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Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

KDE's Kate text editor gets Vi input mode

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The KDE desktop environment's advanced text editing program, which is called Kate, has a new input mode that is designed to mimic the functionality of the text-based Vi editor.

Fired Up Over A Hot Browser

Filed under
Moz/FF

investors.com: Even though Mitchell Baker was fired from her role overseeing a struggling software project in 2001, she wasn't about to quit.

Why I moved to Gnome

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.andrewmin: I’ve been a KDE user basically since I started using Linux. The Qt toolkit’s default theme was much more visually appealing than GTK+, KDE’s purple and silver was a nicer mix than Ubuntu’s orange and brown, and the KDE apps were pretty awesome. Despite this, I’m now sitting here in front of a clean Ubuntu Intrepid install.

Funtoo is so easy it should be illegal

Filed under
Gentoo

azerthoth.blogspot: I sit here watching the first emerge --sync go slowly scrolling by in preparation for my second go around with Funtoo. The Funtoo creator Daniel Robbins, the same man who gave us Gentoo, has started a new project for us geeks to play with.

$500 KWin bounty

Filed under
KDE

undefinedfire.com: For those who have not read the KWin mailing list recently an extremely nice KDE user has placed a cash bounty on the implementation of a particular KWin feature.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Talking with Likewise on GPLv3 and community management

  • Seagate offers fix for problematic Barracuda drives on Mac/Linux systems
  • Xavier School Deploys 600 Ubuntu Linux Desktops
  • Thanking open source developers
  • Consumer Search running Drupal
  • Run your NFS server in the user address space with NFS-GANESHA
  • sexism in Debian
  • Steve Ballmer Loves Linux
  • VLC. The swiss army knife of video viewing.
  • Analyst: Red Hat "deeply undervalued," Oracle Linux "has failed"
  • Cisco Offers $100,000 Bounty to Linux Application Developers
  • Open Sources Episode 3: Why does technology hate us?
  • Daniel Robbins: What I’ve Been Up To – New site, etc.
  • Jono Bacon: The Flow Of Ideas
  • Third ever webserver retired...
  • CrunchBang Linux 8.10.01 released
  • Aaron Seigo: free software supply chains
  • 64bit Linux, PulseAudio, Fedora 10 and so on

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install Tint Task Manager in Debian

  • SHIFT, CAPSLOCK, and CONTROL keys stop working in Ubuntu
  • Understanding the Linux Filesystem
  • Use the date Command to Measure Elapsed Time
  • Revisor: Creating Custom Fedora Installation Media
  • Looking for large files on your Linux
  • How to reset a lost MySQL root password
  • Data encryption and Ubuntu, Part II
  • How to downgrade the Kernel in Ubuntu 8.10 the easy way
  • Create Encrypted CD’s and DVD’s in Linux
  • Freeing up disk space in Ubuntu
  • Good Power Management Practices

Blockbuster box runs Linux

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Blockbuster announced a branded version of a IP set-top box and media player from 2Wire that runs Linux on a MIPS-based Broadcom chipset. The Blockbuster version of the 2Wire MediaPoint digital media player is used to download videos from Blockbuster OnDemand via broadband.

Linux Moves From Grazing to Gorging at the Unix Buffet

Filed under
Linux

serverwatch.com: UNIX is being attacked by Linux from the top and bottom ends of the market. The signs are that it is losing the battle on both fronts.

Why engage in open source FUD?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: Whether or not Gartner Group really is engaging in FUD regarding open source, there is a good reason for it. There is big money in FUD.

some interviews

Filed under
Interviews
  • Interview With Adam Williamson - Mandriva Community Manager

  • Interview with Bryce Harrington: Ubuntu Xorg Maintainer
  • Ubuntu Community Interview: Nicolas Valcárcel

Mozilla posts first Firefox 3.1 release candidate build

Filed under
Moz/FF

tgdaily.com: Mozilla is close to be releasing a major update for its Firefox 3 browser. The release candidate of Firefox 3.1 appeared earlier today and is, as far as we can see, pretty much finished. The actual release of the browser should only be a matter of days.

Gmail notifiers let you know "you've got mail"

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you are into email like Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan were in the movie You've Got Mail, you probably want to be warned as soon as any message enters your mailbox. If you use Gmail, you can try one of several Gmail-specific applications that let you know when new messages arrive.

GNOME's Empathy IM client gets file transfer support

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Empathy is an open source instant messaging client for the GNOME desktop environment. It made its big debut in GNOME 2.24, which was released in September.

Updated Prey Demo For Linux Released

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: More than a month ago, Ryan Gordon had released a Prey Linux demo. At that time he said the full Linux client for Prey would be out in a few days, but it still has yet to be released. However, in time for Thanksgiving, Ryan has now put out an updated Prey demo for Linux.

KDE 4.2 Beta 1 Released

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Community today announced the immediate availability of "Caterpillar", (a.k.a KDE 4.2 Beta 1), the first testing release of the new KDE 4.2 desktop. For the 4.2 release, the KDE team has fixed literally thousands of bugs and has implemented dozens of features that were missing until now in KDE 4. 2 fixes your issues.

PC/OS 2009 OpenWorkstation Review

Filed under
Reviews

There are a few distros out there that are for the novice user. PC/OS 2009 is an Ubuntu based distribution using XFCE 4.4.2 as its desktop.
gnuman.com

Linux Virus: A False Sense Of Security

Filed under
Linux
Security

linuxhaxor.net: There seems to be a false sense of security among some Linux users. The number of malicious programs specifically written for GNU/Linux has been on the increase in recent years and in the year of 2005 alone has more than doubled: from 422 to 863.

Installation hell : StarOffice 9

Filed under
Software

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: You might think that a company sending out review copies of their latest product would try to get everything right. Simple things like making it easy to install for instance, so that reviewers could get straight to what they should be looking at with the minimum of fuss. You might think that, but you'd be wrong.

German traffic lights powered by Linux and real-time Java

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

nerdden.com: A major European vendor of city-wide traffic management systems is porting its flagship traffic light controller to Linux and real-time Java. Signalbau Huber says its Actros controller will better meet safety-critical requirements.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Two Point Hospital, PLAY WITH ME and More

OSS: HIT, SUSE, FSFE, Meaning of Open, Bell Canada

  • How Open Source, Crowdsourcing Aids HIT Development
    HIT development is important for health IT infrastructure growth as organizations continue to go through their digital transformations. Entities are interested in the most innovative and advanced technology to assist with increased workflows and improve patient care. Open source and crowdsourcing to improve innovation are key to quickly building on technology being developed for healthcare. This is especially true when it comes to newer technology like artificial intelligence (AI) and blockchain. Healthcare organizations and healthcare technology companies cannot simply wait around for advanced technology to develop around them.
  • Open source in the enterprise: Trends and opportunities in 2018
    Some big events are set to come in 2018 – the recently announced Royal Wedding, the football World Cup in Russia and the incoming general data protection regulation (GDPR) to name just a few. And 2018 is also set to be a significant year for business technology. Some of the key trends in enterprise IT will include the continued move to hybrid cloud, the emergence of the container infrastructure ecosystem and ongoing growth in software-defined infrastructure and storage. Most interestingly, we foresee a number of significant open source developments here. So what exactly should we expect to see? And how can IT teams make the most of these emerging opportunities?
  • Keeping an Irish home warm and free in winter
    This issue would also appear to fall under the scope of FSFE's Public Money Public Code campaign. Looking at the last set of heating controls in the house, they have been there for decades. Therefore, I can't help wondering, if I buy some proprietary black box today, will the company behind it still be around when it needs a software upgrade in future? How many of these black boxes have wireless transceivers inside them that will be compromised by security flaws within the next 5-10 years, making another replacement essential? With free and open technologies, anybody who is using it can potentially make improvements whenever they want. Every time a better algorithm is developed, if all the homes in the country start using it immediately, we will always be at the cutting edge of energy efficiency.
  • The Meaning of Open
    Open systems create gravity wells. Systems that are truly open tend to attract others to join them at an ever-accelerating pace. In ecosystems that are ruled by a despot no matter how successful other participants in the ecosystem are, they fundamentally just empower the despot to have more leverage over them, because they have more to lose and their success feeds the despot’s success. In open systems, on the contrary, participants see that they don’t have to fear their own success fueling their own increasing subservience to a despot. Each individual entity who can’t plausibly build their own similarly-sized proprietary ecosystem to compete — the overwhelming majority of entities — is incentivized to pitch in on the open ecosystem. Investment in an open ecosystem by any one entity helps the entire ecosystem as a whole. This fact, combined with the fact that ecosystems generally get exponentially more valuable the more participants there are, means that in many cases over sufficient time scales truly open ecosystems create gravity wells, sucking more and more into them until they are nearly universal.
  • Bell Canada brings open source automation ONAP into production
    Bell Canada has implemented it's first automation use case using the Linux Foundation's Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) as part of the telco's Network 3.0 transformation initiative. With an initial focus on its data center network infrastructure, Bell Canada is working with its network integration and back-office partner Amdocs to reduce costs and delivery capabilities.
  • Bell Canada Reaches Milestone in Network 3.0 Vision with Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) and Strategic Partnership with Amdocs

Linux Kernel 4.15 Delayed

  • Linux Kernel 4.15 Delayed Until Next Week as Linus Torvalds Announces a Rare RC9
    While the Linux community was looking forwards to the final Linux 4.15 kernel release today, Linus Torvalds just delayed it for another week, announcing the ninth Release Candidate (RC) instead. It's not every day that you see a ninth Release Candidate in the development cycle of a new Linux kernel branch, but here we go, and we can only blame it on those pesky Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that affect us all, putting billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Linux 4.15 becomes slowest release since 2011
    Linus Torvalds has decided that Linux 4.15 needs a ninth release candidate, making it the first kernel release to need that much work since 2011. Torvalds flagged the possibility of an extra release candidate last week, with the caveat that “it obviously requires this upcoming week to not come with any huge surprises” after “all the Meltdown and Spectre hoopla” made his job rather more complicated in recent weeks. Fast-forward another week and Torvalds has announced “I really really wanted to just release 4.15 today, but things haven't calmed down enough for me to feel comfy about it”.
  • No 4.15 final release today
    As might have been expected from watching the commit stream, the 4.15 kernel is not ready for release, so we'll get 4.15-rc9 instead. Linus said: "I really really wanted to just release 4.15 today, but things haven't calmed down enough for me to feel comfy about it, and Davem tells me he still has some networking fixes pending. Laura Abbott found and fixed a very subtle boot bug introduced this development cycle only yesterday, and it just didn't feel right to say that we're done."

Linus Torvalds Calls Linux Patch for Intel CPUs "Complete and Utter Garbage"

The patch submitted by David Woodhouse, ex-Intel kernel engineer that now works for Amazon described a so-called new feature for Intel processors to address Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation (IBRS) by creating macros that would restrict or unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation based on if the Intel CPU will advertise "I am able to be not broken." The "x86/enter: Create macros to restrict/unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation" feature implies that the IBRS (Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation) bit needed to be set at boot time to "ask" the processor not to be broken. Linus Torvalds immediately reacted to the patch calling it "complete and utter garbage" despite the developer's efforts to explain why he implemented the nasty hack. Read more Original: [RFC 09/10] x86/enter: Create macros to restrict/unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation