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Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Researchers accuse Google of plotting to undercut Firefox srlinuxx 1 15/12/2011 - 12:38am
Story Linux Mint Agree Amazon Revenue Share srlinuxx 1 15/12/2011 - 12:19am
Blog entry Subsonic Media Streamer 4.6: The Proper Review fieldyweb 14/12/2011 - 11:06pm
Story Ubuntu-related Xmas Gift Ideas srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 10:40pm
Story Plasma Active Two Released srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 10:26pm
Story CentOS vs. Oracle vs. Scientific Linux 6.1 Performance srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 10:24pm
Story Can open source save the planet? srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 10:22pm
Story Fedora 16 KDE review srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 8:26pm
Story Kernel Log: Coming in 3.2 (Part 4) – Infrastructure srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 7:59pm
Story Scribes: A Sturdy Reinvention of the Text Editor srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 6:07pm

openmeetings - Open source video conferencing and collaboration with OpenLaszlo

Filed under
Software

zdnet blogs: Sebastian Wagner has released an open source project called openmeetings. openmeetings is billed as a “video conferencing and group collaboration application” much like Adobe Connect. This one is built on top of OpenLaszlo with the new streaming media support and Red5, and open source media sever.

Microsoft's shady deals with Xandros and Novell

Filed under
Microsoft

CLICK: By making "intellectual property" deals with commercially oriented distributors of Linux, Microsoft isn't alienating anybody it hasn't turned off already.

Also: Xandros Deal Isn't Identical to Novell's: Picking One's Way Around the GPL?

Free Software Magazine Issue 18

Filed under
OSS

Issue 18 is here and with it another bunch of great articles all about free software. We have Andrew Min showing us how to dual-boot Windows and Kubuntu. There's Mitch Meyran's in depth article on 3D desktops and Xavier Calbet's one on Fractal generation.

After Ubuntu, Windows Looks Increasingly Bad

Filed under
Ubuntu

sys-con.com: My recent switch to a single-boot Ubuntu setup on my Thinkpad T60 simply floors me on a regular basis. It has some elegance to it - bet you never heard that about a Linux desktop before.

Novell's Nightmare Microsoft's Halo Only Stretches So Far

Filed under
SUSE

sys-con.com: OK, so let's cut right to what everybody wants to know. In the two quarters since its hackles-raising deal with Microsoft was signed in November, some 49,000 SUSE certificates have been activated. They are worth $91 million. Microsoft could buy more. Unless of course the GPLv3 intervenes and the tentative grandfather clause currently protecting the deal gets dropped.

Also: Strengths of Open Source opposing Microsoft patent threats

Firefox flaws raise Mozilla security doubts

Filed under
Moz/FF

LinuxWorld: The Mozilla Foundation said last week it has patched several serious security flaws in the popular Firefox browser, bugs that also affect the SeaMonkey browser and the Thunderbird e-mail application.

Also: New zero-day bugs crop up in IE, Firefox

Automatix - A Review…sort of

Filed under
Software

shift+backspace: For those of you who use Ubuntu and have not heard of Automatix, stop reading and go get it! Automatix contains many dozens of applications that help make the initial Ubuntu set up so much easier.

June 2007 (#139) Issue of Linux Gazette Online

Filed under
Linux

This month's issue of Linux Gazette is ready and online. This month's highlights include Creating an Unkillable Process, Installing Perl Modules as a Non-Root User, and Writing PostgreSQL Functions in C.

Sidux vs. Mint: Can You Live the Pure Open Source Life?

Filed under
Linux
-s

There are valid and compelling reasons why one might want to use only Open Source Software. Avoids any patent or IP legal issues, better security, and encourages innovation are just a few. Many, like myself, would like to be completely Open Source if it didn't mean losing too much functionality. Can your computer environment be entirely Open Source? What might we give up if we chose that path?

The KDE 3.5 Control Center - Part 10 - System Administration

Filed under
KDE

Raiden's Realm: Today's section, System Administration, covers a lot of administration of various features of KDE, including how it handles logins, date and time, and more. This is not for the fait of heart, and you can make a mess of things to the point of even locking yourself out of KDE.

Dell Offers Ubuntu, What About OpenOffice?

Filed under
OOo

SolidOffice: One of the other top ideas on Dell’s IdeaStorm website was to preinstall OpenOffice (and Firefox, and some other FOSS apps) on the Windows boxes Dell sells. From a simple end user standpoint, this option would benefit a larger number of Dell customers.

Encrypt and sign Gmail messages with FireGPG

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Gmail may be an excellent Web-based email application, but there is no easy way to use it with privacy tools like GnuPG. The FireGPG extension for Firefox is designed to solve this problem. It integrates nicely into Gmail's interface and allows you to sign and encrypt not only email messages but also text snippets from any Web page.

Xandros Takes Microsoft's Linux Patent Protection

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Xandros and Microsoft today announced they have entered into an agreement that, on the surface, is remarkably similar to the one forged between Microsoft and Novell last year.

Typing Break and WorkRave: Keep RSI at Bay

Filed under
Software

Ubuntu Blog: GNOME is very advanced when it comes to providing methods to save your hands. There is the Typing Break in GNOME’s keyboard preferences dialog, but for those of us who are not satisfied with a fly swatter to swat flies, there is workrave.

The new OpenOffice.org Charting Tool Coming in OpenOffice.org 2.3

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: For anyone who has grown weary of the current OpenOffice chart tool, or for anyone who has attended my classes and grown alarmed at hearing that charting is as much art as science, there is some relief in sight.

The Perfect Server - CentOS 4.5 (32-bit)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a CentOS 4.5 server that offers all services needed by ISPs and web hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

KeyJnote: A nifty engine for your presentations

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you need to create a presentation every now and then, but you find OpenOffice.org Impress too complicated and bulky, check out KeyJnote, a tool that turns any PDF document or set of graphics files into a professional-quality presentation with impressive transition effects.

Top 5 Linux Misconceptions

OSWeekly: I could hardly believe the words in this blog piece from ZDNET. Surely, I must have missed something along the way? But rather than bad mouthing yet another "hot air" article, I will look at each point to see where our opinions differ.

FNB switches 12 000 desktops to Linux

Filed under
Linux

tectonic: Following recent reports of a South African bank eyeing out Linux, Novell South Africa today issued a statement in which it said it had reached an agreement with First National Bank of South Africa to standardise the bank's 12 000 desktops in its 680 retail branches on Novell's Linux product.

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today's leftovers

  • Linux Unable To Boot Lenovo Yoga 900 & 900; Is Microsoft At Fault?
    The popular device developer Lenovo has verified the claims that Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s unable to boot Linux OS but only Microsoft Windows 10. The new Lenovo convertible laptop, Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s, would reject and decline any attempt to install Linux operating system, making users turn their heads to Microsoft as the suspect for this issue. [...] This issue about the OS started when an identity of BaronHK posted on Reddit about installing Linux on the latest Lenovo Yoga book in which BaronHK encountered being blocked by a locked solid state drive (SSD) which Linux cannot define itself, and come up to link the issue to Microsoft.
  • How Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2 Performance Compares To Some Other Linux Distros
    The final Ubuntu 16.10 Beta for "Yakkety Yak" was released this week and we found its performance doesn't differ much from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (with the exception of the newer graphics stack) while here are some results comparing it to other modern Linux distributions. Tested for this quick, one-page-article comparison were Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2, Clear Linux 10660, Fedora 24, openSUSE Tumbleweed 20160927, and the Arch-based Antergos 16.9-Rolling release.
  • Qt 3D WIP branches
  • New Qt 3D Functionality Is Being Worked On
    Sean Harmer of KDAB is organizing work around some upcoming "major Qt 3D features" for the open-source toolkit. It's not known if the next round of Qt 3D features will be ready for the Qt 5.9 tool-kit release, but KDAB is looking to have these new branches for feature work with continuous integration coverage.
  • Cross-compiling WebKit2GTK+ for ARM
    Of course, I know for a fact that many people use local recipes to cross-compile WebKit2GTK+ for ARM (or simply build in the target machine, which usually takes a looong time), but those are usually ad-hoc things and hard to reproduce environments locally (or at least hard for me) and, even worse, often bound to downstream projects, so I thought it would be nice to try to have something tested with upstream WebKit2GTK+ and publish it on trac.webkit.org,
  • Should we drop Vala?
    Is it Vala development a waste of time? Is Vala suitable for long term support libraries?
  • SUSECON 2016: Where Technology Reigns Supreme [Ed: “Article Sponsor: SUSE”]
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/39
  • Free software activities in September 2016

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.6 Is Out with MIPS and OCFS2 Improvements, Updated Drivers
    Today, September 30, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the sixth maintenance update to the latest stable Linux 4.7 kernel series. Linux kernel 4.7.6 comes only five days after the release of the previous maintenance version, Linux kernel 4.7.5, and, according to the appended shortlog and the diff from the last update, it changes a total of 76 files, with 539 insertions and 455 deletions. In summary, it updates multiple drivers, adds improvements to various filesystems and hardware architectures, and improves the networking stack.
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.23 LTS Has ARM and MIPS Improvements, Updated Filesystems, More
    Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.6, Greg Kroah-Hartman proudly informed the community about the general availability of the Linux 4.4.23 LTS kernel. The Linux 4.4 kernel is a long-term supported branch, the latest and most advanced one, used in many stable and reliable GNU/Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Alpine Linux 3.4. Therefore, it is imperative for it to receive regular updates that bring fixes to the most important issues, as well as other general improvements.
  • From NFS to LizardFS
    If you’ve been following me for a while, you’ll know that we started our data servers out using NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit some load problems, switched to btrfs, hit load problems again, tried a hacky workaround, ran into problems, dropped DRBD for glusterfs, had a major disaster, switched back to NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit more load problems, and finally dropped DRBD for ZFS.
  • IBM's Ginni Rometty Tells Bankers Not To Rest On Their Digital Laurels
  • BUS1, The Successor To KDBUS, Formally Unveiled -- Aiming For Mainline Linux Kernel
    BUS1 has been in development as an in-kernel IPC mechanism building off the failed KDBUS project. An "RFC" will soon be sent out to Linux kernel developers about BUS1 and the subject will be discussed at next month's Kernel Summit. David Herrmann, one of the BUS1 developers, presented at this week's systemd.conf conference about the new capability-based IPC for Linux. He talked about how BUS1 is superior to KDBUS, how BUS1 is similar to Android's Binder, Chrome's Mojo, Solaris' Doors, and other common IPC implementations.
  • A New Wireless Daemon Is In Development To Potentially Replace wpa_supplicant
    In addition to the BUS1 presentation, also exciting from the systemd.conf 2016 conference is a thorough walkthrough of a new wireless daemon for Linux being developed by Intel's Open-Source Technology Center. Intel has been developing a new wireless daemon for Linux to potentially replace wpa_supplicant. This new daemon isn't yet public but the code repositories for it will be opened up in the next few weeks. This new daemon has improvements around persistency, WiFi management, reduced abstractions for different operating systems and legacy interfaces, and changes to operation. This daemon is designed to be very lightweight and work well for embedded Linux use-cases especially, including IoT applications.