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Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 2:31am
Story LG tips new 4K TVs running WebOS 2.0 Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 2:26am
Story Today in Techrights Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 1:40am
Story OnePlus unveils its own Android build without Cyanogen Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 1:31am
Story Things I appreciate about Android Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 1:23am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 02/01/2015 - 9:41pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 02/01/2015 - 9:39pm
Story Improving math performance in glibc Roy Schestowitz 02/01/2015 - 9:06pm
Story Happy New Year & Browser and OS stats for 2014 Roy Schestowitz 02/01/2015 - 9:01pm
Story Deciso Launches OPNsense, a New Open Source Firewall Initiative Roy Schestowitz 02/01/2015 - 7:16pm

First Impressions: Sabayon Linux Four Oh!

Filed under
Linux

ruminations: Two years ago I ran into Sabayon Linux for the first time. Version 3.2 was about to be released and I gave Sabayon a spin on my laptop. I wasn’t very lucky with later releases which simply refused to be installed. Two weeks ago Sabayon Linux Four Oh! was released. How far did Sabayon progress over the last two years?

Penguin Awareness Day - January 20th, 2009

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Linux

Jon maddog Hall: While "Penguin Awareness Day" officially has little to do with Linux, there is really no reason why we could not use this day to make people aware of our favorite operating system and Free Software in general.

Sidux Linux with LXDE - First Impressions

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Linux

saigonnezumi.com: I have been wanting to try out Sidux Linux for a long time. I have tested it but since it only comes with the KDE and XFCE window managers, I never used beyond the testing phase. Then about two weeks ago, Mario Behling, who I met through FOSS Bridge here in Vietnam, introduced me to LXDE.

Ubuntu 8.10 - It’s Great But With A Couple Of Problems

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Ubuntu

blog.programmerslog.com: I am in the process of making my desktop computer into a work computer by removing Windows XP and going down the Ubuntu (8.10 Intrepid Ibex) route. I thought I’d share some of the problems I had.

Smokin' Guns stand alone game released

Filed under
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: The Smokin' Guns game started its life under the name of Western Quake³. It was originally developed by a team known as Iron Claw Interactive. They released WQ3 beta 2.0 in 2003, after which development all but ceased. With the release of the stand alone version in 2008, the game was renamed to Smokin' Guns,

7 Best Free/Open-source Backup Software for Linux

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Software

junauza.com: If you are using Linux, there are plenty of backup software to choose from. I have here a list of some of the best free and open source backup software that you may want to check out.

The Rewriting of Open Source History

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OSS

seekingalpha.com: The open source blogosphere featured two articles the last week of December 2008 that inaccurately draw software-market history timelines from which the authors then inaccurately position the place of open source software in the information technology (IT) market. I doubt if the statements are intentionally misleading; they are most likely the result of ignorance or sloppiness.

KDE 4.1 across Linux distributions

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KDE

reformedmusings.wordpress: I saw some comments on a Linux board recently about KDE 4.1. They said that Kubuntu did a poor job of integrating KDE because Ubuntu with Gnome is the Canonical flagship and that’s where most of the effort goes. That peaked my curiosity.

Speed up Firefox by mounting the profile in tmpfs

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Linux

tmpfs is a virtual, RAM-backed filesystem. It’s lightning-fast, making tmpfs a viable choice for your profile directory. This document gives some tips on how to mount your Firefox profile in a tmpfs partition while minimizing the downsides of tmpfs.

Blackberry tethering (and more) on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
MDV
SUSE
Ubuntu

This article explains how to tether a Blackberry phone - use it as a modem, via a USB cable - in Linux, covering Mandriva, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE and Fedora. It also mentions some other things that the Barry project lets you do with your Blackberry.

few odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • tellico: collection manager for books, videos, music, and a whole lot more

  • New Features in GTK+ 2.15.0
  • Giving life back to an OLD laptop
  • Run Compiz Fusion on Your Mini 9
  • small tip - Which applications are using a given directory
  • FLOSS Weekly #50: Open MPI

Resolutions and mean people

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Linux

castrojo.wordpress: I am going to follow this guy’s saga on switching to Ubuntu for a week. I like his writing style and sarcastic sense of humor. However I found the responses to his problems to be all too common these days.

The For And The Against For Linux

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Linux

informationweek.com/blog: Two responses to things I've written recently are worth commenting on. Both were responses to my post about Windows 7 being more of a previous-version-of-Windows-killer than a Linux-killer -- and both bring up further points to be argued and defended.

7 Reasons Why Pirates Should Jump Ship to Open Source

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OSS

It has always amazed me how many people pirate. As the well-known anti-piracy video clip says, “You wouldn’t steal a car, you wouldn’t steal a handbag,” but people do regularly steal software and other copyrighted materials. They seem to have an innate belief that software should be free.

Technically, pirates don’t steal - they infringe copyright. Neither do they rape, pillage, sink ships, or make people walk the plank into shark-infested waters. The “pirate” label seems to be part of an unsuccessful campaign to encourage people to pay for intellectual property. Calling people names rarely works.

Btrfs For The Mainline Linux Kernel

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Linux

phoronix.com: With the 2.6.29 merge window still open, earlier this week he started a new thread entitled Btrfs for mainline.

How To Install Ubuntu Themes

Filed under
HowTos

iarematt.com: One of the first things I did when I moved from Vista to Ubuntu was install a nice looking theme. The default Ubuntu theme is pretty decent, but I dont like the brown and when browsing posts like this and this, I knew I wanted a sexier look for my laptop.

A tale of too many parameters

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Linux

blog.i-no.de: With 2.6.28 came ext4, which I've been using on several not-so-important filesystems for a while now. I thought I'd kill two birds with one stone and switch back to ext4 on a crypted volume. Shouldn't be all that hard, right?

Amazon MP3 Downloader on openSUSE 11

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HowTos

tuxtraining.com: This HOWTO will explain how to install the Amazon MP3 Downloader application under openSUSE 11 (both 11.0 and 11.1). Unfortunately, as of this writing, Amazon only provides a package for openSUSE 10.3, which will not work directly with 11.0. But you can get the downloader working under 11 with some manual steps.

Choosing a Distro……..

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Linux

armageddon08.wordpress: The first step to start using GNU/Linux is to find out which distribution is the right one for you. So how do you go about choosing the right distro for your computer. Let’s find out.

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Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more

Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android. Read more

Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More

Browsers: Mozilla and Iridium

  • Best Web Browser
    When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser. A direct response to Google Chrome, Firefox Quantum also boasts decreased RAM usage and a more streamlined user interface.
  • Share Exactly What You See On-Screen With Firefox Screenshots
    A “screenshot” is created when you capture what’s on your computer screen, so you can save it as a reference, put it in a document, or send it as an image file for others to see exactly what you see.
  • What Happens when you Contribute, revisited
    I sat down to write a post about my students' experiences this term contributing to open source, and apparently I've written this before (and almost exactly a year ago to the day!) The thing about teaching is that it's cyclic, so you'll have to forgive me as I give a similar lecture here today. I'm teaching two classes on open source development right now, two sections in an introductory course, and another two in a follow-up intermediate course. The students are just starting to get some releases submitted, and I've been going through their blogs, pull requests, videos (apparently this generation likes making videos, which is something new for me), tweets, and the like. I learn a lot from my students, and I wanted to share some of what I'm seeing.
  • Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscience
    Iridium is a web browser based on Chromium project. It has been customized to not share your data and thus keeping your privacy intact.