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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Importance Of Free Open Standards In The Evolution Of The Web: Tim Berners-Lee Report

Filed under
Web

The Science And Engineering Of The Common Good - The Importance Of Free Open Standards For A Healthy Evolution Of The Web: Tim Berners-Lee reports to the United States House of Representatives.

Baby's First Laptop

Filed under
Ubuntu

My baby is turning 1. It's time to get her a laptop.

This is pretty self-evident to me, but not to the American Academy of Pediatrics, which recommends "no screen time" for children under 2 and at most 1 or 2 hours daily for kids.

How To Install VMware Server On A Fedora Core 6 Desktop

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server on a Fedora Core 6 desktop system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system.

dockers for linux

Filed under
Software

If you run KDE, you aren't just stuck with the standard "kicker" panel to operate as your app launcher and taskbar. There are a bunch of nice panel replacements that will spice up your desktop nicely. The ones that I've used and tested are kooldock, kxdocker and the nkotb kiba-dock (NB. the only place with anything useful on that site is the forum).

Display system Information Using Phpsysinfo

Filed under
HowTos

phpSysInfo is a customizable PHP script that parses various files in /proc and displays them. It will display information about system facts like Uptime, CPU, Memory, SCSI, IDE, PCI, Ethernet, Floppy, and Video. It now has full internationalization support along with customizable templates.

Phpsysinfo Requirements

Web server (apache2) with php4 or later support

Backup alternative: sbackup

Filed under
HowTos

sbackup is a backup program emerging from a Summer of Code project. It was dedicated to tightly integrate with Ubuntu but can also run on other platforms. In contrast to often used backup services like Amanda sbackup focuses on the user of the machine.

A quick install of the Opera browser on Feisty, the next version of Ubuntu.

Filed under
HowTos

A test install of Opera 9.10 to see if all is well on the Opera/Ubuntu Feisty compatibility front. In this story flashplugin-nonfree, sun-java6-plugin and sun-java6-jre are installed, all available in the repositories of Ubuntu Feisty (universe multiverse).

sudo apt-get install flashplugin-nonfree, sun-java6-plugin sun-java6-jre

Review: dyne:bolic 2.4.2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

This distribution is about more than creating another version of Linux. It has a strong political and philosophical impetus behind it. I will let their website explain it:

dyne:bolic is RASTA software released free under the GNU General Public License.

Ubuntu 5.10 reaches end-of-life

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu announced the release of 5.10 almost 18 months ago, on October 13th. As with the earlier releases, Ubuntu committed to ongoing security and critical fixes for a period of 18 months. The support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 5.10 will reach end of life on Friday April 13th 2007.

The Feeds and Speeds of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

Filed under
Linux

While Red Hat, like many other operating system and more complete software stack providers, wants to pitch the latest release of its software as a major change in packaging that will broaden the appeal of its products, the fact remains that for many customers, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 is a new and substantially improved operating system that will be sold on its own merits of features, performanc

Beryl 0.2.0 Released

Filed under
Software

Beryl 0.2.0 is a complete overhaul of Beryl. The last stable release 0.1, featured a very fun, and eye-candy based compositing window manager. However, since it’s release, many parts of beryl have been rewritten, replaced, or simply dropped. The Beryl team has put in numerous hours to bring you this release.

Fun with Ubuntu -- Top Ten Next Names, Part 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

Last week I gave you half of my Top Ten Names for Ubuntu releases. As a reminder, they were: 'pissy porcupine', 'bitty bat', 'virtual viper', 'talky tortoise', and (my favorite) 'kinky kangaroo'. Now here are the rest.

Giving Back

Filed under
OSS

In my last article I cited the Vector Linux developers as an excellent example of the way Open Source developers respond to the user community. All of us who benefit from Linux and/or the myriad of Open Source applications out there are part of that community.

Peeking in the Windows of ReactOS 0.3.1

Filed under
OS
Reviews
-s

With the internetnews.com article published today, I found myself a bit curious as to what ReactOS exactly was and what it looked like.

CrossOver Linux 6.01 review

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Though each CrossOver Linux (formerly known as CrossOver Office) release offers substantial improvements, version 6.01 is the most revolutionary release I have seen since I started reviewing this product circa version 3.0.

Matt Asay: Who cares about the Novell/Microsoft patent deal?

Filed under
SUSE

Not their customers, apparently. Matthew Aslett got to talk with a joint Novell/Microsoft guinea pig (I mean, customer Smile, HSBC, and the support for the IP indemnity is underwhelming, at best: "Its a nice to have. I dont think it was a main feature for me, but its nice to have."

GNOME 2.18 (Simply Beautiful)

Filed under
Software

GNOME 2.18 is out, on time as usual. The top-class free desktop for the masses looks and feels better than ever. This is another progressive release in our road to perfection. It integrates another load of improvements done in the visual design, the performance of the desktop components, and the growing collection of integrated applications.

VirtualBox update

Filed under
Software

Innotek released a new version of its virtual machine VirtualBox. The minor update features important bug fixes and useful adjustments which are especially useful on Linux.

When I tested VirtualBox for the first time I was pretty excited. Since then Innotek has released two minor versions featuring several important bugfixes, small features and adjustments.

Use open source Subversion for personal document management

Filed under
HowTos

There is an open source version control system, or revision control system, known as Subversion (svn for short) that has rapidly become a favorite of developers. It enjoys an excellent reputation and a wealth of free, online documentation, as well as a growing body of published texts on the subject of its efficient and practical use.

Bringing Web-based applications offline

Filed under
Software

The Web 2.0 mantra suggests that you forget desktop applications and embrace AJAXified browser-based apps that you can run from any OS, anywhere, as long as you have a speedy connection to the Internet. But what about times when you can't get online? Firefox, Opera, and others are looking to make it possible run applications offline, anytime, anywhere.

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More in Tux Machines

A Grand Experiment

The latest debacle over the "forced" upgrade to Windows 10 and Apple's increasingly locked-in ecosystem has got me thinking. Do I really need to use a proprietary operating system to get work done? And while I'm at it, do I need to use commercial cloud services to store my data? I've always used Linux since the first time I tried installing Slackware in the mid-90s. In 1998 we were the first national TV show to install Linux live (Red Hat). And I've often advocated Ubuntu to people with older computers. I usually have at least one computer running Linux around, in the past couple of years Dell XPS laptops have been great choices. And a couple of months ago I bought a 17" Oryx laptop from System76, an Ubuntu system integrator, for use in studio. But as time went by, even Ubuntu began to seem too commercial to me, and I've migrated to community supported Debian testing and the Arch-based Antergos distros for everything. (i use Antergos on my Oryx on the shows.) Read more Also: Microsoft lays off remaining handful of Microsoft Press staff

Karbonn confirms Android One smartphone(s) launching in Q1 next year

In an interview with TOI Tech, Karbonn Mobiles has confirmed it will be introducing new Android One-based smartphone(s) early next year. Karbonn's Managing Director Pradeep Jain said the company is in talks with Google for Android One, and we might see some Android One smartphone launch(es) in Q1 of next year. Read more

COM and Pico-ITX dev kit run Linux on dual-core Cortex-A7

iWave has launched a rugged, SODIMM-style COM and Pico-ITX form factor carrier board that run Linux on the Renesas dual-core, Cortex-A7 RZ/G1E SoC. In January, iWave launched the iW-RainboW-G20M-Qseven computer-on-module, built around the dual-core 1.5GHz Cortex-A15 based Renesas RZ/G1M and RZ/G1N SoCs. Now the company has followed up with a 67.6 x 37mm, SODIMM form factor “iW-RainboW-G22M-SM” COM that runs Linux 3.10.31 on the dual-core Cortex-A7 based RZ/G1E SoC from the same RZ/G series SoCs. Read more