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Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux Receives Department of Defense IPv6 Certification

Filed under
Linux

earthtimes.org (PR): Red Hat today announced that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 has received Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Special Interoperability Certification from the Defense Information System Agency (DISA) in accordance with the Department of Defense (DoD) IPv6 Master Test Plan.

OpenOffice.org 2.4.0

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OOo

zdnet.com.au: OpenOffice.org 2.4.0 is a free, open source alternative to Microsoft's Office application suite. It is fantastic if you need basic office applications — such as a word processor or spreadsheet — at no cost. However, large organisations and power users may be disappointed by its lack of features and support.

“Who’s The Next Open Source Idol?”

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OSS

businesswire.com (PR): GroundWork Open Source is sponsoring a competition amongst four popular open source mascots: “Tux” the Linux kernel penguin, “Beastie” the BSD daemon, Mozilla’s Firefox, and “The Gnu” GNU.

5 Cool Firefox Alternatives for GNU/Linux

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Software

internetling.com: I still use Firefox on Debian, but sometimes I just don’t have the time or the nerves to wait for this add-on-packed conglomerate to load. While there is a noticeable speed improvement with Firefox 3, you still need some time for it to load. So, when I’m in a hurry, I sometimes fire-up an alternative browser.

Announcing the OpenOffice.org Annual Conference Beijing 2008

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OOo

PR: OpenOffice.org has today opened registration for its biggest ever annual international conference. The Conference - to be held in Beijing, China between 5th.-7th. November - is the main event of the year for developers, supporters, and users of OpenOffice.org software, the leading free software alternative to Microsoft Office.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using Grub To Change RedHat Linux's Root Password

  • Network Time Protocol (NTP) Server and Clients Setup in Ubuntu
  • FbTerm: Better terminal windows when you don't have X

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Agile Plus Open Source Equals Developer Success

  • Commercial Packages vs Open Source: Which is Better Long-term?
  • Will the real open source please stand up?
  • One Laptop per Child Lands in India
  • Better backup, syncing, and sharing
  • FOSS app eases the pain for San Diego community clinic
  • Linux Will Take Lion's Share of MID Market
  • The Asus Eee 1000 -- more power, still portable
  • KDE 4.1 in the press
  • OpenSUSE 11.0 vs Ubuntu 8.04
  • Online Security
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex Mockup Designs
  • NVIDIA driver 173.14.12 in hardy-proposed and intrepid
  • Flying on the wings of freedom
  • Open Source: A 'Growing Challenge' to Microsoft
  • Does Cloud Computing Change the Open Source Rules?
  • Lenovo Jumps Into Netbooks, But Where's Linux?

InfoWorld announces our 2008 Best of Open Source Awards

Filed under
OSS

weblog.infoworld: InfoWord recently released winners of the 2008 Bossie Awards. The awards are based on a review and analysis of the products in action by the InfoWorld Test Center.

Operating free software down on planet Earth ...

Filed under
Ubuntu

thetimes.co.za: MARK Shuttleworth isn’t just a space tourist. To geeks the world over, he’s the Self-Appointed Benevolent Dictator for Life or SABDFL for short. It’s a nickname he’s earned as the driving force behind Ubuntu — an open-source operating system based on the Linux platform that is rated one of the best.

32 Ultra-Mobile PCs That Run Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxloop.com: Back in March, I tried to find as many Linux-based UMPCs as I could. At the time, I found 18, which was expanded to 20 with the help of commenters. After many more Linux-based UMPC releases, I decided to see how many more I could find.

Debian Project News - August 4th, 2008

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Linux

debian.org/News: Welcome to this year's 8th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Some of the topics covered in this issue include: Lenny frozen, Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 updated to include support for newer hardware, and Schedule for 8th annual Debian Conference announced.

a brief history of beauty in kde 4

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KDE

In The Beginning There was a Desktop ...

KDE wasn't always the shiniest tool in the shed. While KDE 1 certainly looked more coherent and generally nicer than most things on UNIX or Linux at the time, it wasn't .. you know .. gorgeous.

X.Org 7.4 To Lose DRI2 Support

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Software

phoronix.com: It's six months late and X.Org 7.4 still hasn't shipped as its being held up on the release of Mesa 7.1. Hopefully though we'll see the release of Mesa 7.1, X.Org 7.4, and the X Server 1.5 in the very near future. However, there has been some last minute bloodshed before this first major X Server release in nearly a year.

Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase is Born

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Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Jono Bacon has announced the very first Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase! For a long time now we have been shipping a package called example-content with each release of Ubuntu. Why not use example-content as a great way to show off audio and video from free culture artists?

some Linuxworld headlines

Filed under
Linux
  • LinuxWorld Conversations Start Tomorrow

  • LinuxWorld: Showcasing the OS in data centers, mobile devices, e-voting
  • LinuxWorld Gets Underway in San Francisco
  • Dell at LinuxWorld this Week
  • Openbravo demonstrates compatibility with Ubuntu at LinuxWorld 2008
  • LinuxWorld preview: IBM engineer touts SELinux

First preview of Mono 2.0 is out

Filed under
Software
  • First preview of Mono 2.0 is out

  • Interview with Miguel de Icaza
  • How to remove Mono (M$) from Ubuntu Hardy Heron

PCLinuxOS to OpenSuse 11.0

Filed under
SUSE

bluelinux.blogspot: I recently decided to give OpenSuse 11.0 a spin on some of the computer terminals at work, replacing PCLinuxOS. It is not that I have any hard feelings towards PCLinuxOS, it is just that I prefer to stay up on the different distros available to make sure I'm not missing out on something. And, honestly, PCLinuxOS has been dragging behind the 'latest/greatest' software curve for a while now.

Why Microsoft cozied up to open source at OSCON

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Microsoft

linux.com: Last month at O'Reilly's Open Source Convention (OSCON), it seemed like Microsoft was everywhere you looked, avouching its interest in open source. Thanks to the company's history -- including some very recent history -- a great many in the open source community viewed the company's presence with mistrust, suspicious of Redmond's motives and apprehensive of what would follow. Surely Microsoft must want something, so what is it?

KDE 4.0 Style Theme for Firefox 3.0

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: Konqueror as a web browser still unfortunately lags quite a way behind Firefox in terms of compatibility. For that reason, many KDE users stick with Firefox, despite the poorer integration between the desktop environment and the browser.

The technophobe sister and Xubuntu project

Filed under
Linux

tuxtraining.com: Let me introduce to you, my sister. She’s the furtherest thing from a geek anyone in our generation can be. And she hates computers. I got a copy of Xubuntu 8.04 and began my install.

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More in Tux Machines

Bloomberg's big move on machine learning and open source

With its orange text on black interface and colour coded keyboard, the Bloomberg professional services terminal – known simply as ‘The Terminal’ – doesn’t appear to have changed much since it was launched in the early ’80s. But behind the retro (Bloomberg prefers ‘modern icon’) stylings, its delivery of financial markets data news, and trading tools has advanced rapidly. The terminal’s 315,000 subscribers globally are now able to leverage on machine learning, deep learning, and natural language processing techniques developed by the company, as they seek an edge in their investment decisions. Bloomberg is also applying those same techniques to its internal processes. Leading the company’s efforts in the area is Bloomberg’s head of data science Gideon Mann, who spoke with CIO Australia earlier this month. [...] Behind much of Bloomberg’s recent builds has been an open source ethic. Mann says there has been a sea change within the company about open source. "When the company started in 1981 and there really wasn't a whole lot of open source. And so there was a mentality of you know if it's not invented here we're not interested,” Mann says. [...] The organisation took some convincing, but, championed by the CTO, there has been a “huge culture change” towards open source. “There are two groups you got to convince: you’ve got to convince management that using open source is going to be safe and lead to better software, and then you also have to convince engineers that using open source is going to increase their skillset, will lead to software that’s easier to maintain and is less buggy and it's going to be a more beautiful system. Once you can kind of convince those two then you're set,” Mann says. The company is an active contributor to projects including Solr, Hadoop, Apache Spark and Open Stack. Read more Also: Uber Open Sources AthenaX, Its Streaming Analytics Platform

Firefox 57 - Trick or Treat?

The best way to describe Firefox 57 is too little, too late, but better later than never. In a way, it's a pointless release, because it brings us back roughly where Firefox was and should have been years ago. Only all this time in between was wasted losing user base. WebExtensions will be the thing that makes or breaks the browser, and with insufficient quality in the available replacements for those that don't make the culling list, there will be no real incentive for people to stay around. Firefox 57 is better than earlier versions in terms of looks and performance, but that's like saying you get 50% discount on a price that is twice what it should be. Ultimately unnecessary, just like graduating from university by the age of 68. There aren't any major advantages over Chrome. This is essentially a Firefox that sucks less. So yes, on the positive side, if you do want to continue using Firefox, version 57 makes much more sense than the previous 53 releases. It has an almost normal look, some of the sorely needed security & privacy addons are available, and it offers a passable user experience in terms of speed and responsiveness. Bottom line, I will stick with Firefox for now. As long as my extensions keep working. Take care. Read more

Android Leftovers

The origin and evolution of FreeDOS

Over the years, developers have shared with me how they use FreeDOS to run embedded systems. My all-time favorite example is a developer who used FreeDOS to power a pinball machine. FreeDOS ran an application that controlled the board, tallied the score, and updated the back display. I don't know exactly how it was built, but one way such a system could work is to have every bumper register a "key" on a keyboard bus and the application simply read from that input. I thought it was cool. People sometimes forget about legacy software, but it pops up in unexpected places. I used to be campus CIO of a small university, and once a faculty member brought in some floppy disks with old research data on them. The data wasn't stored in plaintext files, rather as DOS application data. None of our modern systems would read the old data files, so we booted a spare PC with FreeDOS, downloaded a shareware DOS program that could read the application data, and exported the data to plaintext. Read more