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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 26 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Kernel 3.19.2 Stable Released With Updated Drivers And More, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Mohd Sohail 19/03/2015 - 3:24pm
Story Hardware Designs Should Be Free. Here’s How to Do It Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 1:14pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 11:35am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 11:34am
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 11:33am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 11:32am
Story Meizu MX4 Ubuntu hands-on review Rianne Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 11:02am
Story GitHub sees support of open source licenses pay off Rianne Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 10:57am
Story Ubuntu MATE 14.10 PPA Updated, Includes MATE 1.8, User Intervention Required Rianne Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 10:50am
Story Fedora 21 XFCE : Video Overview and Screenshot Tours Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 10:49am

Evaluating Ubuntu Backup Solutions — the FOSS Way

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: I don’t keep regular backups. If the hard drive in my laptop was to fail I’d have a serious problem. I would be faced with the very real risk of losing weeks, maybe even months worth of work. What I need is a backup solution.

8 Power Docks For Your Linux Machine

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: To have or not to have a dock in Linux is really dependent on individual preferences. While popular Linux distros such as Ubuntu and Fedora do not come with a dock by default, there are plenty around.

Amarok 2: a story of disappointment

Filed under
Software

rudd-o.com: Amarok 2 is regrettably worse than unusable (it actually causes data loss) for people coming from Amarok 1. Worst part is, Fedora ships it as "stable" software since its tenth release.

12 Popular Audio Players for Linux - An Overview

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: Next is an overview of the best audio players available in Linux. I will only review the GUI players, leaving tools like mp3blaster, mpg123 or ogg123 for some other time. To begin with...

First look: Fedora 11 beta shows promise

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica.com: The Fedora project has announced the availability of the Fedora 11 beta release. Fedora 11 includes several compelling new features such as support for kernel modesetting, Ext4 by default, and faster boot time.

Also: Hero Factory: The Fedora

PR Wars: Apple vs Microsoft...Does Linux need to even bother?

"I'm a Mac" ... "I'm a PC" ... "We're Linux" ... Why???

If Microsoft bought Novell, it wouldn't come as a surprise

Filed under
SUSE

itwire.com: The idea that Microsoft would buy Novell isn't exactly that far-fetched. Events on April 1 have proved this.

Slitaz Linux - Tiny but fierce

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: When someone asks you to name a small Linux distro, under 100MB, names like Puppy and Damn Small Linux come to mind. Now, the featherweight category has another candidate, a 25MB fighter called Slitaz.

Review: Moon OS 2.0

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: MoonOS is one of those elegant distros, where it focuses a lot on eyecandy and looking good. And it definitely has a lot of good things to look at. Sorta like something that comes by and catches your eye in a way that nothing else can.

GNOME 3.0 needs a big, visible change

Filed under
Software

zdnet.com.au: After first being discussed at the GUADEC conference back in July last year, the GNOME project is moving forward on its plans for GNOME 3.0, with a new user interface planned.

5 Best BSD Distributions

Filed under
BSD

junauza.com: As some of you may know, Linux is not the only Unix-like operating system available. For my own reference and for those who are also interested to try BSD, I've listed five BSD distros that are considered by many as the best:

VLC 0.9.9: The best media player just got better

Filed under
Software

news.cnet.com: If you've ever struggled to play a file you downloaded from the hinterlands of the Web, you clearly didn't try opening it with VideoLan's VLC media player, a free, hugely popular, and open-source media player.

The Hungarian Government considering open source software for educational institutions

Filed under
Linux

The Hungarian government will issue a tender within days for 12 billion forints, which is the same amount they can spend on Microsoft products, to acquire open source software. Read More Here

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • AMD Radeon HD 4890 On Linux

  • How Linux killed SGI (and is poised to kill Sun)
  • Save The ScreenSavers!
  • Ubunchu! The Ubuntu Manga is now in English
  • KDE 4.2.2 and Konqueror
  • Browser standards in an open source world
  • The UTF-8 security challenge
  • 25 Cool and Geeky BSD Wallpapers
  • Five years with Ubuntu
  • Australian State Blows Opportunity to Bring Linux to Education
  • Libre.fm - Building An Open Last.fm
  • Linux Outlaws 84 - Ext4 Brains
  • Linux chief calls for FAT-free Microsoft diet
  • Linux basics: Finding the right applications
  • Downloading and first impression of Ubuntu-Linux
  • The year of the netbook

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HOWTO remotely install debian over gentoo without physical access

  • Commandline 101: Ping and Traceroute
  • Hotplug a CPU
  • Printing in black and white on Linux
  • OOo: queries: multiplying two fields together, and summing
  • vimdiff - Edit two or Three versions of a file with Vim and show differences
  • Tiny bash scripts: check Internet connection availability
  • Use a Different Color for the Root Shell Prompt

5 Best Applications to Rip and Transcode DVDs in Linux

This is an overview of 5 most popular applications for ripping DVDs in Linux: dvd::rip, K9Copy, AcidRip, thoggen and HandBrake.

Faces behind Linux — Part #1

Filed under
Linux

linuxscrew.com: What/who you imagine when you hear the names “Ubuntu”, “Debian”, “Slackware”, etc? Is this tux, penguin, disribution logo? Have you ever wondered who is behind certain Linux distribution?

Shuttleworth: Windows 7 Is an Opportunity for Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

internetnews.com: Microsoft might be betting big on Windows 7, the next version of its flagship operating system, but to Ubuntu Linux founder Mark Shuttleworth, the upcoming release is really an opportunity for Linux to shine.

!Rant: Desktop Effects? Hell, yeah!

Filed under
Software

trolltech.com/blogs: Last year I wrote a rather strong blog when I was frustrated, titled Desktop Effects? Never more. I officially apologise for my words and retract all I said. I have been running desktop effects for months now, without a hitch.

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More in Tux Machines

Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone will run Ubuntu Touch, as well as PureOS

Purism has partnered up with UBports to offer Ubuntu Touch as a supported operating system on its Librem 5 smartphone. The crowd-sourced, open-source smartphone runs Purism’s PureOS, by default. Purism is also working with GNOME for a version of PureOS with the KDE Plasma Mobile environment, giving users a choice between three OSes. Read more

Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 2700X With Rise of The Tomb Raider On Linux

Here are our latest Linux gaming benchmarks comparing the Intel Core i7 8700K to the newly-released Ryzen 7 2700X. The focus in this article is on the Rise of the Tomb Raider Linux port released last week by Feral Interactive and powered by Vulkan. Read more

Stable kernels 4.16.5 and 4.14.37

today's leftovers

  • Heptio Debuts Gimbal Kubernetes Load Balancer Project
    Kubernetes startup Heptio has added another project to its roster of open-source efforts that provide expanded capabilities for container orchestration users.
  • Heptio Launches Kubernetes Load Balancing Application
  • The Role of Site Reliability Engineering in Microservices
    You can always spot the hot jobs in technology: they’re the ones that didn’t exist 10 years ago. While Site Reliability Engineers (SREs) did definitely exist a decade ago, they were mostly inside Google and a handful of other Valley innovators. Today, however, the SRE role exists everywhere, from Uber to Goldman Sachs, everyone is now in the business of keeping their sites online and stable. While SREs are hotshots in the industry, their role in a microservices environment is not just a natural fit that goes hand-in-hand, like peanut butter and jelly. Instead, while SREs and microservices evolved in parallel inside the world’s software companies, the former actually makes life far more difficult for the latter.
  • Lying with statistics, distributions, and popularity contests on Cooking With Linux (without a net)
    It's Tuesday and that means it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net), sponsored and supported by Linux Journal. Today, I'm courting controversy by discussing numbers, OS popularity, and how to pick the right Linux distribution if you want to be where are the beautiful people hang out. And yes, I'll do it all live, without a net, and with a high probability of falling flat on my face.
  • Voyage open sources its approach to autonomous vehicle safety
    In an effort to improve autonomous vehicle safety, Voyage is open sourcing its Open Autonomous Safety (OAS) library that contains the company’s internal safety procedures, materials, and test code that is intended to supplement the existing safety programs at autonomous vehicle startups. Voyage is the self-driving business from the educational organization Udacity.
  • Hitchhiker’s Guide to KubeCon Europe
    The cloud native community is gathering in Copenhagen next week for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe! Here’s your guide to the talks and events you won’t want to miss. Meet the Red Hat and CoreOS team members all week long, May 1-4 at booth D-E01.
  • Event - "GNU Health Con 2018" (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain)
    GNU Health is this year holding the III International GNU Health Conference, GNU Health Con 2018. This conference will gather the community of activists and developers who have been working on the project during the past 10 years.
  • ONNX: the Open Neural Network Exchange Format
    The good news is that the battleground is Free and Open. None of the big players are pushing closed-source solutions. Whether it is Keras and Tensorflow backed by Google, MXNet by Apache endorsed by Amazon, or Caffe2 or PyTorch supported by Facebook, all solutions are open-source software. Unfortunately, while these projects are open, they are not interoperable. Each framework constitutes a complete stack that until recently could not interface in any way with any other framework. A new industry-backed standard, the Open Neural Network Exchange format, could change that.
  • L.A. Lawmakers Looking To Take Legal Action Against Google For Not Solving Long-Running City Traffic Problems
    The city's government believes the traffic/mapping app has made Los Angeles' congestion worse. That the very body tasked with finding solutions to this omnipresent L.A. problem is looking to hold a private third party company responsible for its own shortcomings isn't surprising. If a third-party app can't create better traffic flow, what chance do city planners have? But beyond the buck-passing on congestion, the city may have a point about Waze making driving around Los Angeles a bit more hazardous. For several months, it's been noted that Waze has been sending drivers careening down the steepest grade in the city -- Baxter Street. Drivers seeking routes around Glendale Ave. traffic choke points have been routed to a street with a 32% grade, increasing the number of accidents located there and generally resulting in barely-controlled mayhem. When any sort of precipitation falls from the sky, the city goes insane. Drivers bypassing Glendale are now hurtling down a steep, water-covered hill, compounding the problem.
  • Even Microsoft's lost interest in Windows Phone: Skype and Yammer apps killed
    Microsoft’s given users of its collaboration apps on Windows Phone under a month’s warning of their demise. A support note from late last week advises that “Windows phone apps for Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams, and Yammer are retiring on May 20, 2018.” “Retiring” means all three will vanish from the Microsoft store on May 20, with differing results.
  • Should You Build Your Own DIY Security System?