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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 29 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Interview with Mr.doob srlinuxx 12/12/2011 - 3:49am
Blog entry Subsonic fieldyweb 11/12/2011 - 11:03pm
Story HP open sources WebOS srlinuxx 11/12/2011 - 10:23pm
Blog entry A computer is not a fridge... fieldyweb 11/12/2011 - 9:24pm
Blog entry Spideroak. Doing Dropbox better than Dropbox.. fieldyweb 11/12/2011 - 8:39pm
Story Calibre the most annoying ever srlinuxx 11/12/2011 - 8:10pm
Story Debian 5.0 approaches end of life srlinuxx 11/12/2011 - 7:57pm
Blog entry Lastpass. fieldyweb 11/12/2011 - 7:41pm
Story Pioneer Interview srlinuxx 11/12/2011 - 7:40pm
Story The Linux Link Tech Show srlinuxx 11/12/2011 - 7:36pm

Windows Security vs Linux Security

Filed under
OS

moddaily: You might of heard that Windows has the most virus written for it out of all the operating system’s, you might not have heard that approximately 1,000 virus are found for Windows every month! You probably won’t know that Linux systems have less than a 100 virus written for it, but enough of the facts.

Ubuntu 7.04 on a MacBook

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Friendly Linux: When I got my MacBook almost a year ago, I instantly fell in love in OS X - it’s Unix, it’s compatible and it’s pretty, but the love wasn’t truly returned. Sure, OS X has some cool stuff bundled, and sure, it’s easy to install and remove stuff in OS X, but well, I just didn’t feel free to do whatever I wanted, so I decided that it was time to replace OS X with something better.

Microsoft trounces pro-ODF forces in state battles over open document formats

Filed under
OSS

computerworld: In a resounding victory for Microsoft Corp., bills seeking to mandate the use of open document formats by government agencies have been defeated in five states, and only a much-watered-down version of such legislation was signed into law in a sixth state.

Business vs Community: Xandros and PCLinuxOS compared

Filed under
Linux

polishlinux: This article is a comparison and a review of two Linux distributions that got a lot of attention recently. We will compare a fully commercial Xandros Desktop and more community-friendly PCLinuxOS.

Some Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Command line tutorial - splitting files into smaller chunks

  • How to take a delayed screen shot using the command line in Ubuntu
  • Mount and Unmount ISO,MDF,NRG Images Using AcetoneISO (GUI Tool)

The Perfect Desktop - Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Fedora 7 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

KDE 4.0: KDE2 2.0

Filed under
KDE

/home/liquidat: After the final freeze of KDE 3.X I had some thoughts about KDE 4.0 and the expectations the people will have. After all I read it reminded me a bit of everything I read about KDE 2.0.

Also: First Plasma Screen Cast online

KLone: C web programming framework

Filed under
Software

DPotD: KLone is a web application development framework that takes HTML with C embedded in as its input and turns it all into a single binary that is the server and the web app in one package.

Integrating Firefox and Thunderbird into KDE

Filed under
HowTos

FreeSoftwareMag: Ever since I first fired up KDE on openSuSE, I’ve been in love. But there’s always been one nagging thing. Firefox and Thunderbird stick out like two sore thumbs. They don’t look like KDE apps (see figure 1 and figure 4), they don’t work with KDE programs (like KPrinter), and they just don’t feel like they belong in KDE. Luckily, since both of these apps have support for add-ons, it is easy to remedy this.

Kiba-Dock—The Interactive Dock Toolbar Redefined

Filed under
Software

J_K9 @ Linux: Anyone who has used a Mac will be familiar with the “Dock.” Why would we want one on Linux? There is a certain Dock which takes it even further—it provides a physics engine (Akamaru), allowing you to hurl and bounce the icons around your screen. It’s called Kiba-Dock.

Make Ubuntu Faster: File System Boost

Filed under
HowTos

Electronic Analysis: I was getting tired of Ubuntu running slower than Windows XP. I looked around online and found some guides. I decided to post about them here for two reasons: I would like to have all the info in one place, I think the more people that know about these tweaks the better. I will start with making your file system faster.

How to install Flock Web Browser in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu Geek: Flock is an amazing new web browser that makes it easier to share media and connect to other people online. Share photos, automatically stay up-to-date with new content from your favourite sites, and search the Web with the most advanced Search Toolbar available today.

My Favorite Firefox Shortcut Keys

Filed under
Moz/FF

technologyevangelist: I'm a big fan of using the keyboard rather than a mouse whenever possible. It's so much faster to keep my hands hovering over the keys. FireFox has a ton of great keyboard shortcuts that will help you save milliseconds.

What happens to Novell, post Microsoft?

Filed under
SUSE

zdnet blogs: Novell is becoming too reliant on Microsoft. And given the third version of the General Public License could hamper the partnership that’s no idle concern. The sales pop from Microsoft is waning for Novell. More optimistic analysts call this waning “normalizing.”

One year with Linux

Filed under
Linux

dive into mark: One year ago, I switched to Linux for a variety of reasons revolving around software freedom, choice, and data preservation. I have spent some time tweaking, but only by choice — not to make things work, but to try some radically different ideas.

Ubuntu and DELL

Filed under
Ubuntu

Eugenia's rants: Oh, my f****** God. So, if you buy a Dell machine with Ubuntu in it and you configure it using the available options, there is a good chance that Ubuntu Linux won’t manage to auto-configure itself to adjust to the newly added/modified hardware.

Music 101: The Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring song recipe

Filed under
HowTos

mandriva club wiki: Recently I was asked to write a small article talking about some of the tools related to audio in Mandriva Spring. I realized that writing a few things about the tools would be just the same as articles you can find in many websites and magazines. But instructions on creating music step from step from scratch, picking the right ingredients for "the song recipe", are rarely to be found. So I decided to try and make a song with only the tools I had available on Mandriva Spring, and write down how to do it.

Howto: Change / Setup bash custom prompt (PS1)

Filed under
HowTos

nixcraft: Most of us work with a shell prompt. By default most Linux distro displays hostname and current working directory. You can easily customize your prompt to display information important to you. You change look and feel by adding colors.

First KRDC Sceenshot!

urs’ blog: As I have promised some days ago: Here is the first screenshot of the new KRDC mainwindow. Smile Please keep in mind that I am at an early state of development. A lot is not completed yet and will change.

Roll your own Fedora 7! (In RAM, yet!)

Filed under
Linux

fluxam @ livejournal: Fedora 7 64-bit is how I'm posting this using the Scribefire/Performancing extension in Firefox 2.0.0.3 -- supposedly a 64-bit build, since I'm running the 64-bit Fedora. I was startled when I saw the option of loading into RAM when I booted off the 835 Mb DVD, and again surprised when the DVD was ejected after being read into RAM.

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More in Tux Machines

Alphabet's Plans to Create Android PCs Should Make Microsoft a Little Nervous

Four years after Microsoft (MSFT) first tried to give the world unified PC/mobile operating systems via the dual fiascoes known as Windows 8 and Windows RT, Alphabet's (GOOGL) Google appears set to take its own stab at the concept. And there are reasons to think the company will see a measure of success. Citing "two independent and reliable sources," Android Police reports Google plans to launch a notebook in the third quarter of 2017 that will likely be the first new device to showcase Andromeda, a version of Android that will integrate many features associated with Google's Chrome OS PC operating system. The notebook will reportedly be called the Pixel 3, and carry a $788 price. Its feature set reportedly include a 12.3-inch display, an Intel (INTC) processor, a glass trackpad, a tablet mode and stylus support. Read more

Servers/Networks

  • Linux servers deliver greater performance and efficiency 'than available on any x86-based server'
  • What are configuration management tools?
    For most people, computers don't stay the same. Software is added, removed, and updated. Configurations are changed. Think about the changes you've made to your computer since the first time you booted it up. Now imagine making those changes to 10, 100, or 1,000 more computers. Configuration management tools are what make implemententing and enforcing these changes possible.
  • 5 new OpenStack tutorials and guides
  • Ericsson: The Journey to a DevOps Future in SDN
    There are big transformations going on in the world today that are driving rapid changes to the business of networks, said Santiago Rodriguez, VP of Engineering and head of the product development unit SDN & Policy Control at Ericsson, in his keynote Tuesday at OpenDaylight Summit. “Society is transforming, the way we do business is transforming, and accordingly the way we build our networks is transforming,” Rodriguez said. The three pillars of this network transformation include: 5G, virtualization and open source.
  • OpenDaylight sets product quality label, metrics for SDN solutions
    Initial OpenDaylight-based products expected to receive the "Powered by OpenDaylight" mark are offerings from Brocade, Ericsson, HPE, Inocybe and Serro.
  • Telstra Sees Quadrupled Data Capacity by 2020
    The latter service led Telstra to re-think its fiber deployment strategy, choosing to use pre-provisioned fiber connections to data centers in advance of customer demand, because the company knew that demand was coming, Blackall said. The strategy worked well with Telstra's acquisition of Pacnet, which had already deployed SDN capabilities to connect its 27 points of presence around Asia.

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Valve's Steam Controller With SteamOS/Linux Support Is Now Listed For Just $35
    If you have been put off from ordering a Steam Controller for your SteamOS/Linux gaming system due to the $50 USD price-tag, it's been marked down to $35. Back in June it was temporarily reduced to $35 USD but then a few days later shot back up to $50 at major Internet retailers. Judging from those that clicked our Amazon links, it was of interest to many readers. If you missed that discount the first time around, the Steam Controller is back to being listed as a $34.99 product. It's not clear how long this deal will last or if it is permanent -- there has been speculations about a "Steam Controller 2" but I haven't seen any public confirmation yet.
  • Game Developer Chooses To Connect With Pirates, Reaps Rewards As A Result
    One imagines that this kind of thing builds up goodwill amongst potential buyers of PM Studio games. Some of the comments on the thread state as much. It won't do anything with the pure-pirate folks out there, but, then again, nothing will. Worrying about those that were never going to buy the game would have been wasted time and energy. Instead, the developer chose to try to win over those that might indeed want to support its efforts. Here's hoping PM Games gets the positive reinforcement needed to confirm that this kind of thing is the right way to deal with piracy. And that other studios are paying attention, as well.
  • InXile Entertainment announced Wasteland 3, will use crowdfunding on fig
    I'm going off their twitter and other sites for the main info right now, as it seems we are still not on InXile's press list. It is already confirmed to have Linux support, along with multiplayer, vehicles, and some form of base building.

Software Company Red Hat banks on India to hit $ 5 billion turnover in 5 years

Red Hat, the open-source software company, said its India business was growing at more than double the rate of the overall company and would be an important contributor to its target of reaching $5 billion in the next five years. Red Hat has over $2 billion in annual revenue currently and grew over 21% in constant currency last year. Open-source software is freely available, so Red Hat’s business model depends on customers paying for the support and service it offers and not on license fees, making the company’s offerings typically cheaper than proprietary software. “India is one of our fastest growing markets. Red Hat does really when there is net new infrastructure to be set up. And the rapid pace of development that India is seeing sets really well with our offerings,” James Whitehurst, CEO of Red Hat, told ET. Read more