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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 24 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox 6.0.2 and 3.6.22 available srlinuxx 07/09/2011 - 12:01pm
Story various leftovers: srlinuxx 07/09/2011 - 10:52am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 06/09/2011 - 9:50pm
Story Bridging Linux and Windows: Top Apps srlinuxx 06/09/2011 - 9:33pm
Story Open Australasia government srlinuxx 06/09/2011 - 9:31pm
Story Ubuntu 11.10 Beta 1 Review And Screenshots srlinuxx 06/09/2011 - 7:50pm
Story Linux for me, Linux for you. srlinuxx 06/09/2011 - 7:43pm
Story Linux turns 20: Progress report on world domination srlinuxx 06/09/2011 - 7:38pm
Story Parted Magic 6.6 review – general-purpose recovery distro srlinuxx 06/09/2011 - 7:20pm
Story Make XFCE4 look a bit like Unity srlinuxx 06/09/2011 - 7:16pm

Free Security Apps for Linux

Filed under
Software

Here is a short list of the most popular security applications for linux. I will be updating this with links shortly.

Clam AntiVirus Popular antivirus solution for UNIX based machines. Includes real time virus scanning and a virus definition database updated several times per day.

AVScan Front-end for Clam AntiVirus.

5 reasons not to trust Microsoft near Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Microsoft has never made much secret of the fact that keeping rival browsers down is a key part of its business plan.

Fonty Python and the Holy Grail of a font manager

Filed under
Software

For designers, a font manager that can activate and deactivate fonts on-the-fly is the Holy Grail of the GNU/Linux desktop. Without such a tool, designers either need to devote an inordinate amount of system memory to their font collections, or else install and uninstall fonts individually, manually keeping track of the fonts needed for each project.

Amarok Weekly News #8 released

Filed under
KDE

A new issue of the Amarok newsletter is out. It talks about interesting new developments, Amarok's Summer of Code projects, the current events in the 1.4 stable branch, and continues to provide cool Amarok-related tips.

A quick overview of Desktop BSD 1.3

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

Being a huge fan of FreeBSD and a big fan of Linux, I’ve sometimes found myself torn between the two. I love FreeBSD for its simplicity, it’s structure, and how tight and clean it is. Linux is similar to that, but not quite as clean, and definitely not as tight and simple.

Tux Takes His Place on Chastain Motorsports Indy Car

Filed under
Linux

Tux, the cherubic penguin mascot of the Linux computer operating system has just taken up residence on the front nose of the Chastain Motorsports Panoz / Honda Indy car.

First thoughts on Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

Yesterday I downloaded a copy of Ubuntu's latest release, version 7.04 Feisty Fawn. The download took some hours because of busy servers but I think that it was well worth it.

Linux this year and next

Filed under
Linux

Just when you think you understand Linux development, along comes something new. "There are no road d project's camera driver, and editor of the popular Linux site LWN.

"A lot of what's going to be in future kernels is already out there if you know where to look for it," Corbet explained at the Embedded Linux Conference Wednesday in Santa Clara, Calif.

Automatically remount filesystems on reboot

Filed under
HowTos

Recently, I took a quick look at the Unix concept of mount points. Performing the mount command is a nice easy way to get access to something on a one-off.

A lot of the time, however, you’ll want to set it up so the system permanently mounts said filesystem - so on reboot, you don’t have to run all of the commands again.

Speed Tweaking PCLinuxOS 2007 TR3

Filed under
PCLOS
HowTos

Using PCLinuxOS 2007 TR3 for the last few weeks, I’ve noticed VAST improvements over the .93a release. The most noticable of these is boot times. My boot time is absolutely amazing on this Dell E521n...it averages 30-40 seconds. That’s right. 30-40 SECONDS. I was floored the first time I booted after install. I thought I had done something wrong.

SUM-thing new for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

OK, you love Ubuntu, but after awhile, the same-old, same-old GRUB and boot splash screens become tedious and boring. Could it be your Ubuntu needs a little SUM-thing to spice it up? If you're up for a walk on the wild side, try StartUp Manager (SUM), a utility created by Glenn Van Loon that lets you change bootloader and splash screen settings in Ubuntu.

Ten things you didn't know about open source

Filed under
OSS

One of the world's leading advocates of the open source software movement, Brian Bahlendorf gave a talk at the Digital Freedom Expo at the University of the Western Cape on Thursday, entitled "Ten things you may not know about open source".

Behlendorf was a key developer of the Apache Web server, upon which more than half the world's websites run.

OpenSUSE 10.2: AMD/ATI Drivers Installation

Filed under
HowTos

I got overwhelming e-mails asking me how to install properly ATI drivers under openSUSE 10.2. I directed them to different sites, including a reference to one of mine that I wrote for SUSE 10.1, but seems like they are still having problems. Instead of explaining to everyone on an individual basis I decided to make a fresh post.

Image processing with ImageMagick, qiv and friends

Filed under
HowTos

The linux desktop with the wide choice of Window managers and the ample supply of eye candy is a constant source of envy for Windoze users.

Without images and colors, the linux desktop would not be of much interest to Windows people.

A beginner's guide to IRC

Filed under
HowTos

If you have questions about Linux or open source projects, real-time help is often just a keyboard away -- if you know where to look online. Forums, mailing lists, and Googling are all useful when you have questions, but if you really want answers fast, Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is the place to look. If you've never ventured into IRC, here's all you need to get started.

Burning CDs in GNOME

Filed under
Software

The GNOME desktop environment comes with a simple and single-minded CD burner application built into the Nautilus file manager (not dissimilar to what Microsoft bundles with Windows XP’s Windows Explorer and Vista’s Explorer) that can handle a lot of your file burning needs. But what do you do if you need more complex tasks done, like burning or ripping an ISO file, or creating an audio CD?

Open source protester crashes speech by Bill Gates at Chinese University

Filed under
OSS

A protester calling for free computer software and open source programming crashed a speech Friday by Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates at one of China's top universities.

UNLV Firefox users get help

Filed under
Moz/FF

The University of Nevada Office of Information Technology has announced, with great fanfare, its decision to offer technical support for the Mozilla Firefox Internet browser. This week, the Student Computing Support Center on the second floor of the Student Union has been hosting an open house to promote Firefox.

Fallen Under the Spell of Arch Voodoo

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

I received an email the other day from a visitor saying how much he enjoyed reading my reviews, but he was a disappointed as it seems tuxmachines had been ignoring his favorite distro.

Linux is an orchestra and you are the conductor

Filed under
Linux

The purists are forever crying out that the word Linux refers to the kernel only. True. However for the general public the word has come to mean a collection of programs making up an operating system in the same way an orchestra means a collection of musical instruments and musicians.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Graphics

EXT4, Btrfs, XFS & NILFS2 HDD File-System Tests On Linux 4.8 (and More Linux Kernel News)

Up until running the tests for today's article, I can't remember the last time I touched a hard drive... It's been many months ago at least. Nearly all of our tests at Phoronix are from solid state storage, but I decided to pick up a new HDD for running some Linux file-system tests on a conventional hard drive for those not having an SSD. Via NewEgg.com I saw a good deal on a refurbished Hitachi Ultrastar HUA72302 "Enterprise" Hard Drive with 2TB of storage, 7200 RPM, 64MB cache, Serial ATA 3.0, and backed by HGST with a five-year warranty. For just over $30 USD it was a deal and decided to order it for running some modern Linux HDD file-system tests for curiosity sake. Read more Also: What's Been Going On With CPUFreq & The Scheduler Polychromatic Provides A Nice UI To Razer Keyboards/Mice On Linux

Red Hat Financial News

FOSS content management systems (CMS)

  • How to Resolve Your Open Content Management Quandary
    After years of development and competition, open source content management systems (CMS) have proliferated and are very powerful tools for building, deploying and managing web sites, blogs and more. You're probably familiar with some of the big names in this arena, including Drupal (which Ostatic is based on) and Joomla. As we noted in this post, selecting a CMS to build around can be a complicated process, since the publishing tools provided are hardly the only issue. The good news is that free, sophisticated guides for evaluating CMS systems have flourished. There are even good options for trying open CMS systems online before you choose one. Here, in this newly updated post, you'll find some very good resources. he first thing to pursue as you evaluate CMS systems to deploy, including the many free, good platforms, is an overview of what is available. CMSMatrix.org is a great site for plotting out side-by-side comparisons of what CMS systems have to offer. In fact, it lets you compare the features in over 1200 content management system products. Definitely take a look. This site also has a good overview of the options.
  • Postleaf is an open-source blogging platform for the design-conscious
    Content management systems are boring until you have to use one. You can install a little Drupal or WordPress, pick up some Squarespace, or just dump to Medium, the graveyard for posts about protein shakes and VC funding. But what if you could roll your own CMS? And what if you made it really cool? That’s what Cory LaViska did. LaViska is the founder of SurrealCMS and has been making it easy to edit stuff on the web for nine years. Rather than build and sell an acceptable CMS, however, he took all of his best ideas and made a far better CMS. And he made it open source and called it Postleaf.