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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story To the space station and beyond with Linux srlinuxx 1 07/05/2013 - 11:54pm
Story Best Linux photo editors srlinuxx 07/05/2013 - 8:45pm
Story Red Hat CEO: We don't need Microsoft to succeed srlinuxx 07/05/2013 - 8:34pm
Story Linux still "benchmark of quality" in this year's Coverity Scan srlinuxx 07/05/2013 - 8:32pm
Story 5 Linux Distributions With Fastest Boot Speeds srlinuxx 06/05/2013 - 4:31pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 506 srlinuxx 06/05/2013 - 4:29pm
Story Debian 7.0 is Finally Here srlinuxx 06/05/2013 - 4:27pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 06/05/2013 - 4:59am
Blog entry Ubuntu 13.04 raring to go on Acer C7 Chromebook fieldyweb 04/05/2013 - 2:49pm
Blog entry Using a Chromebook to develop in the cloud… fieldyweb 04/05/2013 - 2:46pm

Open Source Gaming Review: Wormux 0.8

Filed under
Gaming

raiden's realm: For anyone who ever loved and played the famous Worms PC game series, then Wormux is the game for you. Even if you weren't much of a fan (like myself) of the original Works series, you'll find Wormux none the less captivating and enjoyable, and even addictive in some respects.

Managing and configuring downloads with KGet

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftware mag: Downloading—no matter what operating system you are using—is ubiquitous. If you’ve been on the internet you will have downloaded something at some point. This article will take a detailed look at KGet, a very versatile GUI download manager for the KDE desktop which is easy to use and has plenty of easily configurable options.

Licensing for laymen - GPL explained

Filed under
OSS

tectonic: The GPL was first developed by Free Software Foundation founder, Richard Stallman in 1989. The licence challenged standard proprietary licences, supplanting the familiar copyright with copyleft.

Hands on: Command post

Filed under
HowTos

personal computer world: Although it is often seen as old-fashioned, the shell can make certain tasks easier and faster to perform than loading up a GUI application to do the same, and it is definitely worth getting to know.

Mac and Linux fail to capitalise on Vista mistakes

Filed under
OS

the inquirer: IT LOOKS like the Mac OS-X and Linux operating system have failed to do any damage to Microsoft Windows, despite the Vista fiasco.

Firefox extensions for tab addicts

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: For Firefox users who are constantly referring to multiple pages, tabbed browsing is not a feature, but a way of life. There are enough of us that the Firefox addon page lists more than 110 extensions related to tabs. If you regularly have more than half a dozen tabs open, you might also want to consider Multiple Tab Handler.

Latest OpenSUSE a mixed bag for educators

Filed under
SUSE

zdnet: It took a while, but I finally downloaded the full DVD image for Novell’s OpenSUSE 10.3. A single-CD install is also available, but I wanted to have the full library of additional software available to me, as well as all of the non-open source software not included on the CD, so I braved hours of file sharing, all in the name of ZDNet blogs.

The chicken or the egg: Ubuntu on ftp.gnome.org

Filed under
Ubuntu

beranger: A few minutes ago, I went to ftp://ftp.gnome.org/. The first thing I noticed was that releases is a symlink to mirror/ubuntu-releases/. Is Ubuntu that important to consume GNOME's bandwidth?

Gentoo Tutorial part 2: Adding goodies to the system.

Filed under
Gentoo
HowTos

futurepages.net: This is the second part of the Gentoo Tutorials. In the first section “Minimal Gentoo Installation” we have built a fresh Gentoo system using the minimal install disk and downloading the stages/ports and building the kernel. This left us with a bare Gentoo OS. In this second Gentoo Tutorial we are going to customize and add different software to the system.

MPlayer 1.0rc2 released

Filed under
Software

mplayerhq: It's been a while, but we are still around and have decided that it's time to funnel our steady stream of daily changes into a release again.

How to upgrade Ubuntu from Feisty Fawn to Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
HowTos

blog.mypapit.net: The new release of Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) is just around the corner! With all these new features and latest softwares from repositories, I think it makes no sense not to upgrade to Gutsy Gibbon unless if you don’t have a fast internet connection or way too crazy to upgrade.

Also: Howto Auto mount a drive in DOSBOX

Get down with OpenBSD rock

Filed under
BSD

tectonic: Continuing their quirky habit of releasing a song for each new release the OpenBSD team has released the official 4.2 song. OpenBSD leader Theo de Raadt describes it as "mid-era Rush song".

Why SUSE Why ?

Filed under
SUSE

techzone: SUSE 10.3 was released and I had to try it. All geared up, I started downloading the torrent of the KDE version. I think this the the worst install experience I had in last one year. I was spoiled by the likes of PCLinuxOS, Ubuntu, Granular and Mint Linux.

A Day in OpenSuSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

jon-reagan.blogspot: After hearing OpenSuSE 10.3 had been released and had a CD available, I decided to give it a quick test drive.

Why do i always revert back to Ubuntu ?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Zero Effect: Every time I try a new distro I find my self reverting back to Ubuntu soon after I install it. The first one was back when Mandriva 2007 spring was released. The second time was just yesterday after installing openSUSE 10.3 gnome cd.

Ten Ways to Make More Humane Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

humanized.com: A lot of bandwidth has been wasted arguing over the lack of usability in open-source software/free software (henceforth “OSS”). The debate continues at this moment on blogs, forums, and Slashdot comment threads. Meanwhile, as these arguments swirl, I’ve been quietly relying on OSS to get my work done.

KDE 4.0 Beta 3 release tagging this Monday?

Filed under
KDE

/home/liquidat: The KDE 4.0 Beta 3 release was shifted again - the tagging will be this Monday. If everything works out we will see KDE 4.0 Beta 3 this week.

Advantages of open source: Revisited

Filed under
OSS

Tristan Rhodes: I feel that is important for me to further analyze the benefits of open source software. This post should provide a more balanced view of open source and the intrinsic benefits that free software provides.

Installing MonoDevelop from Source on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

how-to-geek: After reading a post from my friend Daniel about the new release of MonoDevelop, I decided to try and install it… which is when I realized that the installation from source is so painful I'd better figure it out and share it with everybody else.

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More in Tux Machines

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.

Development News

  • Oh, the things Vim could teach Silicon Valley's code slingers
    Vim text editor turned 25 late last year – the first public iteration was launched on November 2, 1991, a couple of weeks after Linus Torvalds announced Linux. To celebrate Vim's anniversary, creator Bram Moolenaar recently dropped version 8.0. Ordinarily the update of a text editor wouldn't be worth mentioning, but this is the first major Vim release in ten years. In today's world, where web browsers drop major point updates (what they consider major, anyway) several times a year, Vim's lack of major updates is not just refreshing, but speaks of an entirely different approach to developing software. Even leaving aside the absurd version system of today's web browsers, eight releases in 25 years would be considered slow by today's software development standards. Interestingly, though, Vim's biggest rival, GNU Emacs, has a roughly similar development pace. GNU Emacs began life in the 1970s and is currently at version 25, which means it averages two releases to Vim's one, but still definitely on the slow side.
  • Learn to code site Code.org loses student work due to index bug
    Learn-to-code site Code.org is apologising to its students after being caught by a database table maxing out, and dropping progress for an unknown number of participants. In its mea-culpa blog post, the group says it was burned by a database table with a 32-bit index.
  • GCC 7.0 Lands The BRIG Frontend For AMD's HSA
    GCC 7 moved on to only bug/documentation fixes but an exception was granted to allow the BRIG front-end to land for AMD's HSA support in this year's GNU Compiler Collection update. As of this morning, the BRIG front-end has merged. BRIG is the binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). This BRING front-end also brings the libhsail-rt run-time into GCC. So far BRIG in GCC has just been tested on Linux x86_64.

The best open source software 2017

The term ‘open source’ refers to software whose source code is freely available to download, edit, use and share. There are different types of open source license, which give users different degrees of freedom, but the main aim of open source is to encourage collaboration. Open source software has lots of advantages over other ‘free’ options you’ll come across – even if you’re not a developer yourself. It’s usually maintained by a community and updated frequently to patch vulnerabilities or squish bugs as soon as they’re identified; there are no restrictions on commercial use, so you can happily use it for your home business; and the ability to edit the source means there’s often a wealth of user-created plugins available to download. Read more

COM duo expands upon quad -A53/FPGA Zynq UltraScale+

Enclustra unveiled two Linux-ready COMs based on the quad-core Cortex-A53 based Zynq UltraScale+ ARM/FPGA SoC with DDR4 RAM up to 8GB. Enclustra’s SODIMM-style Mars XU3 and larger Mercury+ XU1 computer-on-modules run Linux on the Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. They follow Enclustra’s announcement earlier this month of a Linux-friendly Mercury+ AA1 COM running on an Intel/Altera Arria 10 ARM/FPGA hybrid. Enclustra offers several SODIMM-style Mars and larger Mercury COMs equipped with Altera and Xilinx FPGAs or FPGA/ARM hybrid SoCs, including the Altera Cyclone V based Mercury SA1. Read more