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Sunday, 24 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The kernel column srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 6:04pm
Story What City Is Your Distro? srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 4:55pm
Story What’s New in Opera 11.50 srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 4:29pm
Story UK shakes dust off open source policy srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 4:27pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 7:06am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 6:43am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS KDE 2011.6 post installation tips. Texstar 28/06/2011 - 5:57am
Story The decline of ‘open source’ as an identifying differentiator srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 4:42am
Story Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 4:41am
Story 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 26: Connecting Peripherals srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 2:12am

Freeing an old game - Relicensing UMoria

Filed under
Gaming

People are often attracted to games before they are attracted to the free software movement. This means that many free software enthusiasts are addicted to non-free games. This is what turns some people to free software—the inability to see how a game works, or the inability to legally share it with friends.

Writing shell scripts which execute locally or remotely

Filed under
HowTos

There are a lot of times when it is useful to have a single shell script run both upon the local host, and also upon remote hosts. Here we'll show a simple trick which allows you to accomplish this easily.

To execute shell scripts remotely the most obvious approach is to copy it there, with scp, and then use ssh to actually execute it. This is similar to running simple commands remotely using ssh directly:

skx@mine:~$ ssh yours uptime
07:12:25 up 3 days, 18:15, 0 users, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.08
skx@mine:~$

With that in mind the solution becomes:

Network File System (NFS) Server and Client Configuration in Debian

Filed under
HowTos

NFS was developed at a time when we weren’t able to share our drives like we are able to today - in the Windows environment. It offers the ability to share the hard disk space of a big server with many smaller clients. Again, this is a client/server environment. While this seems like a standard service to offer, it was not always like this. In the past, clients and servers were unable to share their disk space.

Why Dell Is Really Saying No to Linux

By now, many of you may be wondering why Dell is passing up such a great niche market by not offering Linux as an alternative OS option to Windows. We have talked about how this would only prove to benefit a company like Dell, but we have also acknowledged the fact that it will likely never happen.

OpenOffice.org Issues an Invitation to Dell Computer Corporation

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice.org urges Dell's CEO to respond to customer demand and bundle
http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/add/story
OpenOffice.org's free software alternative to Microsoft Office with Dell's computers

One laptop per child

Filed under
Hardware

For some time, I've been aware of online discussions going on about an innovative project to build cheap laptop computers to be given to kids in developing countries.

The goal was to build a sub-$100 (about R740) laptop computer which could not only be used by children to learn computing skills, but to assist them with completing their other schoolwork as well.

I reserved judgement on the idea but it now seems as if it really is going to fly, with numbers of test machines having been delivered to communities around the world and large scale production due to start later in the year.

Book Review: IPCOP Firewalls - Closing borders with Open Source

Filed under
Reviews

IPCop is a GPLed firewall solution targeted at Small Office/Home Office network. It is favored by many for its ease of configuration and setup and its support for a variety of features that you would expect to have in a modern firewall. IPCop is famed for letting users setup a sophisticated firewall for ones network without ever having to write an iptables rule themselves.

Are you an open source user or joiner?

Filed under
OSS

In my previous column, I touched on the issue of what constitutes an open-source vendor. Ask Andy Astor that question, and his answer is a shrug. "Honestly," he says, "who cares?" To Astor, there are really two broad categories of companies with respect to their relationship to open-source code. Some are users. Others are joiners.

An open letter: from a consumer to the distributions

Filed under
Linux

My name is Adam Posey, I'm a resident of Elkins, West Virginia and a GNU/Linux user. I do not run a server nor I do not own a business. What I do have is considerable influence over the buying decisions of other people around me because I am knowledgeable in technology. I have grown very weary of the current state of Linux for the home user.

A Second Look At Pardus 2007.1 RC: Surprises, Surprises

Filed under
Linux

My first look at Pardus 2007.1 Release Candidate was somehow pessimistic, however I was confident in the future. This second attempt will start by showing some success, however it will end with an even more pessimistic view. But let's not anticipate...

An Update On Server/Site Move

Filed under
Site News

Well, I guess we'll go with this debian install. I still haven't worked out all the kinks yet cuz my gran'babies came over today and I didn't get a chance to work on things. I took the opportunity to upgrade drupal as you may have noticed too, and it was a much easier upgrade this time.

Linux Mint: Taking Ubuntu to the Next Level

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

For the last several years, Ubuntu has been providing a superb desktop operating system consisting of open-source software. It has done a great job, but the philosophy behind Ubuntu prevents proprietary software from being included out of the box. This is where Linux Mint comes in.

Home networking Linux and Windows

Filed under
Linux

Lately I've been working on enabling network shares on most of the systems that run in my house. They're the various computers that have shown up over the years and are now parked in corners of rooms around my house. With the exception of the iMac and europa, every one came with Windows pre-installed. If they run Linux, it was installed well after the fact.

Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care

Filed under
OSS

My first planel for South by Southwest was titled, "Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care." Four advocates discussed the reasons for using open source. Pleasantly, there was almost no Microsoft-bashing, and only a little discussion of using open source because it's socially the right thing to do.

Open source can be very `benefit-driven'

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Over the last five years, the IT community has seen a consuming increase in the usage of open-source technologies and acknowledged the role Sun Microsystems played in the process. eWorld spoke to Matt Thomson of Sun Microsystems Inc at Sun Tech Days.

Linux Good for Environment and Bottom Line

Filed under
Linux

A new report from the UK government has found that switching to Linux can not only cut costs but also help reduce the burden of e-waste by dramatically reducing hardware obsolescence.

Four weeks with Ubuntu Linux on the desktop. Part 1: Switching is hard

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the past few weeks, I’ve found that the saying “it just works” is about as useful as saying that airplanes “just fly.” It’s an easy thing to say until you have to learn to pilot one. Foreign languages also “just work.” But have you ever tried to learn one?

Linux is like that.

bash ninja - everyday commands for the commandline

Filed under
HowTos

When using the terminal, there are a lot of tricks and shortcuts that can make using the terminal much more efficient and pleasurable. I'll list here some of the key ones that I use.

Review of Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha 5 (Feisty Fawn)

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

There's a lot of exciting things going on in the world of Linux distros and while browsing for alternatives to (K)Ubuntu I stumbled across PCLinuxOS. While discussing my new found love for PCLOS I decided that I shouldn't forget the distro that seems to have started it all - Ubuntu!

How To Use Jigdo For Incremental CD Updates (Daily Builds)

Filed under
HowTos

Jigdo is really nice for rebuilding daily CD images without downloading the entire CD again, which can waste bandwidth and time when the latest daily build may have only updated a handful of packages. Here is what you’ll need to setup and use Jigdo.

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More in Tux Machines

Phoronix on Graphics

Leftovers: Software

Emulation or WINE

Fedora: The Latest

  • New "remi-php71" repository
  • PHP on the road to the 7.1.0 release
  • First round of Fedora 24 Updated Lives now available. (torrents expected later this week)
    As noted by my colleague on his blog the first round of F24 Updated Lives are now available and carry the date 20160720, Also as mentioned last week on his blog F23 Respins are not going to be actively made, however we and the rest of the volunteer team will field off-off requests as time and resources permit. We are considering a new/second tracker for the Updated Spins but as of today there are only .ISO files available at https://alt.fedoraproject.org/pub/alt/live-respins [shortlink] F24 Live-Respins . The F24 respins carry the 4.6.4-200 Kernel and roughly ~500M of updates since the Gold ISOs were released just 5 weeks ago. (some ISOs have more updates, some less)