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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why Linux? 7 Reasons That Make Linux Great srlinuxx 28/02/2012 - 8:09pm
Story Mountain View, California, Penguin Heaven srlinuxx 28/02/2012 - 8:08pm
Story Canonical's Ticking Time Clock srlinuxx 28/02/2012 - 6:59pm
Story FXI Taking Preorders for Cotton Candy USB Computer srlinuxx 1 28/02/2012 - 11:07am
Story Are App Stores Liable for Open Source Software Compliance? srlinuxx 28/02/2012 - 5:50am
Story Open source empowers me srlinuxx 28/02/2012 - 2:59am
Story The Death of Ubuntu One Notes on the Web srlinuxx 28/02/2012 - 2:58am
Story Yep, There's A Linux Appliance For That srlinuxx 28/02/2012 - 2:55am
Story Is Linus' Law real? srlinuxx 28/02/2012 - 12:07am
Story Why Inkscape is WAY ahead of Adobe Illustrator srlinuxx 28/02/2012 - 12:05am

Mandriva adds a semantic layer to the KDE 4 desktop

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Mandriva PR: On the occasion of aKademy 2007, the annual conference of KDE developers and users, Mandriva is proud to announce together with the NEPOMUK partners and the KDE community that the NEPOMUK-KDE project it leads is poised to deliver a sea change in the Linux desktop experience.

Filtering traffic based on thousands of IPs efficiently

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Debian Administration: Trying to insert 70.000 rules in iptables on a recent machine takes about an hour and going through these rules for each packet is even more of a burden. But iptables can send packets to userspace to be handled there. This article describes how to filter network traffic based on thousands of IPs with a new tool called nfqueue efficiently.

TrueCrypt Tutorial: Truly Portable Data Encryption

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TrueCrypt is a free software that encrypts data on-the-fly. Right now the newest version released is version 4.3. You can create an encrypted hard drive, a separate partition or a directory with TrueCrypt.

Ubuntu Dell is $50 Less Than Windows Dell

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the Inquirer: THE SAVING for installing Ubuntu on an Inspiron 1420 is $50 according to the Dell site.

Firewall Builder: A firewall configuration GUI

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Free Software Mag: Have you ever wanted to configure a personal firewall for your GNU/Linux box, but were scared of the complexity of iptables? Well, I might not be able to make you a security expert, but I can show you a tool that will help you to configure your personal firewall the easy way.

gnu units: units converts quantities between different scales

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Debian Package of the Day: units is a command-line tool which performs units conversion between various scales. units is the perfect tool for engineer or scientific workstation, you can call it either interactively from the prompt or within command line. It already handles more than two thousand units and this can be enhanced with your own units in a separate data file.

Are you the Linux type?

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ITtoolbox Blogs: In just about any occupation there are several different types of people. In fact the psychiatrists have them all broken down into nice little boxes. I am no psychiatrist but I play one on the internet and I have noticed that there appears to be some traits that separate those that chose a particular operating system. Perhaps the operating system you are using now doesn't match your personality?

Automatically update your Ubuntu system with cron-apt

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HowTos Updating all the software on your system can be a pain, but with Linux it doesn't have to be that way. We'll show you how to combine the apt package management system with a task scheduler to automatically update your system.

SLED 10 SP1: a great Linux desktop gets better

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DesktopLinux: Sometimes, a service pack comes along that really makes a big difference. Take NT. Before SP3, it was garbage. And, now, with its SP1 for SLED (SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop), Novell has given an already excellent business desktop a real kick in the pants.

DIY: Build Linux From Scratch

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MaximumPC: Noobs getting their first taste of the Linux OS tend to feel a little lost. Even though the Gnome and KDE GUIs are simple and easy to navigate, it's hard to ignore the realization that you don't really know what lurks beneath the surface of this powerful operating system. LFS is an ongoing project designed to turn ordinary users into superusers. Literally.

Linux Tip: Use Google Linux repositories

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lifehacker: Google recently created their own Linux software repositories to streamline the use of Google software in Linux. Google's repos make it very easy to download and stay up-to-date with current releases of Google software.

Kernel space: Linux security non-modules and AppArmor

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LinuxWorld: SELinux offers strict but sometimes difficult-to-manage security. Will a simpler approach, championed by SUSE, make it into the mainstream kernel?

Another reason I love open source software

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The Open Source Advocate: This weekend I was reminded of another reason that I love open source software: A transparent development process. Only in open source software will you be able to talk directly to the developers of a software project and give them your input.

Also: the phrase “open source” goes mainstream


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FOSSwire: So you’ve got your LAMP server up and running, you have some basic pages set up and have maybe even tried WordPress - but what do you do now? Say you have a big site that could potentially have a large userbase. What do you do? Well, you install Drupal!

Get Real or How NOT To Convert Your Grandma to Linux

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polishlinux: Last week I’d been given a chance to make minor language correction to the article Understanding the Common User: All should be simple as it can. This article deals with how to treat people that know nothing about Linux, how to teach them what Linux is about and how not to do it to wrong people.

Disable Single-Click Opening of Files in KDE

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the how-to-geek: Having switched from Ubuntu to Kubuntu recently, the first thing that irritated me beyond all reason was that single-clicking on a file or folder immediately opens the file instead of selecting it. Since I use Windows and Ubuntu on a daily basis, it's just frustrating that it works differently in KDE.

Also: digiKam KDE4 port : another brick in the wall...

Red Hat, Microsoft talk Tux

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desktoplinux: We knew that last year Red Hat CEO Matthew Szulik held talks with Microsoft concerning a patent deal. Once Microsoft and Novell signed an agreement with Novell, those talks were history. In fact, Red Hat made a point of spitting on the Microsoft/Novell deal. That was then. This is now.

Code freeze in preparation of Drupal 6.0

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Drupal ting pages along with a read more link which leads to the full view. Leave empty to auto-generate one from the body. Improved logging functionality, support for reverse proxies, many language system improvements, and improved handling of teasers are among them.

FlightLinux blasts off again

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Software Patrick Stakem wants everyone to know that the newest iteration of FlightLinux is not just for NASA rocket scientists. The special hardened distribution that earlier this century orbited the Earth on an unmanned satellite is set to move into active duty again, this time as a civilian project.

Ripping DVDs to MPEG4 with K9Copy

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Linux App Finder: I've blogged about K9Copy's DVD rip and copy abilities in the past, but I only just noticed that it has added one step rip to MPEG4 support. After taking it for a test drive I'm very pleased with the ease of use and plan to use it for most of my ripping needs in the future.

Also: How to install Amarok in Ubuntu (and get it to play MP3s)

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GParted Live 0.27.0-1 Disk Partitioning Live CD Out Now, Based on GParted 0.27.0

Just one day after announcing the release of the GParted 0.27.0 open-source partition editor software, Curtis Gedak is informing us about the availability of the GParted Live 0.27.0-1 stable release. Read more

Netrunner Core 16.09 "Avalon" Is Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8, KDE Plasma 5.7.5

Today, October 23, 2016, the development team behind the Debian-based Netrunner GNU/Linux distribution proudly announced the release of Netrunner Core 16.09 "Avalon." Read more

today's leftovers

  • Acer updates Chromebook 15 with 12-hour battery life -- $199 exclusively at Walmart
    Chromebooks are not for everyone, but for many home users, it is absolute perfection. If you live in the web browser -- as many people do nowadays -- laptops running Google's Linux-based Chrome OS are a godsend because they are maintenance free. No need for confusing OS upgrades or anti-virus software. It just works, and it works well. Since they can now run Android apps too, they could become a serious threat to Microsoft and Windows 10. One of the most attractive aspects of Chromebooks is price -- they are often quite affordable. Today, Acer refreshes its 15.6 inch Chromebook 15 with a mind-boggling 12 hours of battery life. Best of all? It starts at $199. Yes, this model will get Android app support in a future update too.
  • Of Life, Linux and Karma Angels
    Angel filed appeal after appeal only to be denied on every attempt. Texas is an "at will" employment state so being terminated for cause can mean anything. Over the next few weeks, Angel became more and more fearful of losing her house, as she had just purchased it a year before. On top of that, her HP desktop had taken a nose dive into severe brokeness and that made it extra difficult for her to look for work. I put together a decent desktop for her and installed it that day, and was a Linux computer. Angel didn't have even the slightest problem with the new machine, and she wasn't particularly good at using one. So, let's put another slash in the falsehood that Linux is too hard for the everyday user. Most of them anyway. YMMV. To her glee, the OS picked up and configured her Epson all in one without her lifting a finger to do so. She almost clapped for happiness, stating that in Windows, installing that printer had been a nightmare, even with the included driver CD. And just to pinpoint the time frame for you, it was the summer of 2006.
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided to launch on Linux in November, Mac version delayed
    Feral Entertainment has announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will be launching on Linux in November. Feral Interactive is currently working on the Linux port of the game. In September the game development studio announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided would make its way to two additional platforms: Linux and Mac. The Linux version of the game will most likely make use of OpenGL or Vulkan to power its graphics engine.
  • Mad Max: It Came From The Desert to Linux
    First of all, let me get one thing straight out of the way, so you know where I come from. I did not like the recent Mad Max movie. Like, not at all. Not that I mind the post apocalyptic theme. I used to like the older Mad Max’s just fine (probably the first one the best). The new one…meh. The Max character had virtually no back story (as thin as a sheet of paper) and he was just acting like a crazy person from beginning to end. The story’s premise was boring and just an excuse for endless and not so impressive action scenes. So there was nothing redeeming it. I know this is not the mainstream opinion of the movie (everyone apparently thought it was the best thing ever since sliced bread) so I can only attribute this phenomenon to either mass hysteria or simply a clear decrease in movie expectations. The Force Awakens‘ success, despite being a mediocre movie and certainly underwhelming compared to the original trilogy, certainly echoes the same trend. I guess you cannot beat nostalgia. Just tag a Millennium Falcon on and you get a free ride no matter how incoherent the story or the characters are.
  • Budgie Remix 16.10 Overview
  • I Switched To OpenSuse Tumbleweed :)
  • 50-day Moving Average Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At $76.67
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT) – Is this large market cap stock undervalued?
  • Fedora 25 new features, Perl removed from Build Root
    Fedora is the fast-paced bleeding-edge distribution of Red Hat. Fedora 25 is the second release of 2016 the other being Fedora 24. Let’s discover what lies in the future of this popular Linux distribution especially among developers.
  • "dnf update" considered harmful
    Updating a Linux distribution has historically been done from the command line (using tools like Debian's apt-get, openSUSE's zypper, or Fedora's yum—or its successor dnf). A series of crashes during system updates on Fedora 24 led Adam Williamson to post a note to fedora-devel and other mailing lists warning people away from running "dnf update" within desktop environments. It turns out that doing so has never truly been supported—though it works the vast majority of the time. The discussion around Williamson's note, however, makes it clear that the command is commonly run that way and that at least some users are quite surprised (and unhappy) that it isn't a supported option.
  • Supporting UEFI secure boot in Debian
    The Debian project can be accused of many things, but jumping too quickly on leading-edge technology is not one of them. That can be seen in, among other things, the fact that there is still not a version of the distribution that supports the UEFI secure boot mechanism. But, as Ben Hutchings explained during his 2016 Kernel Recipes talk, such support is in the works, and it will be implemented in a uniquely Debian-like manner.
  • The Lenovo Yoga Book Is the Future of Laptops, But It's Missing an Operating System
    For this review I spent a week with the Android version of Lenovo’s slick new backflipping laptop. Guts-wise it’s identical to the Windows 10 variant. They both feature Intel Atom x5-Z8550 processors, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of on-device storage, and 1920 x 1200 resolution displays. The Android version starts at $500 and the Windows version starts at $550.
  • Another Broken Nexus 5
    In late 2013 I bought a Nexus 5 for my wife [1]. It’s a good phone and I generally have no complaints about the way it works. In the middle of 2016 I had to make a warranty claim when the original Nexus 5 stopped working [2]. Google’s warranty support was ok, the call-back was good but unfortunately there was some confusion which delayed replacement. Once the confusion about the IMEI was resolved the warranty replacement method was to bill my credit card for a replacement phone and reverse the charge if/when they got the original phone back and found it to have a defect covered by warranty. This policy meant that I got a new phone sooner as they didn’t need to get the old phone first. This is a huge benefit for defects that don’t make the phone unusable as you will never be without a phone. Also if the user determines that the breakage was their fault they can just refrain from sending in the old phone.