Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 08 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story FFmpeg Reaches Version 1.0 srlinuxx 29/09/2012 - 6:16pm
Story 7 Things About Gnome 3.6 That You Will Love srlinuxx 29/09/2012 - 6:14pm
Story openSUSE-Education Li-f-e 12.2 edition too cool srlinuxx 29/09/2012 - 6:08pm
Story openSUSE 12.2 Mantis review - Average srlinuxx 29/09/2012 - 6:02pm
Story Slackware 14.0 is Finally Here srlinuxx 29/09/2012 - 6:00pm
Blog entry Creating an AD Server for Free using Ubuntu and Samba fieldyweb 29/09/2012 - 12:23pm
Story First Look: GNOME 3.6 srlinuxx 29/09/2012 - 2:17am
Story Firefox: decade of real choice - there's no app for that srlinuxx 28/09/2012 - 6:53pm
Story A Linux user switches to DOS srlinuxx 28/09/2012 - 6:51pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 28/09/2012 - 6:09pm

A Quick introduction To FVWM - Virtual Desktop Windows Manager for Linux

Filed under
Software

credence: FVWM image pictureFVWM is one of the big mysteries of the open source world. It is an extremely versatile window manager, configurable up to every possible aspect. However, many beginners are somewhat scared because they do not know exactly how to go about learning to use FVWM. This is what we will talk about here.

PackageKit progress

Filed under
Software
MDV

Fabrice Facorat: Previously I talked about PackageKit, a DBUS system to handle packages, especially for the updates mecanism. So what's new on PackageKit front ?

Also: Expérimental X11 intel driver

Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "The elections for five of the ten members of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board[TAB] are held every year, currently the election will be at the 2007 Kernel Summit in a BOF session," James Bottomley, the TAB chair, announced on the Linux Kernel mailing list.

Can developers reclaim donated IP?

Filed under
Interviews

linux.com: In 2004 Daniel Robbins, the founder of Gentoo Linux, walked away from the project after creating the nonprofit Gentoo Foundation to handle its intellectual property (IP). In a blog post last month, Robbins wondered if he should take back the software, since it didn't appear the foundation was taking care of things. While Robbins didn't follow through on his thought, he raised an interesting question: Can someone convey intellectual property rights and then reclaim them?

Beware of Skype

Filed under
Misc

freesoftware mag: On Sunday, August 5, 2007 Bush signed the revised Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) into law, in which the U.S. Congress spinelessly caved in and gave legal authority to the Bush administration to continue to intercept and spy on electronic communications. Then, on Thursday, August 16, 2007 the whole worldwide Skype network goes down. Coincidence?

What Happened in Germany

Filed under
OSS

Groklaw: Heise is reporting now that there is an uproar over how the OOXML vote was handled in Germany. That happened in Switzerland too, where two formal objections have been filed. Portugal was a bit of a mess too, from reports we've heard. Now the same kinds of complaints are being heard from Germany.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Configure wireless support in Mandriva Linux with ndiswrapper

  • Making Steinberg Nuendo work on Linux
  • Searching database content with Sphinx
  • Using kvm, or kqemu, to speed up qemu
  • Giving yourself a quieter SSH login
  • Understanding the Linux file system directories / hierarchy
  • Howto display the number of processors in Linux

Using Linux Media Centre

Filed under
Software

ITWeek: Vista is pricey, and its form and function are of course dictated by Microsoft. If you want full control over your Home Theater PC (HTPC), and don’t want to have to pay Microsoft for it, then Linux is a more than capable alternative base for building a system of your own.

MEPIS 7.0 Beta2: More Updates and Fixes

Filed under
Linux

Warren Woodford of MEPIS has announced Beta2 of SimplyMEPIS 7.0. The kernel in Beta2 is version 2.6.22.4 which is a security update from the Kernel Development Team. All of the MEPIS Assistants and the Installer were updated to fix minor problems reported by testers. Amarok was updated to version 1.4.7. There were minor updates to some KDE 3.5.7 packages.

Did Microsoft Buy Netcraft?

Filed under
Web

Linux Journal: Okay, I'm not seriously suggesting Microsoft is paying off Netcraft to produce positive survey results (although this is certainly a standard operating procedure for Microsoft). But something is odd, if not rotten, in the state of Netcraft.

UDS: Here it comes

Filed under
Ubuntu

Jono Bacon: Guess what folks, its coming to that time again…you got it - Ubuntu Developer Summit time!!

Review: Sabayon Linux 3.4a

Filed under
Linux

raiden's realm: Sabayon Linux is a distribution that seeks to take the Linux desktop and put an artistic spin to it that other distributions don’t have. Their motto of “when art meets inspiration” speaks highly to this desire. But what makes Sabayon stand out from all the rest?

Begrudging admission: Puppy Linux rocks

Filed under
Linux

Motho ke motho ka botho: I never tried it because I couldn’t get past the chihuahua mascot, but I spun it up this afternoon, and Puppy Linux gets a huge gold star from me.

Which is the best file system for solid state disks?

Filed under
Linux

lkmltimes: Richard Ballantyne asked on LKML: “What file system that is already in the linux kernel do people recommend I use for my laptop that now contains a solid state disk?”

Open source is apolitical

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: This week a number of thinkers tried to pigeonhole open source inside political philosophy. Thankfully they all failed. Why do so many people try to play “capture the flag” with it?

Production of low-cost laptop to start in September

Filed under
OLPC

engineering news: The One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project will start mass production of its first laptop model, the OLPC XO, in September, says chief technology officer Mary Lou Jepson.

Why Sabayon isn’t Gentoo

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

theopensourceactivist: Sabayon is considered ‘close’ to Gentoo, but not necessarily ‘very close’ (atleast in my view). The reason for this is because Sabayon uses its own versions of some pretty major packages.

Building Your own Custom Linux PC

Filed under
Hardware

thecredence.com: Hardware compatibility was a major issue with Linux some years ago, but it's quite safe to say that we have gone past that point. Almost all major hardware components have Linux drivers available, and they can be used without much hassle. So lets build a Perfect Custom Linux PC.

LightScribe disc labeler for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: LightScribe technology, which allows users to etch labels directly onto CDs and DVDs, finally arrived on GNU/Linux in late 2006. LaCie LightScribe Labeler for Linux (4L) was released in October 2006, with Hewlett-Packard's LightScribe business unit releasing its own Simple Labeler a month later.

I'm sweet sixteen and ready to party in Turkey

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox blogs: Not me personally Smile I am more than twice that age. My sixteen year old is the Linux Kernel that Linus Torvalds presented on the 25th of August 1991. To celebrate this auspicious event the Chamber of Electrical Engineer's and the Turkish Linux Users Club is having a party right here in Ankara!

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Devices/Mobile

  • AsteroidOS is an Open Source OS for Smartwatches
    Florent Revest is a French computer science student who has been working on an open source operating system for smartwatches for the last two years. Yesterday, he officially launched version 1 of the alpha for AsteroidOS. The goal for the platform was to create something that gave smartwatch owners more control over their privacy, as well as the hardware they purchased. Florent feels that the current proprietary platforms do not guarantee this, and this was the basis for AsteroidOS. He wanted his open source smartwatch operating system to provide freedom with free software, more privacy than other wearable platforms offer, interoperability so it could communicate with other devices, modularity that enabled the user to tweak and change the OS as they see fit, the ability to port the software to as many devices as possible, and gathering a community who is passionate about the platform.
  • AsteroidOS Brings Open Source Functionality To Smartwatches
    Smartwatches may not have taken off like companies were hoping, but they have come quite far in terms of what they can offer and what sorts of features are available for the many different models of smartwatches that are out there. Even with the updated functionality of options like Samsung’s Gear S lineup and Android Wear platforms, though, smartwatches can still feel a little bit limiting, and part of this undoubtedly includes the reason that the operating systems aren’t as open as platforms like Android. That is now changing thanks to a platform called AsteroidOS which is an open source operating system for smartwatches.
  • Mini Apollo Lake module takes the heat — and the cold
    Congatec’s “Conga-MA5” is a Linux-ready COM Express Compact Type 10 Mini module with Apollo Lake SoCs, up to 128GB eMMC 5.1, and -40 to 85°C support. Congatec was one of the first embedded vendors to announce computer-on-modules based on Intel’s Atom E3900 and other Apollo Lake Pentium and Celeron SoCs. The offerings included a Qseven module, a SMARC 2.0 module, and a COM Express Compact Type 6 Conga-TCA5. The company has now followed up with a COM Express Compact Type 10 Mini Conga-MA5 module.
  • Top 20 Best Tizen Apps for November 2016, Tizen Smartphone
  • Smartphone game: Indian Football League game comes to the Tizen Store

Security News

Red Hat and Fedora

Technical
  • Red Hat Takes OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat has steadily taken significant steps in the cloud computing arena, expanding the focus of its OpenShift open source Platform-as-a-Service hybrid cloud computing offering, including launching a cloud-hosted commercial edition called OpenShift Online. Now, the company has announced the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, according to Red Hat. Users also get access to Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Red Hat Launches OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s award-winning container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, benefiting from Red Hat’s deep enterprise experience. Users also benefit from Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Image Gallery: Synnex Cloud Catalyst Conference Featuring Red Hat, XMedius, Plantronics
Financial Fedora/Community
  • Fedora 23 End of Life
    With the recent release of Fedora 25, Fedora 23 will officially enter End Of Life (EOL) status on December 20th, 2016. After December 20th, all packages in the Fedora 23 repositories will no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates, and no new packages will be added to the Fedora 23 collection. Upgrading to Fedora 24 or Fedora 25 before December 20th 2016 is highly recommended for all users still running Fedora 23.
  • What Is Wayland and What Does It Means for Linux Users
    Fedora 25 is now out. People are buzzing, as the team have decided to make Wayland the default graphical session going forward. For many Linux users Wayland is a new term that has popped up, but one that they do not understand. In this article we’ll briefly go over what Wayland is, what it does, and why developers are flocking to it in droves! What exactly is Wayland? Let’s find out!
  • Korora 25 is Ready
    The Korora Project has released version 25 (codename "Gurgle") which is now available for download. As usual, you can find a list of already known problems at the common F25 bugs page.
  • Fedora Design Interns Update
  • Holiday Break 2016.
    It’s sad I don’t get more time to post here these days. Being a manager is a pretty busy job, although I have no complaints! It’s enjoyable, and fortunately I have one of the best teams imaginable to work with, the Fedora Engineering team.

openSUSE Says Goodbye to AMD/ATI Catalyst (fglrx) Proprietary Graphics Drivers

openSUSE developer Bruno Friedmann, informed the community of the openSUSE Linux operating system about the fact that he's planning to remove the old ATI/AMD Catalyst (also known as fglrx) proprietary graphics drivers. Read more