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Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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It's Time to Consider Open Source Software, Part 1

linux insider: Free software gives everyone the freedom to run, study, change and redistribute software. It is these freedoms, not the price, that is important about free software. Free software advocates make the distinction between free, as in speech, as opposed to free, as in beer. Though many people would gladly accept a free beer, it is not one of the fundamental principles of democracy.

Howto Install E17 Enlightenment Desktop in Ubuntu

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HowTos

ubuntu geek: Enlightenment, commonly referred to as e, is a open source software X window manager primarily for Unix-like computers. Enlightenment focuses on pushing the limits of existing technologies while remaining lightweight, flexible, and beautiful.

Fedora 7 Xen First Look

Filed under
Software

enterpriselinuxlog.blogs: Having spent a few days with Fedora 7, I have found that, while still a bit buggy, the updated Xen tools show some real promise. The new version of virt-manager shows the direction that the Fedora team (and consequently Red Hat) is taking with it’s GUI virtualization management tool, and it looks very promising.

Import Thunderbird Email Into Evolution

Filed under
HowTos

debianadmin: This Tutorial will explain how you can import mails from Thunderbird to Evolution. Changing email clients can be a risky task, as you usually want to keep your old email just in case you need to refer back to it.

Gimp 2.3 (preview of 2.4)

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Software

FOSSwire: In my last post, I noted that the major upgrade to Feisty as of Tribe 1 was The Gimp. Now it’s time to see what has changed in the latest installment, which will be released under the name Gimp 2.4.

Getting the most from open source

bbc: Free. It is not something Western culture does particularly well. It is certainly not something that features big in the plans of the millionaires at Microsoft, Apple and Intel - to name but a few. This week we take a look at the open source operating system Linux and make a few software recommendations.

Inside One Laptop per Child: Episode 03

Filed under
OLPC

Red Hat Mag: Since piloting this video series, we’ve received lots of questions about the XO’s mesh network. How can these laptops “talk” to each other even without widespread internet access? How is the network they create different from the network at your home or office? Episode 03 explains it all.

Pick Your Open Source Poison: Microsoft's Patent Claims Or GPLv3

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OSS

Information Week: After months of debate, the release of the next version of the General Public License, under which most open source products are issued, is imminent. The Free Software Foundation plans to issue GPL version 3 in its final form June 29. As the revised license nears completion, however, new doubts are being raised over whether it's headed in the right direction.

NVIDIA 100.14.09 Display Driver Released

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: We have previously looked at the NVIDIA 100.14.03 and 100.14.06 display drivers, but this afternoon we finally have our hands on the stable NVIDIA 100.14.09 driver. New in version 100.14.09 is added GeForce 8 and Quadro product support, improved notebook GPU support, improved RenderAccel support for sub-pixel anti-aliased fonts, added Xv brightness and contrast controls, improved interaction with newer kernels, and fixing an issue with nvidia-settings.

Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon 7.10 Tribe 1 - A Review?

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Ubuntu

shift+backspace: A couple of days ago, the first alpha (Tribe 1) of Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon 7.10 (successor to Feisty Fawn 7.04) was released. I figured I would download the Gutsy and see how it performed on my laptop.

The Linux Battle: Ubuntu vs. Fedora

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Linux

romow.com: More and more people are venturing away from Microsoft Windows and finding their way to open source operating systems. Just as more people are using them, more and more Linux distributions are available. Among the open source operating system crowd, there are 2 main contenders: Ubuntu and Fedora.

Thank You, Builders

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OSS

Linux Today: Anytime I have a fun meeting with a vendor it's a bonus; they're all nice folks, but they're not always entertaining. Some are, well, I won't say boring, but certainly dry. So whatever else Fonality has going for it, it has a fun CEO who seems excited about the company. The whole VoIP space is fascinating to me anyway, because it demonstrates the sheer power and inventiveness of open source.

Main stream Ubuntu - bug reporting users that aren’t packagers

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Ubuntu

Colin Charles: Today, I was looking for video podcasting software on Linux. PenguinTV came out tops. I got version 2.80 and I thought I’d bug report it: #119262. All in hopes of a newer version. Within the hour, my request got rejected.

IBM undeterred by setbacks to ODF adoption

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Interviews

linuxworld: You might think the steady defeat of bills in several U.S. states to mandate the use of free interoperable file formats might dampen the spirits of IBM Corp., one of the prime supporters of the OpenDocument Format (ODF). Far from it, said IBM's Bob Sutor, who sees the recent news as par for the course in the evolution of any open standard.

Scorched 3D makes tank battles fun

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Gaming

linux.com: Whether or not you remember the days when DOS was DOS and real geeks played Scorched Earth, a turn-based warfare game with tanks trading shots at each other until one was destroyed, you might find Scorched 3D, a modern remake of the old classic, just as addicting today as those playing the original did then. Not only that, it is the Project of the Month for May on SourceForge.net.

eyeOS - the open source web desktop

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OS

FOSSWire: With more and more stuff moving over to running on the web these days, and with emerging ‘web desktops’, it’s about time we strayed from our normal desktop Linux territory and took a look online. eyeOS is a project that bills itself as an open source web operating system.

Is the Linux development model flawed?

Filed under
Linux

techworld: Back in the early 1990s, when Linux initiator Linus Torwalds and open source software started to make headlines, the idea of giving software away seemed crazy. Looking at the headway the movement has made since then, you might be forgiven for wondering why Linux desktops have failed to become as ubiquitous as Linux servers are.

First look: Firefox 3 alpha 5

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica: The fifth public alpha build of Firefox 3 has been officially released. The new alpha build, which is codenamed Gran Paradiso, features early components of the revamped Places system, a cohesive storage framework that will unify bookmark and history storage.

Also: Quick Tip: Turn off Prefetching in Firefox

The Lesser Apps of KDE - Development

Filed under
KDE

Raiden's Realm: One of the lesser known features of KDE is the selection of Development applications that come bundled with it. With these tools you can create quite a few different things ranging from programs to webpages to simple scripts that can be used for a variety of purposes either professionally or personally. So let's look at each of these and what they can do for you.

ATI R200 Linux Driver Redux

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: Last week we had published The Truth About ATI/AMD & Linux, and to no real surprise, the feedback ranged from beliefs that it was propaganda to others being grateful that AMD finally shared some additional information with their Linux customers about the fglrx development cycle. While the article was far from being propaganda, what had outraged a number of open-source developers were AMD's comments on the R200 support or there the lack of. In this article, we have a few additional comments to share along with what some open-source developers had to say about AMD's information.

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today's leftovers

  • Linux Unable To Boot Lenovo Yoga 900 & 900; Is Microsoft At Fault?
    The popular device developer Lenovo has verified the claims that Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s unable to boot Linux OS but only Microsoft Windows 10. The new Lenovo convertible laptop, Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s, would reject and decline any attempt to install Linux operating system, making users turn their heads to Microsoft as the suspect for this issue. [...] This issue about the OS started when an identity of BaronHK posted on Reddit about installing Linux on the latest Lenovo Yoga book in which BaronHK encountered being blocked by a locked solid state drive (SSD) which Linux cannot define itself, and come up to link the issue to Microsoft.
  • How Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2 Performance Compares To Some Other Linux Distros
    The final Ubuntu 16.10 Beta for "Yakkety Yak" was released this week and we found its performance doesn't differ much from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (with the exception of the newer graphics stack) while here are some results comparing it to other modern Linux distributions. Tested for this quick, one-page-article comparison were Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2, Clear Linux 10660, Fedora 24, openSUSE Tumbleweed 20160927, and the Arch-based Antergos 16.9-Rolling release.
  • Qt 3D WIP branches
  • New Qt 3D Functionality Is Being Worked On
    Sean Harmer of KDAB is organizing work around some upcoming "major Qt 3D features" for the open-source toolkit. It's not known if the next round of Qt 3D features will be ready for the Qt 5.9 tool-kit release, but KDAB is looking to have these new branches for feature work with continuous integration coverage.
  • Cross-compiling WebKit2GTK+ for ARM
    Of course, I know for a fact that many people use local recipes to cross-compile WebKit2GTK+ for ARM (or simply build in the target machine, which usually takes a looong time), but those are usually ad-hoc things and hard to reproduce environments locally (or at least hard for me) and, even worse, often bound to downstream projects, so I thought it would be nice to try to have something tested with upstream WebKit2GTK+ and publish it on trac.webkit.org,
  • Should we drop Vala?
    Is it Vala development a waste of time? Is Vala suitable for long term support libraries?
  • SUSECON 2016: Where Technology Reigns Supreme [Ed: “Article Sponsor: SUSE”]
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/39
  • Free software activities in September 2016

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.6 Is Out with MIPS and OCFS2 Improvements, Updated Drivers
    Today, September 30, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the sixth maintenance update to the latest stable Linux 4.7 kernel series. Linux kernel 4.7.6 comes only five days after the release of the previous maintenance version, Linux kernel 4.7.5, and, according to the appended shortlog and the diff from the last update, it changes a total of 76 files, with 539 insertions and 455 deletions. In summary, it updates multiple drivers, adds improvements to various filesystems and hardware architectures, and improves the networking stack.
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.23 LTS Has ARM and MIPS Improvements, Updated Filesystems, More
    Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.6, Greg Kroah-Hartman proudly informed the community about the general availability of the Linux 4.4.23 LTS kernel. The Linux 4.4 kernel is a long-term supported branch, the latest and most advanced one, used in many stable and reliable GNU/Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Alpine Linux 3.4. Therefore, it is imperative for it to receive regular updates that bring fixes to the most important issues, as well as other general improvements.
  • From NFS to LizardFS
    If you’ve been following me for a while, you’ll know that we started our data servers out using NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit some load problems, switched to btrfs, hit load problems again, tried a hacky workaround, ran into problems, dropped DRBD for glusterfs, had a major disaster, switched back to NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit more load problems, and finally dropped DRBD for ZFS.
  • IBM's Ginni Rometty Tells Bankers Not To Rest On Their Digital Laurels
  • BUS1, The Successor To KDBUS, Formally Unveiled -- Aiming For Mainline Linux Kernel
    BUS1 has been in development as an in-kernel IPC mechanism building off the failed KDBUS project. An "RFC" will soon be sent out to Linux kernel developers about BUS1 and the subject will be discussed at next month's Kernel Summit. David Herrmann, one of the BUS1 developers, presented at this week's systemd.conf conference about the new capability-based IPC for Linux. He talked about how BUS1 is superior to KDBUS, how BUS1 is similar to Android's Binder, Chrome's Mojo, Solaris' Doors, and other common IPC implementations.
  • A New Wireless Daemon Is In Development To Potentially Replace wpa_supplicant
    In addition to the BUS1 presentation, also exciting from the systemd.conf 2016 conference is a thorough walkthrough of a new wireless daemon for Linux being developed by Intel's Open-Source Technology Center. Intel has been developing a new wireless daemon for Linux to potentially replace wpa_supplicant. This new daemon isn't yet public but the code repositories for it will be opened up in the next few weeks. This new daemon has improvements around persistency, WiFi management, reduced abstractions for different operating systems and legacy interfaces, and changes to operation. This daemon is designed to be very lightweight and work well for embedded Linux use-cases especially, including IoT applications.