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About Tux Machines

Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install Tint Task Manager in Debian

  • SHIFT, CAPSLOCK, and CONTROL keys stop working in Ubuntu
  • Understanding the Linux Filesystem
  • Use the date Command to Measure Elapsed Time
  • Revisor: Creating Custom Fedora Installation Media
  • Looking for large files on your Linux
  • How to reset a lost MySQL root password
  • Data encryption and Ubuntu, Part II
  • How to downgrade the Kernel in Ubuntu 8.10 the easy way
  • Create Encrypted CD’s and DVD’s in Linux
  • Freeing up disk space in Ubuntu
  • Good Power Management Practices

Blockbuster box runs Linux

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Blockbuster announced a branded version of a IP set-top box and media player from 2Wire that runs Linux on a MIPS-based Broadcom chipset. The Blockbuster version of the 2Wire MediaPoint digital media player is used to download videos from Blockbuster OnDemand via broadband.

Linux Moves From Grazing to Gorging at the Unix Buffet

Filed under
Linux

serverwatch.com: UNIX is being attacked by Linux from the top and bottom ends of the market. The signs are that it is losing the battle on both fronts.

Why engage in open source FUD?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: Whether or not Gartner Group really is engaging in FUD regarding open source, there is a good reason for it. There is big money in FUD.

some interviews

Filed under
Interviews
  • Interview With Adam Williamson - Mandriva Community Manager

  • Interview with Bryce Harrington: Ubuntu Xorg Maintainer
  • Ubuntu Community Interview: Nicolas Valcárcel

Mozilla posts first Firefox 3.1 release candidate build

Filed under
Moz/FF

tgdaily.com: Mozilla is close to be releasing a major update for its Firefox 3 browser. The release candidate of Firefox 3.1 appeared earlier today and is, as far as we can see, pretty much finished. The actual release of the browser should only be a matter of days.

Gmail notifiers let you know "you've got mail"

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you are into email like Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan were in the movie You've Got Mail, you probably want to be warned as soon as any message enters your mailbox. If you use Gmail, you can try one of several Gmail-specific applications that let you know when new messages arrive.

GNOME's Empathy IM client gets file transfer support

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Empathy is an open source instant messaging client for the GNOME desktop environment. It made its big debut in GNOME 2.24, which was released in September.

Updated Prey Demo For Linux Released

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: More than a month ago, Ryan Gordon had released a Prey Linux demo. At that time he said the full Linux client for Prey would be out in a few days, but it still has yet to be released. However, in time for Thanksgiving, Ryan has now put out an updated Prey demo for Linux.

KDE 4.2 Beta 1 Released

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Community today announced the immediate availability of "Caterpillar", (a.k.a KDE 4.2 Beta 1), the first testing release of the new KDE 4.2 desktop. For the 4.2 release, the KDE team has fixed literally thousands of bugs and has implemented dozens of features that were missing until now in KDE 4. 2 fixes your issues.

PC/OS 2009 OpenWorkstation Review

Filed under
Reviews

There are a few distros out there that are for the novice user. PC/OS 2009 is an Ubuntu based distribution using XFCE 4.4.2 as its desktop.
gnuman.com

Linux Virus: A False Sense Of Security

Filed under
Linux
Security

linuxhaxor.net: There seems to be a false sense of security among some Linux users. The number of malicious programs specifically written for GNU/Linux has been on the increase in recent years and in the year of 2005 alone has more than doubled: from 422 to 863.

Installation hell : StarOffice 9

Filed under
Software

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: You might think that a company sending out review copies of their latest product would try to get everything right. Simple things like making it easy to install for instance, so that reviewers could get straight to what they should be looking at with the minimum of fuss. You might think that, but you'd be wrong.

German traffic lights powered by Linux and real-time Java

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

nerdden.com: A major European vendor of city-wide traffic management systems is porting its flagship traffic light controller to Linux and real-time Java. Signalbau Huber says its Actros controller will better meet safety-critical requirements.

Review: PC-BSD 7.0.1

Filed under
BSD

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: Today’s distro has been described as the Ubuntu of the BSD world. PC-BSD is an easy to use version of FreeBSD. FreeBSD is the behemoth in the BSD world and would probably have a much larger desktop presence if the BSDs hadn’t run into copyright and other proprietary problems right around when most of the GNU toolset was complete.

openSUSE Sports a New License (Ding dong, the EULA’s dead…)

Filed under
SUSE

zonker.opensuse: Just in time for openSUSE 11.1 RC 1, we’ve finished the new and improved license for openSUSE 11.1. The days of agreeing to a EULA for openSUSE are over!

Fedora 10 proves infrastructure matter

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Glancing at the features list for Fedora 10, at first you might be unimpressed. Many of the features are basically infrastructure improvements, fixing known problems and enhancing performance while laying the groundwork for future developments. However, infrastructure affects almost everything you do.

The complete Christmas shopper's guide to Linux-based netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

itwire.com: Give a gift of a netbook this year; I will be. These ultra-light computing devices are versatile, affordable and appealing. But which one to buy?

A future so bright Tux needs shades

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet: Killer Penguin beer labelTo hear Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin tell it, the operating system war is over and Linux has won.

ReactOS; a free alternative to Windows

Filed under
OS

aronzak.wordpress: For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction is where ReactOS, what is essentially an attempt at a free Windows clone, derives its name. The project aims to be ‘binary compatible’ with Windows.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • 20 Years of LWN
    Back in mid-1997, your editor (Jonathan Corbet) and Liz Coolbaugh were engaged in a long-running discussion on how to trade our nice, stable, reliably paying jobs for a life of uncertainty, poverty, and around-the-clock work. Not that we thought of it in those terms, naturally. We eventually settled on joining Red Hat's nascent "support partner" program; while we were waiting for it to get started, we decided to start a weekly newsletter as a side project — not big and professional like the real press — to establish ourselves in the community. Thus began an amazing journey that has just completed its 20th year. After some time thinking about what we wanted to do and arguing about formats, we published our first edition on January 22, 1998. It covered a number of topics, including the devfs controversy, the pesky 2GB file-size limit on the ext2 filesystem, the use of Linux on Alpha to render scenes in the film "Titanic", the fact that Red Hat had finally hired a full-time quality-assurance person and launched the Red Hat Advanced Development Labs, and more. We got almost no feedback on this issue, though, perhaps because we didn't tell anybody that we had created it.
  •  
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.4 | Ubuntu 17.10 Revisited
    Canonical revised Ubuntu 17.10 with the new 17.10.1. Time to take another look…
  • PodCTL #22 – Highway to Helm
    One of the reasons that Kubernetes has gained so much traction in the marketplace is because it is flexible enough to allow innovation to happen all around the core APIs. One area where that has happened is in application package management, specifically with the Helm project.
  • LibreELEC Linux OS Will Get Meltdown and Spectre Patches with Next Major Release
    The development team behind the Kodi-based LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source HTPC operating system for embedded systems and PCs released LibreELEC 8.2.3. LibreELEC 8.2.3 is the third maintenance update to the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series of the Just enough Operating System (JeOS), which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center. It's here a month after the LibreELEC 8.2.2 point release to address a few issues.
  • openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week
    The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26. The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3. “We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”
  • French Gender-Neutral Translation for Roundcube
    Here's a quick blog post to tell the world I'm now doing a French gender-neutral translation for Roundcube.
  •  
  • This Oil Major Has a Supercomputer the Size of a Soccer Field
    Big Oil is now Big Tech. So big, in fact, that Eni SpA’s new supercomputer is the size of a soccer field. In the multimillion-dollar pursuit of the world’s most powerful computers, the Italian explorer says it’s taken the lead. Its new machine, located outside Milan, will scan for oil and gas reservoirs deep below the Earth over thousands of miles. “This is where the company’s heart is, where we hold our most delicate data and proprietary technology,” Eni Chief Executive Officer Claudio Descalzi said in an interview on Thursday.

Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, K

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.