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Monday, 22 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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What business can learn from the open source movement

Filed under
OSS

thoughtleader.co.za: The open source movement, which is responsible for some of the most important innovations in IT such as the world wide web, Linux and Apache, neither pays fat bonuses nor offers flashy facilities. It does, however, provide much by the way of intangible benefits.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • LAC2008 is booted!

  • End Software Patents project comes out swinging
  • Alien Arena 2008 to be released March 1st
  • People of openSUSE: Marcus Rueckert
  • Shuttleworth Foundation puts money into telecoms
  • Enterprise Unix Roundup: Unix Heads for the Clouds
  • Bureaucracy swamps ISO meeting on Microsoft format
  • The impact of licensing choice
  • Open Letter For Open Drivers To NVIDIA
  • Being cutting edge while playing it safe: OpenSUSE Factory LiveCDs
  • Zmanda Recovery Manager 2.1
  • My Kiowa Linux Beta 3 Desktop
  • kernel-alert: When you absolutely, positively have to know when that next kernel version is released
  • Faster Performance, Fewer Machines For FreeBSD?
  • Do open source developers deserve a premium?
  • Sony Exec: “We’re toast if EEE PC makes it big”

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Loading custom compiled ALSA modules

  • Publishing a Blog in Vim with Vimpress
  • Improved Guide To Burning Dreamcast Discs From Linux
  • scponly - limited shell for secure file transfers
  • Mount remote folders via SSH
  • USB BackTrack Linux installation

Linux thriving in an anti-Windows Vista market

Filed under
Linux

tech.blorge.com: An anti-market has grown up around Windows Vista that was made possible by largely by its haphazard design and high price tag. But that works well for Linux, which is enjoying some strong sales growth at Novell.

Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron Alpha 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

distro-review.com: It's getting to the point where I should just rename "April" and "October" on my calandar "Ubuntu!" because that's what it just boils down to. If you have any interest in the state of open source software then you'll know that Ubuntu tends to be the benchmark.

When geeks and graffiti combine

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom.com: There is a lot of geeky graffiti out there. Some are just scribbles on a wall (programmer art being as it is), and some definitely qualify as artwork.

Refocusing LinuxWorld

LinuxToday: It may seem a bit weird to start a discussion about the LinuxWorld Conference and Expo (LWCE) so early in the year, but the topic came up because a friend of mine in the "biz" IM'ed me yesterday and asked if I was going to attend the Open Source Business Conference (OSBC). To me, the OSBC epitomizes what LWCE would be like without the developers and user community in attendance.

Graphics and Free Software: a great 2007, but where is OpenGL?

Filed under
Software

liquidat.wordpress: 2007 was probably The Year Of Free Graphics: AMD/ATI’s specs, a new totally Mesa , output hotplugging via XRandR and the announcement of new shiny OpenGL specs. While this all was truly great, the OpenGL releases never happened, and there are no updates on the topic.

URPMI + RPM5 = True

Filed under
MDV

Per Øyvind Karlsen: I've just finished porting urpmi (and rpmtools) to rpm 5.0, making it the first dependency solver supporting rpm 5.0! There seems to be less regressions with rpm5 currently, this was surprising considering it being a quite recent major release.

Getting Excited About KDE4

Filed under
KDE

linuxappfinder.com: A year ago I was really excited about KDE4, but the lack of some basic features I found whenever I tried a release candidate soured me a bit. I still loved the vision. When the February update showed up in Kubuntu I decided to give it another go. Now I'm happy that I did.

Fight The Power: Greening Your Linux Systems

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: Linux has a lot of advantages as a desktop operating system. Power management, unfortunately, still is not one of them. But there are plenty of ways to make a Linux system less power-hungry -- and some of the most effective fixes are also some of the easiest.

Cool Desktop Linux Applications (Part 1): Internet and networking applications

Filed under
Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: Desktop Linux has seen tremendous growth over the past few years and with this there has also been tremendous growth in number of applications relevant for desktop use available. Now most of the Linux distributions because of either space constraint or well because of licensing issue do not include many really cool applications.

End of life for Debian 3.1

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: One year after the release of Debian GNU/Linux 4.0, codenamed ‘etch’, and nearly three years after the release of Debian GNU/Linux 3.1, security support for Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 will cease at the end of March.

Extending Ubuntu's Battery Life

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: Last week when traveling to Europe for FOSDEM and other business meetings, I had picked up a new 9-cell battery for a Lenovo ThinkPad T60. While an additional three battery cells will noticeably extend your battery life, you can also extend your battery life by taking a few simple steps.

New add-ons for OpenOffice.org Writer

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: After a slow start, add-ons for OpenOffice.org are finally starting to reach a critical mass. When I last wrote about add-ons for OpenOffice.org in September 2004, the examples were relatively limited, with extendedPDF the outstanding example.

Open Source Gaming: Nexuiz 2.4 Released!

Filed under
Gaming

tipotheday.com: After a long wait, the latest edition of the fast-paced free and open source FPS, Nexuiz, has been released! Major updates include a new menu system, additional maps, more efficient use of memory, updated textures and graphics, and lots more.

Trafshow - Real Time Traffic Monitoring for the Paranoid

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: Of all the thousands of available or recommended applications out there that every geek (and non-geek) should have in their arsenal of tools, there are a few that slip under the radar and go relatively unnoticed in the tech world. One of those is trafshow. I've been using it for years, and it's one of the best network monitoring tools around.

OOXML Fails to Get Majority Approval at BRM

Filed under
OSS

groklaw: Basically, there were too many proposed changes to be able to cover them in the BRM, so they tried a workaround, but the upshot is ... it's a mess. Oddly, despite the rules, Alex Brown, Updegrove reports, allowed non P countries to vote, but OOXML still couldn't get a majority of the delegations to back it at the BRM.

Adding a UPS to a desktop Linux machine

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: An uninterruptible power supply (UPS) will allow your computer to continue to function for a period of time when mains power is lost. This can help you to smooth over short-term (1-5 minute) loss of power by running from the UPS battery.

Why I prefer Vim and not Emacs

Filed under
Software

masuran.org: If there is one question you could ask to recognize a true geek, it would be “Do you use Vi or Emacs?” If you’re talking to a geek they will either start laughing because they recognize you as a fellow geek or they will start talking about the merits of their favorite editor.

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Kernel Space: HMM, Cloud Native, Linux 4.12, TFS, Linux 4.11.2, and 4.10 EoL

  • Faster machine learning is coming to the Linux kernel
    Heterogenous memory management (HMM) allows a device’s driver to mirror the address space for a process under its own memory management. As Red Hat developer Jérôme Glisse explains, this makes it easier for hardware devices like GPUs to directly access the memory of a process without the extra overhead of copying anything. It also doesn't violate the memory protection features afforded by modern OSes.
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ROSA Fresh R9

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