game in the past 5 years.
  • Ick: a continuous integration system
    TL;DR: Ick is a continuous integration or CI system. See http://ick.liw.fi/ for more information.
  • Introducing PowerFake for C++
    PowerFake is a new mini-framework/tool to make it possible to fake/mock free functions and static & non-virtual member functions in C++. It requires no change to the code under test, but it might need some structural changes, like moving some parts of the code to a different .cpp file; or making inline functions non-inline when built for testing. It is useful for writing unit tests and faking/mocking functions which should not/cannot be run during a test case. Some say that such a feature is useful for existing code, but should not be needed for a code which is written testable from the beginning. But, personally I don’t agree that it is always appropriate to inject such dependencies using virtual interfaces or templates. Currently, it is not supposed to become a mocking framework on its own. I hope that I can integrate PowerFake into at least one existing C++ mocking framework. Therefore, currently it doesn’t provide anything beyond faking existing functions.
  • Introducing pylint-django 0.8.0
    Since my previous post was about writing pylint plugins I figured I'd let you know that I've released pylint-django version 0.8.0 over the weekend. This release merges all pull requests which were pending till now so make sure to read the change log.
  • nbdkit filters
    nbdkit is our toolkit for creating Network Block Device (NBD) servers from “unusual” data sources. nbdkit was already configurable by writing simple plugins in several programming languages. Last week Eric Blake and I added a nice new feature: You can now modify existing plugins by placing “filters” in front of them.

Moving to Linux from dated Windows machines

Every day, while working in the marketing department at ONLYOFFICE, I see Linux users discussing our office productivity software on the internet. Our products are popular among Linux users, which made me curious about using Linux as an everyday work tool. My old Windows XP-powered computer was an obstacle to performance, so I started reading about Linux systems (particularly Ubuntu) and decided to try it out as an experiment. Two of my colleagues joined me. Read more

Security: TPM, Yubikey, Holes, Bricking and Uber

  • Trusted Computing
    The Trusted Platform Module on your computer's motherboard could lead to better security for your Linux system. The security of any operating system (OS) layer depends on the security of every layer below it. If the CPU can't be trusted to execute code correctly, there's no way to run secure software on that CPU. If the bootloader has been tampered with, you cannot trust the kernel that the bootloader boots. Secure Boot allows the firmware to validate a bootloader before executing it, but if the firmware itself has been backdoored, you have no way to verify that Secure Boot functioned correctly.
  • Locking the screen when removing a Yubikey

    I have my Yubikey on my key ring, so whenever I leave my computer, I have to remove the Yubikey. So why not lock the screen automatically?

  • Corporate cultural issues hold back secure software development

    The study of over 1,200 IT leaders, conducted by analysts Freeform Dynamics for software company CA Technologies, finds 58 percent of respondents cite existing culture and lack of skills as hurdles to being able to embed security within processes.

  • Stop installing our buggy Spectre CPU firmware fixes, Intel says
  • Uber shrugs off flaw that lets hackers bypass two-factor authentication

    Security researcher Karan Saini found the bug in Uber's two-factor authentication process, which has yet to be rolled out widely to Uber users. The flaw relates to the way an account is authenticated when users log in, meaning hackers [sic] with someone's username and password can drift pass the 2FA with ease.

Should your open source project report its social benefits?

Despite the many words written and spoken on the difference between "open source" and "free" software, few people have pointed out that discussion of these differences frequently resembles the debate surrounding the social role of business, which in recent decades has been dominated by the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The fact of the matter, however, is that organizations committed to open principles could (and should) be reporting their activities—because those activities have effects that are both economic and social. And an analysis of how this is the case might actually help us reconcile two principled positions that have more in common than they might realize. Read more