Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Command line tip - banish ‘command not found’ when using su

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: Sometimes, if you’re following a tutorial on doing something on your Linux box and you’re trying to fix something, you’ll be asked to go to a terminal and type in some commands. Often, these commands need to be run as root, the administrator.

Alternative GUIs: SymphonyOS

Filed under
Linux

We're all familiar with the "big two" desktops for Linux -- KDE and GNOME. Of course, there are many more to choose from. If you asked a group of Linux users, "Which one is best?", the ensuing debate would likely take on religious overtones. Some would even argue that a desktop like KDE is too hard for newbies to use. Still, it's a safe bet that most Linux users don't stray too far away from those "big two," KDE and GNOME. So it's especially interesting to look at some innovative alternatives.

Splitting legal hairs over the Novell-Microsoft deal

Filed under
SUSE

ComputerWorld: New provisions in the latest GPLv3 draft deal more specifically with patents, and how companies distributing software under the proposed GPLv3 can interact with other companies who distribute patented software protected by copyright law. They aim to stop future software patent deals like the one recently made by Microsoft and Novell.

Novell resolves issues with Nasdaq

Filed under
SUSE

AP via Forbes: Software developer Novell Inc. said Friday it is in compliance with Nasdaq Stock Market rules after filing several delayed financial reports.

A Patent Lie

Filed under
Microsoft

NY Times: WHAT a difference 16 years makes. Last month, the technology world was abuzz over an interview in Fortune magazine in which Bradford Smith, Microsoft’s general counsel, accused users and developers of various free software products of patent infringement and demanded royalties. Microsoft sang a very different tune in 1991.

How to disable tap-clicking with your touchpad in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

arsgeek: Lots of people have a love/hate relationship with their touch pad on their laptops. It’s great for speeding around your screen and doing lots of cool things with nary a mouse in site. It’s horrible when you accidentaly double-click that Quake 3 icon while your boss is strolling into the room.

Ubuntu Sharing on a Saturday Morning!

Filed under
Ubuntu

effiejayx’s blog: Well most kids would just do anything to sit in front of the TV on a Saturday morning with their cereal in dripping from the bowl. (I know I did back in my time Big Grin), well Not my daughter... she just loves sitting and playing with TUXPAINT.

Episode 2 - "Attack Of The Elephants (Dream)" Released ... Finally

Filed under
Interviews

thesourceshow.org: We finally got around to releasing another episode. This time we talk to Bassam Kurdali of the blender project and we have the much anticipated Cinelerra tutorial #3 in which we discuss how to do video effects.

It's Time to Consider Open Source Software, Part 1

linux insider: Free software gives everyone the freedom to run, study, change and redistribute software. It is these freedoms, not the price, that is important about free software. Free software advocates make the distinction between free, as in speech, as opposed to free, as in beer. Though many people would gladly accept a free beer, it is not one of the fundamental principles of democracy.

Howto Install E17 Enlightenment Desktop in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu geek: Enlightenment, commonly referred to as e, is a open source software X window manager primarily for Unix-like computers. Enlightenment focuses on pushing the limits of existing technologies while remaining lightweight, flexible, and beautiful.

Fedora 7 Xen First Look

Filed under
Software

enterpriselinuxlog.blogs: Having spent a few days with Fedora 7, I have found that, while still a bit buggy, the updated Xen tools show some real promise. The new version of virt-manager shows the direction that the Fedora team (and consequently Red Hat) is taking with it’s GUI virtualization management tool, and it looks very promising.

Import Thunderbird Email Into Evolution

Filed under
HowTos

debianadmin: This Tutorial will explain how you can import mails from Thunderbird to Evolution. Changing email clients can be a risky task, as you usually want to keep your old email just in case you need to refer back to it.

Gimp 2.3 (preview of 2.4)

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: In my last post, I noted that the major upgrade to Feisty as of Tribe 1 was The Gimp. Now it’s time to see what has changed in the latest installment, which will be released under the name Gimp 2.4.

Getting the most from open source

bbc: Free. It is not something Western culture does particularly well. It is certainly not something that features big in the plans of the millionaires at Microsoft, Apple and Intel - to name but a few. This week we take a look at the open source operating system Linux and make a few software recommendations.

Inside One Laptop per Child: Episode 03

Filed under
OLPC

Red Hat Mag: Since piloting this video series, we’ve received lots of questions about the XO’s mesh network. How can these laptops “talk” to each other even without widespread internet access? How is the network they create different from the network at your home or office? Episode 03 explains it all.

Pick Your Open Source Poison: Microsoft's Patent Claims Or GPLv3

Filed under
OSS

Information Week: After months of debate, the release of the next version of the General Public License, under which most open source products are issued, is imminent. The Free Software Foundation plans to issue GPL version 3 in its final form June 29. As the revised license nears completion, however, new doubts are being raised over whether it's headed in the right direction.

NVIDIA 100.14.09 Display Driver Released

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: We have previously looked at the NVIDIA 100.14.03 and 100.14.06 display drivers, but this afternoon we finally have our hands on the stable NVIDIA 100.14.09 driver. New in version 100.14.09 is added GeForce 8 and Quadro product support, improved notebook GPU support, improved RenderAccel support for sub-pixel anti-aliased fonts, added Xv brightness and contrast controls, improved interaction with newer kernels, and fixing an issue with nvidia-settings.

Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon 7.10 Tribe 1 - A Review?

Filed under
Ubuntu

shift+backspace: A couple of days ago, the first alpha (Tribe 1) of Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon 7.10 (successor to Feisty Fawn 7.04) was released. I figured I would download the Gutsy and see how it performed on my laptop.

The Linux Battle: Ubuntu vs. Fedora

Filed under
Linux

romow.com: More and more people are venturing away from Microsoft Windows and finding their way to open source operating systems. Just as more people are using them, more and more Linux distributions are available. Among the open source operating system crowd, there are 2 main contenders: Ubuntu and Fedora.

Thank You, Builders

Filed under
OSS

Linux Today: Anytime I have a fun meeting with a vendor it's a bonus; they're all nice folks, but they're not always entertaining. Some are, well, I won't say boring, but certainly dry. So whatever else Fonality has going for it, it has a fun CEO who seems excited about the company. The whole VoIP space is fascinating to me anyway, because it demonstrates the sheer power and inventiveness of open source.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

ownCloud Desktop Client 2.2.4 Released with Updated Dolphin Plugin, Bug Fixes

ownCloud is still alive and kicking, and they've recently released a new maintenance update of the ownCloud Desktop Client, version 2.2.4, bringing some much-needed improvements and patching various annoying issues. Read more

Early Benchmarks Of The Linux 4.9 DRM-Next Radeon/AMDGPU Drivers

While Linux 4.9 will not officially open for development until next week, the DRM-Next code is ready to roll with all major feature work having been committed by the different open-source Direct Rendering Manager drivers. In this article is some preliminary testing of this DRM-Next code as of 29 September when testing various AMD GPUs with the Radeon and AMDGPU DRM drivers. Linux 4.9 does bring compile-time-offered experimental support for the AMD Southern Islands GCN 1.0 hardware on AMDGPU, but that isn't the focus of this article. A follow-up comparison is being done with GCN 1.0/1.1 experimental support enabled to see the Radeon vs. AMDGPU performance difference on that hardware. For today's testing was a Radeon R7 370 to look at the Radeon DRM performance and for AMDGPU testing was the Radeon R9 285, R9 Fury, and RX 480. Benchmarks were done from the Linux 4.8 Git and Linux DRM-Next kernels as of 29 September. Read more

How to Effectively and Efficiently Edit Configuration Files in Linux

Every Linux administrator has to eventually (and manually) edit a configuration file. Whether you are setting up a web server, configuring a service to connect to a database, tweaking a bash script, or troubleshooting a network connection, you cannot avoid a dive deep into the heart of one or more configuration files. To some, the prospect of manually editing configuration files is akin to a nightmare. Wading through what seems like countless lines of options and comments can put you on the fast track for hair and sanity loss. Which, of course, isn’t true. In fact, most Linux administrators enjoy a good debugging or configuration challenge. Sifting through the minutiae of how a server or software functions is a great way to pass time. But this process doesn’t have to be an exercise in ineffective inefficiency. In fact, tools are available to you that go a very long way to make the editing of config files much, much easier. I’m going to introduce you to a few such tools, to ease some of the burden of your Linux admin duties. I’ll first discuss the command-line tools that are invaluable to the task of making configuration more efficient. Read more

Why Good Linux Sysadmins Use Markdown

The Markdown markup language is perfect for writing system administrator documentation: it is lightweight, versatile, and easy to learn, so you spend your time writing instead of fighting with formatting. The life of a Linux system administrator is complex and varied, and you know that documenting your work is a big time-saver. A documentation web server shared by you and your colleagues is a wonderful productivity tool. Most of us know simple HTML, and can whack up a web page as easily as writing plain text. But using Markdown is better. Read more